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I think my last post got somewhat hijacked. I was finally able to pull down some speakers and put my phone inside and take some photos. As you can see one of them does have a water spot. Looks old and dry. The rest look like the adhesive is failing. There are quite a bit  of areas with no adhesive. All the metal ribs seem to be fine and attached well. This is happing in a large area in the rear of the coach. So I guess my question is why is the roof rising? 

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Looks like the adhesive was never put down well.  Kinda is what it is.

I would apply additional thick adhesive (caulk tube) like construction adhesive or ideally SikaFlex

https://www.ellsworth.com/products/by-market/general-industry/sealants/polyurethane/sika-sikaflex-221-non-sag-polyurethane-sealant-gray-10.3-oz-cartridge/

You can apply heavy weights on the roof above the spar.  If you do this on a hot day, then the old adhesive will soften up and allow the roof to lower more to the aluminum joist.  don't walk on it after the weights are set for a few days until it's really dry.

The water mark - no biggie.  Just ensure your roof is sealed everywhere (in general, your pics look like it's in good overall shape).

 

Looks like some varmints got into the ceiling.  Shop vac out all that crap.

 

Did you pull out insulation?  I would stuff it all in (loosely for best R value) before putting your speakers back.  I would pull more things to do more inspection.

 

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Terry:

I have climbed well over 2,000 Monaco roofs in my career and have seen it all. Depressions, rising spots, cracks, holes, you name it. The one thing many coach owners do not realize is the amount of torque and twisting our house frames go through over the years. Jacking, leveling, dropping a front or rear tire into a low spot on a driveway, uneven secondary roads, etc. The amount of flex applied to the bodies of our coaches is unreal. This is why we see so many popped belt lines in our shop.

My suggestion is to leave your roof alone. If there are no cracks on the roof or the roof radius's or if there is no separation at the seams then leave well enough alone. By injecting an adhesive into those voids, you are going to create pressure points. The luann board has already warped and trying to get it back into its former state is going to be a waste of time.

Your concern needs to be the super structure. If the wood is not rotted then leave well enough alone. If you start seeing cracks on the outside edges on the radius then you can go back and address it. Otherwise live with it. I cannot count the number of roofs I have walked on where the roof moved up and down under my feet from the roof floating and being separated from the cross members.

The only roofs I have seen on Monaco's that needed attention were the upper end models and were all built in Coeburg. Some of the Dynastys ( and a few Exec's and Sig's ) were missing critical support cross members. This caused air con units to sag and drop. Bob and Sunny's coach is a perfect example.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Chris,

You mentioned upper-end Coburg built coaches with “missing critical support cross members”. Can you please elaborate? With regards to the ceiling/roof construction, how do the Coburg units differ from those built in Indiana? I assume these upper-end coaches have the recessed ceiling area with the drop-down panels.

We have a Coburg built 2006 Patriot Thunder and the weight of the A/C unit and satellite dish has created a depression in the roof resulting in standing water around both. After exploring the ceiling/roof construction in the living room I can understand why, it appears that the recessed ceiling area is significantly under-built.

Scott

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