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Penguin II Air Conditioner Install Advice?


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Well my two Penguin II High Capacity Heat Pump air conditioners arrived last week.  Today we got the old Duotherm units off the roof and the new Penguin IIs up on the roof.

I could use a little advice from anyone who's done this before.

Now I need to get them wired up.  I have the CCII thermostat, which I purchased at the same time as the new units

The connectors from the coach are different and there's no junction box with circuit board inside the coach where the intake air comes in, as there was in the Duotherm assembly.  There's a circuit board in the unit on the roof, where the dip switches are, which I suppose takes the place of the one the Duotherm had in the air intake area.

The Duotherm had a 4 wire molex. The Penguin IIs came with a 6 wire molex attached to the unit and mating molex connectors with wires attached, in small plastic bags.  Tomorrow I'll cut off the 4 wire molex connectors and splice those 6 wire connectors on

The coach has a romex which was connected to the Duotherm with wire nuts, inside the junction box.  The Penguin II has a very cool 3 wire connector for the AC, but did not come with a connector for the other side.  What to do?  Should I try to get the mating connector?  Or just cut the connector off and use wire nuts?  I've googled for that AC connector and not come up with anything.  If anyone knows what that connector is and how to get it, I could use a pointer.

Now . . . what to do with the wires?  There's no junction box.  I don't want them loose and flapping around in the intake air side. There is a small cavity in the Penguin II where the wires were stored for transport.  Stuff all the wires in there as much as I can and tape it all up?  Suggestions welcome.

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I found this info. Hope it will be of help...

Replacing a Dometic AC/Heat Pump on a Monaco Coach

Replacing a Dometic AC/Heat Pump on a Monaco Coach

I just replaced a Dometic Penguin AC Heat Pump on our Monaco coach. I included lots of detail and hints so this is a long post!
Our rear heat pump went full hot a few weeks ago. The electromagnetic coil that operates the heat pump reversing valve failed and it was blowing hot air. These older units were designed to operate in Heat Pump mode unless 120V is applied to a reversing coil. So when the coil fails the AC goes into heat pump mode. I tried a rare earth magnet on the valve as well as some of the other suggestions but none of that worked. I finally found a replacement coil for $32 and that fixed it but I had already decided to replace it.

Our rear unit is the last of the three original 13,500 BTU heat pumps that came from the factory on our coach and I’ve wanted to replace it with a 15,000 BTU version. PPL motorhomes had the Dometic AC’s on sale so I ordered a new one. The Dometic model we used is 651816CXX1CO. It is a 15,000 BTU Penguin low profile (9 ½”) heat pump model. Dometic AC’s now come set up for the new 12 button CCC3 thermostat and our coach uses the 5 button CCC (comfort control center) thermostat. So I also ordered a Dometic #3313107.107 control board adapter kit (see picture). This new control board replaces the one that comes in the unit and makes it compatible with our 5 button thermostat.

The first thing you have to do is install the new control board. I’ve done this previously on a standard Dometic AC and it was easier. The new heat pump model adds two extra wires for the electromagnetic coil and a slew of wires for the new CCC3. First you remove the large plastic shroud that covers the unit. It comes off with just 4 screws. Then there is a small metal cover on the right side of the unit that covers the control board/electrical wiring. Remove two small screws and tilt it back (it will remain attached because of the foam strips). First remove the upper row of wires on the board and push them out of the way. Don’t worry about what color goes where as the instructions will guide you through reconnecting wires. Now the hardest part in replacing the control board is to compress the PC board plastic standoff pins so you can remove the board. These are small plastic pins that the side tabs spread out as the board is pressed onto it. You have to depress these small plastic tabs to pull the board off. There are 4 standoff pins. The top 2 are easy to get at with a pair of needle nose pliers but the bottom two are buried. Just take your time and resist the urge to force it off. If the lock tabs are not visible, you can rotate the entire standoff pin so the tabs are at the 9 and 3 o’clock positions. Then use long needle nose pliers to depress the tabs while applying outward pressure from behind the board with a screwdriver. This latest kit came with new standoff pins in case you break one.

Then you can lift the board up so you can easily remove the lower wires.
You must set the “Dip switches” for your application (see picture) on the new board. Zone 1 is the default with no switches set to on. Zone 2 switch on makes it zone 2, zone 3 on makes it zone 3, or zone 4 on makes it zone 4. If your system also has a furnace or Aqua hot system, turn the furnace dip switch on for the appropriate zones. There are additional Dip switches (heat strip, differential, stage, and gen start) that may be applicable to your application. Check your old control board and repeat the settings it has on the new board. Try setting these with your finger nail as they can break if you use a screwdriver.

You will need to install a new ambient temp sensor supplied with the kit. Next, just follow the instructions in reconnecting wires to the new board. You connect the lower wires to the new board before you fully install it so they are easier to access. Then install the board onto the standoff pins. Continue to follow the instructions step by step replacing wires. The board is labeled and the wires are color coded. You will have to cut two wire terminals off and terminate one and use a butt connector on another (you will need to supply these connectors). Double check all your connections and replace the small metal cover.

There is a large bundle of wires and junction box that are routed down through the bottom of the AC air inlet. Tuck these in out of the way until you get it installed on the roof.

The next part can be the hardest part. You must somehow get the 120# AC unit onto the roof of your RV. The accepted method is to use the longest ladder you can find and slide the unit up the ladder pulling it with a tow strap or rope (unless you have access to a forklift!). Some folks back a pickup truck up to the coach and run the ladder from the pickup bed to the coach roof. This helps the angle so you are not pulling it up vertical. My neighbors F-150 is only a few days old and he didn’t like this idea, but he did volunteer to get on the roof and help me pull. We put the AC unit back in the original box and put two small cargo straps around the box lengthwise. I then tied a 20’ tow strap to the cargo straps and maneuvered the box up to the base of the ladder. I tried to pull the box up by myself but was not able. With my neighbor helping it went pretty well. I then unpacked the AC and set it on the roof next to the one I was replacing.

I had thought this through the night before and decided to install the new 15,000 BTU unit in the center position (replacing a 1 year old 13,500 BTU) and move the current 13,500 unit from the center to the rear. My reasoning is the front part of the coach is always a challenge to cool down in the heat and the rear bedroom usually cools easily.

Now you need to go inside and remove the inside AC vent cover assembly. On our Windsor these just unclip and swing down. On our Exec and Sig the covers unbolt on one side and hinge down. Then remove the filter assembly so you can see the bottom of the AC and ducting from inside. The wiring and AC junction box are generally on the passenger side of the duct assembly. Pull the circuit breaker and remove the cover from the junction box and disconnect the 110v AC wiring. It should be connected white to white, black to black, and yellow/green ground to bare ground with wire nuts. The only part of this that’s difficult is if they screwed the junction box to the roof support and there is not enough clearance to get a drill/driver into place to remove the box. I had to use a shorty Phillips and remove it by hand.

Take a picture and/or write down the DC wiring color code from what color to what color as well as which wires (yellow) are not connected to anything. I also cut the DC wires near the butt connector leaving ½” of the original wire connected. Then when wiring the new unit I can see what color was originally connected to each house wire and work my way through them.
The AC units communicate with the thermostat through RJ11 telephone cords (they are actually reverse wired but unless you are replacing a cord it doesn’t matter). Just unclip both RJ11 cords. It does not matter which one goes where, they are interchangeable.

Now you are almost ready to remove the old AC unit. IF you are replacing the same model unit, before you remove it make some lines with a Sharpie on the roof at each corner to help you center the new one. You need to remove four LONG bolts that go through the roof into nut plates in the AC baseplate. I use a drill/driver and a long extension to reach them. After the 4 bolts are removed you need to cut and remove the alum tape sealing the ducts together.
Now you are almost ready to remove the AC from the roof. Some coaches utilize a condensation drain system. This consists of 2 small plastic “cups” screwed to each front corner of the AC base plate with a cross hose and connector to the coach drain hose. If your coach has this system, disconnect the hose from the cross tube to the coach drain hose. Now lift the old AC unit off of the roof. Some folks glue them down with silicone sealer although Dometic does not recommend it. If yours is glued down, take a long screw driver and inert it in between the foam gasket and roof in several places until you can break it loose.

Clean the roof well removing the old sealant and gasket. The new AC unit comes with a new roof gasket. However, if your coach has the drain system, you will need a second foam gasket so the condensation cups and hose do not get crushed when you tighten the new AC to the roof. Remove the drain system from the old unit and reinstall on the new one. Cut a small groove into the foam gasket that comes on the new AC unit so your drain hose can go from side to side. Seal this groove to the drain cross hose with some sealant and install the second foam gasket over it. You will also need some foam spacers for the four corner supports of the unit to help stabilize it on the roof.

Some coaches will use a connector duct in between the AC base outlet duct and the coach inlet duct. This is just a small sheet metal duct 4” X 4 1/4” and 2-4” long depending on your roof thickness. You will need to remove this from the old AC and screw it onto the bottom side of the new AC outlet baseplate. You may also have to reconnect the drainage hose (sometimes this can be done from inside). Note: If you have a Newmar coach you need to be cautious here. They use different ductwork than the rest of the RV community and require some special separators between the AC and the ductwork.

Now the trick is to properly place the new AC unit over the opening centering the AC outlet duct over the coach inlet duct. You are not supposed to slide it in place, but lower it in place so that one duct fits into the other. This will take two people. If you are by yourself, you can position the AC on its side next to the opening and gently swing it sideways down into position so as not to crush the ductwork. It would help here to have someone inside guiding as you lower it, otherwise you have to go inside the coach yourself and look at your alignment. You can make small adjustments pushing from inside, but anything large and you need to go back on top and try again.attachment.php?attachmentid=214402&d=153
Edited by Howard
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No. On the Molex plug part he’s talking about the 12v and furnace connections. But he's mainly asking about a mobile home power connector that comes preinstalled on the new AC power cable.

The mobile home connector is classified as a junction box; used inside the wall to connect pre-wired mobile home wall sections. You could cut it off and splice in a regular junction box, or buy the mating plug.

It’s not easy to figure out what’s needed... I spell out the exact part number in this thread:

Cheers 

Walter

Edited by wamcneil
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Thanks Walter.

The link to the connector was VERY helpful.  30 minutes of google yesterday did not come up with that.

I ordered the connectors from Mouser.  They will arrive on Wednesday

Meanwhile I've got the control wiring hooked up and the furnaces are working, which of course is what I need right now, since it's real cold here now . . . well . . . cold for Southern California . . .

I also ordered and received the CC2 Thermostat, which is a LOT nicer than the 5 button.  I did read Chris Throgmartin's post about a new Penguin II working with the 5 button.  So before I removed the 5 button I just tried it.  Thermostat lit up but furnaces would not come on.  I then put the CC2 on and the furnaces fired right up.

For anyone interested, here's the link from Walter's post for the connector:

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/molex/19045-1000/?qs=c7V%2bsbZfmqvqLYL%2bCrIKLw%3D%3D&countrycode=US&currencycode=USD

I've attached a picture of the connector that comes with the Penguin II.  The link above is for the mating part, which will go on the romex from the motorhome.

For anyone changing out their air conditioners, it would be useful to order this part in advance.

 

Dwight

image.png

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Dwight,

The Dometic Penguin II's that I installed back in the winter of 2019/20 did not come with that type of connector. I had ordered model number 651816CXX1CO from PPL in Texas.

What model number Penguin's did you order that came with that unique connector?

Mine were an exact replacement of the old Penguin's I removed, wiring harnesses and all.

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4 hours ago, Dr4Film said:

The Dometic Penguin II's that I installed back in the winter of 2019/20 did not come with that type of connector. I had ordered model number 651816CXX1CO from PPL in Texas.

The 651816HXX1C0-01 that I ordered from adventurerv.net in August came with the self contained power connector attached. Installation of the SCPC onto the romex was covered in the current dometic installation document, but there was no mating connector supplied with the unit and there's no mention in there of what kind of plug you need..

I'm not sure if that's just the way they ship them now... 

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Hmm,  mine came with the connector and I guess both sides, can't recall exactly the hook up but I didn't need to buy additional elect parts.                                                  However mine didn't have the gasket attached.   BTW  I just gathered up all the excess wires into a bundle, wire tied it and stuffed the bundle into the cavity where they came shipped in.

One needs to be handy when working on these coaches because you never really know what to expect even with Dometic

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Did you get printed instructions?  
I did not get any printed instructions with the unit, and thought the connector (if supplied) might have been in a bag with the instructions. 
I reached out to dometic to ask if I should have received printed instructions and the connector. They wouldn’t even answer the question... and told me to contact a distributor for support 😟

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I ordered two 651816HXX1C0-01 Dometic Penguin II W/ Heat Pump High Capacity Low Profile Rooftop Air

I got them from rvpartscountry.com.  I ordered them on November 28. The website said 5 - 6 weeks for delivery, but they shipped right away and I had them in hand a week later.  They were likely quite recently manufactured.

There were no instructions inside the box.  I downloaded instructions from the Dometic website and the instructions I downloaded did not have any reference to the power connector.  There was a small plastic bag in each unit that had a 6 connector molex with wires attached, to which I spliced the control wires coming from the coach.  That was really easier than it looked at first.

Dwight

Edited by Dwight Lindsey
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5 hours ago, Dwight Lindsey said:

I downloaded instructions from the Dometic website and the instructions I downloaded did not have any reference to the power connector. 

This document is from March 2019 and labeled as "Dometic CCC 2 LCD SZ 3314850.000 Electronic ADB Brisk Air Penguin HP"

https://documents.dometic.com/?object_id=54637

I downloaded it thinking it was installation instructions for the CCC2 specifically, but it's a full AC unit install manual. See pp 12-14 for instructions on the power connector. I'm not sure if this is now standard, but it's in their installation manual.

Cheers,

Walter

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19 hours ago, wamcneil said:

The 651816HXX1C0-01 that I ordered from adventurerv.net in August came with the self contained power connector attached. Installation of the SCPC onto the romex was covered in the current dometic installation document, but there was no mating connector supplied with the unit and there's no mention in there of what kind of plug you need..

I'm not sure if that's just the way they ship them now... 

My Blizzard I installed a few months ago had the above connector on the unit with a kit to install the matching connector on the coach wiring.

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22 hours ago, Dwight Lindsey said:

I ordered two 651816HXX1C0-01 Dometic Penguin II W/ Heat Pump High Capacity Low Profile Rooftop Air

I got them from rvpartscountry.com.  I ordered them on November 28. The website said 5 - 6 weeks for delivery, but they shipped right away and I had them in hand a week later.  They were likely quite recently manufactured....

Dwight

Interesting, I also ordered two from rvpartscountry.com, but I ordered mine Oct 24th and have not received them yet.  I did get the acknowledgement of the order and the charge card has been billed and paid. I wasn't in a big hurry as a couple of months fit my schedule.   Maybe I'll get notified soon.  So much for a FIFO queue....  I see other sites still advertising "backordered".

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3 hours ago, amphi_sc said:

Interesting, I also ordered two from rvpartscountry.com, but I ordered mine Oct 24th and have not received them yet.  I did get the acknowledgement of the order and the charge card has been billed and paid. I wasn't in a big hurry as a couple of months fit my schedule.   Maybe I'll get notified soon.  So much for a FIFO queue....  I see other sites still advertising "backordered".

In March I ordered an oscilloscope that obviously was coming from China and it took over 4 months to arrive. COVID I guess.

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I ordered the ones with the white shrouds.

I just finished putting the power connectors on.  Once you've done it once it's easy the 2nd time . . .  They are really very nice connectors.

So my air conditioners are running now and cooling.  Haven't tried the heat pump mode yet, but I don't anticipate a problem.

Now I've got to get some aluminum duct tape and tape up the inside and put the ceiling back together . . . 

Dwight

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I just cycled my fan through lo/med/high a few times. The various speeds are not night&day different.

I'd be hard pressed to hear the difference between lo and med. Going from med to high is a bit more noticeable. Then the step from high back down to low is pretty easy to hear.

Cheers,

Walter

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  • 1 year later...
Posted (edited)

Learning how to replace your RV air conditioner gasket can help protect your RV's interior from water damage and contribute to a more comfortable night's sleep. The RV air conditioner has a visor or visor to protect it from flying objects, debris, and other particles. This cover usually has some screws or bolts to secure it to the roof of the RV.

Edited by Dalton07
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