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Monacoers Daily Digest


Scotty Hutto
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Welcome to Bill D's Monacoers' Daily digest for *|date|*

To view this on the web click here: https://www.monacoers.org/newsletters/issue/475-monacoers-daily-digest/.  To respond to a post, click on the post title to be taken to that topic on the website.

Hello *|member_name|*, 

Here's what the Monacoers were talking about yesterday:

 

Index

Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
wayne.cerven@gmail.com
CCC thermostat
wamcneil
A/C Part Identification
Harvey Babb
VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Bobbyboy
VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Hypoxia
Overheating
Nevada Rob
Air bag discharge
Nevada Rob
Air bag discharge
cbr046
Air bag discharge
Chargerman
Overheating
Chuck B
VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Bobbyboy
On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow
On the road shop horror stories
Romeo84
On the road shop horror stories
Rick A
On the road shop horror stories
ktloah
On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow
CCC thermostat
Dr4Film
Overheating
Mel S - '96 Safari
On the road shop horror stories
Dr4Film
On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow
On the road shop horror stories
Tom Wallis
Overheating
Mel S - '96 Safari
09 HR Navigator
jcavataio5255
Hill climbing
Gary Cole
VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Hypoxia
Hill climbing
John Haggard
Overheating
Toddgoodwin
On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow
Hill climbing
Rick A
Hill climbing
wpools
Air bag discharge
Nevada Rob
VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Bobbyboy

New Posts

Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
John Haggard

Regardless 

The ability to tap lots of $$$$$s

Total engine rebuild,  $40 to $50 thousands 

New radiator installed??? $5,000 maybe

Anyplace you travel there are semis and tractors running.

NAPA stores are in very remote places at times.

These trucks and tractors  all need tire services ,towing and part's services. 

Personally,  I  carry LOTS of tools

Belts, filters, re built alternator,  aquahot, 

Rebuilt burner and nozels and  filter.

Solenoids plus just stuff 

Light bulbs, fuses etc.  

 

 

 

 


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
wayne.cerven@gmail.com
8 hours ago, JDCrow said:

Have a great trip planned for October (Utah, Nevada, Arizona) and wanted to ask besides the insane amount of tools I pack with me, what parts are critical? 
 

I believe many have said ride height adjusters, and I assume fuses and fluids. Any thing that stands out that I can’t pick up out on the road to nowhere 

 

Road side assistance, hopefully good enough plan that they will tow for at least 150 miles, as John mentioned the emergency fund.

Wayne 

1999 Signature Caesar 


CCC thermostat
wamcneil

The dip switches are pretty straightforward. Don’t let that simple task determine your choice of thermostat. 
Cheers

Walter


A/C Part Identification
Harvey Babb

Moonwink I think you nailed the "why it's there" question. I hadn't seen that used in mobile systems at all and very rarely in fixed systems, so had been scratching my head about it's purpose. 


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
JDCrow

LOL yeah I get money. 
 

We have Roadside on 2 fronts. 3A and our insurance. 
 

And as far as an engine rebuild if someone is shelling $40-$50k for an engine, I’d think they need a new shop to goto. 


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Bobbyboy

Went to take off for the fourth of July and got about 1 block and red stop engine light came on.  Turned around and went back to the bus barn.  Error code 2636 shows up which says Abnormal Update Rate to the Actuator---the data cable not sending to the ECM.  So check a few things then started up again--no light.  So took it out on hwy and light came on.  WEnt about a mile and light went out;  ran about 10 miles and still no light.  So I tdurned around and went back to the bus barn.  Had lunch then tdried it again.  Light came back on;  ran for about 10 minutes in place and light went out.  Tried again this morning and no light; but it came on after about 10 minutes then would blink off and on every so often.  I checked for loose connections from the actuator to the ECM but nada.  Not sure what is going on;  several suggestions in the Cummins manual but have not gotten any further into it.  It appears that it is an intermittent thing--not sure if it is the 12V to the actuator or the data link.  Anybody have suggestions??   

Bob L, 08 dynasty.  P. S. bus has run perfect until this happened.  It only sat for about 2 weeks before I tried to take off for the 4th.       


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
John Haggard

Big blocks,  yes

Not uncommon when on the road.

You become a victim 

 

For rvs with pickup truck diesels 

Yes

Much, much less usually. 

 

 


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Ivylog

Sounds like you have a 07-08 engine with a complicated VGT activator… good luck with finding an intermittent problem.

Were you able to get 100% power with the light on?

I currently have a stuck VGT limiting how much boost I can get now that I’m out West. My 06 engine has an external activator that cannot be moved…thinking  of using oven cleaner in the exhaust side of the turbo to loosen the moving ring that varies the angle of the gains.


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Hypoxia

Terminating resistors?  I have two that I know of, one by the engine and one in the drivers side console.


Overheating
Nevada Rob

A clean radiator is a great place to start especially with a rear pusher fan system. Every bit of road crud gets picked up and blown into the fan and then stuck in the cooling fins. I use WaterWetter along with coolant and it helps. Yesterday coming home it was 113 degrees. 2008 Dynasty with ISL 425 pulling a 22 ft enclosed trailer. 4% grade with a 15 mph head wind. Engine temp runs up to 214 degrees then back down to just above 195. From info in to original post, I don't think the problem is a major deal. A little play time with a garden hose on a hot summer day sounds like a good time.

 https://www.amazon.com/Red-Line-80204-Water-Wetter/dp/B000CPI5ZK


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
BobSchmeck

A tow vehicle (jeep wrangler preferred) just incase you break down then you have a way to go get parts. Also you can use it to push it into town. 

Not recommend but have seen it done. 


Air bag discharge
Nevada Rob

I spent 3 days chasing down air leaks. We found and fixed 16 air leaks. Not one leak was the actual air bags. Most leaks were from fittings on the primary and secondary air tanks. Now our air leveling system works as it should. We do not have hydraulic levelers only air levelers. The coach remained level for 4 days without the auxiliary air compressor coming on once. Air leaks are common but they are not "normal". It is a bit of work but well worth the time to get the air system in top shape. We replaced every leaking quick connect fitting with solid brass compression. Well worth the time and effort.


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
John Haggard
18 minutes ago, BobSchmeck said:

A tow vehicle (jeep wrangler preferred) just incase you break down then you have a way to go get parts. Also you can use it to push it into town. 

Not recommend but have seen it done. 

Yes

Unlimited flight miles are good to have. 

Loved

Pushing with a jeep also.

Not uncommon to have the coach in the shop for 2 weeks to 2 months.

So housing

Travel back home.

Camp ground cancelations All can Add up.


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
96 EVO
10 hours ago, Ivan K said:

AC capacitors. Aqua Hot nozzle if you have that. Fuel filters. Hard to get any of these in boonies and with no address to have it shipped when on the move. And so much more and never enough... Roadside assistance.

I'm getting quite a collection of used but functioning emergency AH nozzles 😃!

Guess I should have been dating them, and I could have been tossing the oldest when I install a new one.


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
Ray Davis

If you have one, you might want to take the wife.   Assuming she wants to go.  Maybe even the kids & dogs,  neighbors, friends but only if they bring money.🤑

I haven't tried leaving without mine ( wife ) but I'm pretty sure I would be in trouble if I did.  😏


Air bag discharge
cbr046
1 hour ago, Nevada Rob said:

I spent 3 days chasing down air leaks. We found and fixed 16 air leaks. Not one leak was the actual air bags. Most leaks were from fittings on the primary and secondary air tanks. Now our air leveling system works as it should. We do not have hydraulic levelers only air levelers. The coach remained level for 4 days without the auxiliary air compressor coming on once. Air leaks are common but they are not "normal". It is a bit of work but well worth the time to get the air system in top shape. We replaced every leaking quick connect fitting with solid brass compression. Well worth the time and effort.

Can you describe your technique?  Finding leaks I'm not worried about.  HOW TO FIX THEM I'm a little fuzzy.  Do your just tighten the fittings 1/8 turn?  Teflon tape?  Replacing valves? 

tia,

- bob


Air bag discharge
Chargerman

I have found many leaks at the “push on” air fittings. I was able to resolve each one by removing the air line and cutting of a short piece of line at the compressed ring on the line and reinstalling it. Be sure your air system is drained first. 


Overheating
Chuck B

There is a lot of difference in the mechanics of cooling in a rear radiator versus a side radiator coach cooling.  There is also a lot of difference in the mechanics involved in side radiator cooling.  Apples to oranges?  Chuck B 2004 Windsor


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
Dr4Film

Here is my small list of important things to carry on any trip.

Coach-Net Emergency Roadside Service

Credit card with $20,000 access

Extra fuel filters, primary, secondary, generator, Aqua-Hot (replenish after using)

Spare Water Pump

18 inch 6 gauge jumper wire with eyes on both ends to jump between House and Chassis battery banks when your alternator fails. I also carry a spare alternator.

5 amp Smart Battery Charger 120 VAC with extension cord.

Spare 10 foot collapsible sewer hose (new)

Fuses - standard and mini

Water Bandit when water spigot is damaged

 


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
vito.a

Is it a Cummins ISL or ISM?

How many miles?  Has it ever done this before?  Hope you get it figured out.  


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
JDCrow
23 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

Here is my small list of important things to carry on any trip.

Coach-Net Emergency Roadside Service

Credit card with $20,000 access

Extra fuel filters, primary, secondary, generator, Aqua-Hot (replenish after using)

Spare Water Pump

18 inch 6 gauge jumper wire with eyes on both ends to jump between House and Chassis battery banks when your alternator fails. I also carry a spare alternator.

5 amp Smart Battery Charger 120 VAC with extension cord.

Spare 10 foot collapsible sewer hose (new)

Fuses - standard and mini

Water Bandit when water spigot is damaged

 

Good one with the Water pump. Already pack a water Bandit. Had not thought about an alternator LOL 

47 minutes ago, Ray Davis said:

If you have one, you might want to take the wife.   Assuming she wants to go.  Maybe even the kids & dogs,  neighbors, friends but only if they bring money.🤑

I haven't tried leaving without mine ( wife ) but I'm pretty sure I would be in trouble if I did.  😏

Mine seems excited to go. Seems 

2 hours ago, BobSchmeck said:

A tow vehicle (jeep wrangler preferred) just incase you break down then you have a way to go get parts. Also you can use it to push it into town. 

Not recommend but have seen it done. 

Putting together the Toad. Will do a thread on it. 


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
Dr4Film

JD,

By the way, after reading your post once again, i really don't think it is necessary to carry Ride Height Adjuster Valves. I haven had the need to monkey with those valves in the last 17+ years of owning the coach. If one of my ride height valves goes TU then a tow plus repair at a truck shop will be my plan. Besides, if you plan to replace a ride height valve you need to carry all of the tools and equipment to accomplish that while on the side of the highway.

JMHO


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Bobbyboy

This is the ISL;  07 engine and never has done this before.  Do not lose any boost with the red light on.  I started it this morning and it ran for about 10 minutes then the red light came on.  Tried to call Cummins in New Orleans but all I got was answer machine.  Left a message but have not heard back yet.  Oh and I have 75,000  miles on the coach.  It has been a great coach with no problems until now and I wish I knew how big of a problem this is cause I ran it on the hwy yesterday up to 75mph with no problem.

 

Bob L

Jim:  That is a possibility  Where are the resistors located on your coach;  I have an 08 dynasty

 

Bob L


On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow

If you are ready my thread on what parts to carry, it sounds like the days of the Wild West are alive and well when it comes to repairs on the road. 
 

Let me hear your stories, and don’t hold back on $$$$ and time lost.

I’ve read a lot of threads on $5k Capps pumps. 


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
JDCrow
3 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

JD,

By the way, after reading your post once again, i really don't think it is necessary to carry Ride Height Adjuster Valves. I haven had the need to monkey with those valves in the last 17+ years of owning the coach. If one of my ride height valves goes TU then a tow plus repair at a truck shop will be my plan. Besides, if you plan to replace a ride height valve you need to carry all of the tools and equipment to accomplish that while on the side of the highway.

JMHO

Good to know. I’ve read some people do carry them, and then this popped up in my YouTube 

 

https://youtu.be/lQRD_mAt3PE


On the road shop horror stories
Romeo84

I'll start, not that bad but we broke down due to a clogged fuel filter. Coasted into a loves truck stop that had a sevice bay. Which was completely useless. Had to unload the car and drive to a napa 30 minutes away to get the right filter which in turn was not the clogged filter. Was my racor 300 200 prefilter. All in all we spent the night at a truck stop and then made it home. 1 day about $70

... so far


On the road shop horror stories
Rick A

Never had to do a repair on the road. Grateful about this, but always try to preempt trouble!


On the road shop horror stories
ktloah

Like Rick, I try to head off potential problems before they become problems....do most of my own repairs....


On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow
12 minutes ago, Rick A said:

Never had to do a repair on the road. Grateful about this, but always try to preempt trouble!

That’s where I’m at. Tearing most of it apart so that I know what it’s all about and that I know what’s been fixed and/or replaced. 


CCC thermostat
Dr4Film

Gary,

You cannot use the old board from a Penguin to run a new Penguin-II on your 5 button CCC. You have to purchased a conversion board (Dometic 3313107.107) to install into the new Penguin-II, cost about $150. Then you have to setup the DIP switches correctly and also cut some wires per specific instructions.

My advice is to replace all the rooftop AC's at the same time along with the new CCC-2 ten button thermostat.


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
Ray Davis
48 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

5 amp Smart Battery Charger 120 VAC with extension cord.

I take those too and have used it for myself as well as to help others.  In addition I carry a set of 20ft jumper cables.

My tools are so heavy I worry about the bottom falling through.  Occasionally they come in handy.  I had the dash light up and alarms go off when a pressure switch    blew apart on the rear tank.  There was a smaller truck stop right there so I could pull in. Found a spot where I could crawl under and diagnose the problem.            Fortunately a NAPA store was 25mi back and had a replacement part.  A couple of hours plus $30 and we were rolling again. 

Having a toad sure came in handy that day.


Mac/air valve replaced and I have an issue.
Dr4Film

My MAC Valve is in the same location as JimJ 02 Windsor, on the firewall above the Generator.


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
96 EVO
13 minutes ago, Ray Davis said:

 

Having a toad sure came in handy that day.

Yep, sometimes it doubles as a life raft.


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
Mike H

I now carry a roll of Flexseal tape for an emergency plumbing leak.  It has saved me in the past.  I also carry a 50amp extension power cord and extra fresh water and sewer hose for those 'Pull-Thru' campsites that feel the need to place all of their utility connections at the far back end of their sites.  I had to dig my spare power cable out last week for the Inland Harbor RV Campground along I-95 in Ga.  Fortunately I only needed to connect to power for the one night.


TriMark electric compartment door locks
96 EVO

After installing a new door keypad, and module, still having issues 🙁!

Speaking with Kevin at TriMark technical support, and telling him which wires are clipped at the connectors, he is less than impressed with the way Monaco installed their system. Basically doomed to fail, and quite surprised it worked as long as it did!


Overheating
Mel S - '96 Safari
On 7/5/2021 at 7:39 AM, Chargerman said:

In many cases a dirty radiator is only really evident outside of the fan diameter in the corners and a along the edges. Using the safe Simple Green and a garden hose sprayer usually works fine. I’m hesitant to use a power washer.  As others have mentioned, let the Simple Green set a bit on a cold radiator. Best to take your time and do the procedure a couple times. 

On my rear radiator Safari I find that idling the engine AFTER the solvent application, and WHILE rinsing, results in a much more thorough cleaning.


On the road shop horror stories
Dr4Film

After living Full-Time in the coach for 14+ years plus 7 of those we were constantly traveling around the US & Canada, I have had my share of roadside emergencies. That's why my VERY first road travel recommendation is to have Coach-Net in your back pocket. My coach and 30 foot trailer have been towed three different times, one in Oregon, once in Northern British Columbia and once in Virginia. Of those three the most expensive tow was while sitting on the Cassier highway coming from Alaska in the middle of nowhere with no mobile signal. Had to drive the car back north 40 miles to get to a satellite phone to call in for ERS. Nearest recovery truck shop that could handle my coach & trailer was over 200 miles away. They arrived around 3 pm, had everything ready to go by 6 pm and arrived at the truck repair shop by 11 pm. I ask the driver what I would have had to pay for that tow and it was over $7000 but all that I gave them was my signature and a VERY big thank you.

I've had bad fuel in Yukon, blown trailer tires in Canada & Kentucky, blown engine coolant lines in Oregon and Virginia, car jump start in California, broken coolant filter valves thanks to Speedco in LA and NV which Cummins repaired two times. Numerous other services performed all over the country. That's why I gave my second most important thing to carry is a credit card. Rebuilt alternators in Anchorage and Adirondacks, new dash AC compressor, drier, low pressure valve replaced while in Florida and so much more. I also made a post about having my exhaust manifold replaced which Cummins in Orlando wanted over $5000 but found this awesome shop in Orlando just down the road from Josam's that did it for less then $1500.

However, even though the coach looks like it's been through a war zone I always keep it mechanically sound and ready to travel.

This winter I want to add the FASS Fuel pump to alleviate having to replace the CAPS fuel system possibly.


On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow
5 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

After living Full-Time in the coach for 14+ years plus 7 of those we were constantly traveling around the US & Canada, I have had my share of roadside emergencies. That's why my VERY first road travel recommendation is to have Coach-Net in your back pocket. My coach and 30 foot trailer have been towed three different times, one in Oregon, once in Northern British Columbia and once in Virginia. Of those three the most expensive tow was while sitting on the Cassier highway coming from Alaska in the middle of nowhere with no mobile signal. Had to drive the car back north 40 miles to get to a satellite phone to call in for ERS. Nearest recovery truck shop that could handle my coach & trailer was over 200 miles away. They arrived around 3 pm, had everything ready to go by 6 pm and arrived at the truck repair shop by 11 pm. I ask the driver what I would have had to pay for that tow and it was over $7000 but all that I gave them was my signature and a VERY big thank you.

I've had bad fuel in Yukon, blown trailer tires in Canada & Kentucky, blown engine coolant lines in Oregon and Virginia, car jump start in California, broken coolant filter valves thanks to Speedco in LA and NV which Cummins repaired two times. Numerous other services performed all over the country. That's why I gave my second most important thing to carry is a credit card. Rebuilt alternators in Anchorage and Adirondacks, new dash AC compressor, drier, low pressure valve replaced while in Florida and so much more. I also made a post about having my exhaust manifold replaced which Cummins in Orlando wanted over $5000 but found this awesome shop in Orlando just down the road from Josam's that did it for less then $1500.

However, even though the coach looks like it's been through a war zone I always keep it mechanically sound and ready to travel.

This winter I want to add the FASS Fuel pump to alleviate having to replace the CAPS fuel system possibly.

One of my first mods, the FASS. 


On the road shop horror stories
Tom Wallis

I guess I'm not alone but I've never broke down on the road. But I suppose I have an unfair advantage being a retired mechanic. The worst on the road repair I've ever had to make was a u-joint in my pick-up truck when we had a trailer. With over 100,000 miles of RVing, none of my rigs have ever been in a shop. We are blessed though, it could happen some day.


Overheating
Mel S - '96 Safari

Here's how to tell if your cleaning job is effective:

Every passage in this radiator is blowing bubbles, (engine at idle):

May be an image of outdoors


09 HR Navigator
jcavataio5255

Hi Don,

It appears there’s a 5amp fuse/ circuit breaker that feeds 12v to the red hat and Auto-Fill module, if that’s ok and the switch is functional ?? the Auto-Fill Module located on the front wall of the wet bay either has a bad connection or the module failed???
image.thumb.jpg.a9c56f92b84247a4f22df6d2f18317f5.jpg

Hope this helps?

John C

2009 Navagator 


Hill climbing
Gary Cole

There was an interesting topic on another forum discussing a new owners complaint that his ISL 400 Cummins lacked power when climbing steep grades. Not being a member I didn't comment. However, I was surprised at the number of people who recommended that he approach grades at full rpm with pedal to the metal and keep it that way during the entire climb. Perhaps gaining a minute or two in the process. Not to mention consuming fuel like he had a hole in his tank. My comment would have been that making a habit of operating a diesel engine in that manner would be the best diagnostic tool available if one was intent on eventually discovering a hidden, potentially  catastrophic, weakness in an engine or transmission. A flaw which otherwise might have remained unknown for the life of the coach.


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Hypoxia
This one is by the engine (ISX) and the other one is in the driver side console at the forward end.
 

Terminating Resistor_LI.jpg


Hill climbing
John Haggard
10 minutes ago, Gary Cole said:

There was an interesting topic on another forum discussing a new owners complaint that his ISL 400 Cummins lacked power when climbing steep grades. Not being a member I didn't comment. However, I was surprised at the number of people who recommended that he approach grades at full rpm with pedal to the metal and keep it that way during the entire climb. Perhaps gaining a minute or two in the process. Not to mention consuming fuel like he had a hole in his tank. My comment would have been that making a habit of operating a diesel engine in that manner would be the best diagnostic tool available if one was intent on eventually discovering a hidden, potentially  catastrophic, weakness in an engine or transmission. A flaw which otherwise might have remained unknown for the life of the coach.

Your correct.

These are not car's 

Many diesel techs never recommended full throttle operation.

I have never used a full throttle position. 

With any diesel 

Tractor trailer rig or our rv.


Overheating
Toddgoodwin

UPDATE:. First, thank you for the responses!  I opened the hatch and was starting to check out the light coming through the radiator when I noticed about a 4"x4" area in the lower right corner covered in little papers and general filth.  Other side I pulled out a Dorito bag.  Can't believe it!  Also the radiator was grimy.  I got all the paper, leaves and trash out, thoroughly soaked it in Simple Green and left for 20 minutes.  Rinsed it thoroughly and a ton of grime hit the ground.  Started her up afterwards and it blew bubbles for a few minutes. 

One question: Is it normal to have a space in the middle that has a little less air flow at idle?  I figured there probably is a little less because of no fan blades in the center.  


On the road shop horror stories
JDCrow
44 minutes ago, Tom Wallis said:

I guess I'm not alone but I've never broke down on the road. But I suppose I have an unfair advantage being a retired mechanic. The worst on the road repair I've ever had to make was a u-joint in my pick-up truck when we had a trailer. With over 100,000 miles of RVing, none of my rigs have ever been in a shop. We are blessed though, it could happen some day.

Awesome! It pays to have a working knowledge, though I feel most who own coaches are ahead of the game or learn fast about how things work 


Hill climbing
Rick A

Wow, that’s silly. How about just going down a gear, and maintaining speed with a few more revs. Amazingly that’s what Allison tranny recommend. 
isn’t that what gears are for? What am I missing? 
 


Hill climbing
wpools

That is really unfortunate.  As we all know, bad advice is always worse than no advice. 
I agree with Rick A.  Gears?


Air bag discharge
Nevada Rob
2 hours ago, cbr046 said:

Can you describe your technique?  Finding leaks I'm not worried about.  HOW TO FIX THEM I'm a little fuzzy.  Do your just tighten the fittings 1/8 turn?  Teflon tape?  Replacing valves? 

tia,

- bob

I attached my shop compressor to the front air inlet fitting so as not to run the engine for an air supply. It is already 9,000 degrees here at home so anything I can do to keep the undercarriage cooler the better. I drive the coach up on wood ramps I made in order to raise up the front or back of the coach in order to get my old broke down butt under the motorhome and have some room to work. With a fully charged air system spray a generous amount of soap/water solution on all the fitting and valves. I use Dawn dish soap and water. Once I found the problem areas I drained the air system. If the leaking fitting was part of the air leveling system then when you remove the air line the bag will drop. With the coach up on the wood ramps I can still get under the coach even with the bags completely deflated. Removed the old dried out quick connect fittings, clean the female receiving threads and install the new brass fittings. I had two leaks on two pressure regulators on the front primary tank. The regulator body threaded together in two pieces. The upper and lower halves just need to be tighten back together. I do not use Teflon tape. I only use pipe thread paste. Teflon tape is nice and some folks use it. I have never had thread paste leak whereas I have had to redo Teflon. I only want to do this once so the extra effort and time is well worth for me. I just ordered a really cool tool to get the old push connect fitting off/released from the tubing. The tool is not cheap but after smashing my hand into the air tank, worth it to me. You can search for a quick connect fitting release tool. I found a set on Amazon for about $140.

 


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Bobbyboy

Jim:  That is a possibility  Where are the resistors located on your coach;  I have an 08 dynasty

 

Bob L

Thanks Jim:  Found them.  In same place as yours  Thanks,

 

Bob L


Hill climbing
Dr4Film

I guess you guys must travel a lot in Florida where the highest elevation is maybe 350 feet above sea-level.

I have climbed many mountains both east and west of the Rockies, Canadian Rockies, all through Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and Alaska and there have been many times that to keep the engine revving at about 2000 rpm's it requires that the fuel treadle be completely at the maximum. This has been while hauling a 30 foot 11,000 lb cargo trailer too.

There is one mountain that we climbed in Jasper National Park on the Ice Fields Parkway on our way to the Columbia Ice Field where I was at full throttle climbing at 12 mph in first gear for over 3 minutes. I defy any one with an ISB or ISC to not climb that mountain towing anything without having your pedal to the floor.

For those exact road conditions is why I highly recommend having an Exhaust Temperature Gauge (EGT) to monitor the temp making sure that it stays below 1250F.


Overheating
Chargerman

Glad to hear that you got it clean. Yes it’s normal to have less airflow in the center and also the corners. Hopefully it will run a bit cooler for you now. It’s a good habit as part of your annual maintenance to give the radiator a cleaning. 


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
OhReally

Bobbyboy, hope this helps a bit.

The reason you see the light flashing light or the light comes on intermittently is likely a partially stuck actuator. It does it's job on the turbo when driving conditions demand it. No demand, no vgt function and no error light; intermittent light, intermittent demand. 

It is possible that the vgt actuator is not moving along it's entire range of motion and that is why you don't always see the error. The demand is satisfied within the current range of motion of the vgt sometimes and therefore an error is not always seen.

Here is a link to a YouTube video that may provide some more insight to Cummins vgt problems. This guy screwed up his initial vgt calibration when he worked on his turbocharger, but if yours hasn't been worked on you may simply have a partially stuck movement. Good luck.

https://www.google.com/search?q=vgt+actuator&oq=vgt+actuator&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60l3.7231j0j4&client=ms-android-motorola-rev2&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8#


VGT actuator; Diagnostic Code 2636
Frank McElroy

Bob, on your ISL the electronic turbo actuator communicates back and forth with the engine ECM.  The engine ECM will command a certain turbo position and the sensor inside the turbo will tell the engine ECM the actual turbo position . 

If you log into Cummins Quick Serve (no cost for this), you can look up the troubleshooting procedure to follow.  My hunch is a bad electrical connection on the electronic turbo actuator, a bad connection on the engine ECM or the turbo wiring harness was heat damaged due to incorrect routing around the turbo.


Hill climbing
Soybean

Some information posted here at times is. wives tales. Diesel engines are designed to be used. If anyone has set at a construction site and watched they would see lots of equipment runs wide open all day long, big generators or water pumps may run that way for months at a time. When a 250000 generator runs that way it is hard to believe running wide open hurts them. Farm equipment is used the same way. Ask a good diesel mechanic what is the hardest thing on a diesel engine. If he really knows he will say idling for long periods of time. Have been heavy equipment mechanic for 40 years so have a little knowledge about diesels

 

 


Hill climbing
John Haggard
2 hours ago, John Haggard said:

Your correct.

These are not car's 

Many diesel techs never recommended full throttle operation.

I have never used a full throttle position. 

With any diesel 

Tractor trailer rig or our rv.

I certainly do shift down manually on steep hills. 

Like the one north of Chattanooga on 111

North of sody daisy

Pulling my trailer with a jeep and harley behind.

The 500 hp ISM says cool and collected on the 15 minute climb North bound.

Running at 22 hundred rpm.

Even when shifted down to first at 3/4th throttle 

You don't go any faster at full throttle, I  assure you.

 

We pull that mountain range both ways 2 times a year. South of Cookeville Tennessee. 

I have family south of Denver.

Breakfast at Salida, then 

We ski monarch a few days then go on over to Crested Bute. 

So we have done the pulls. 

 


On the road shop horror stories
Ivylog

Got back to Montana from Canada and next morning could no go over 45 mph. Changed both fuel filters on the 400 ISL/caps engine and filled up… no difference. Made it to a CG in Columbia Falls and Cummins could get to me in 2 weeks… found a big truck repair 5 miles away that could fit me in. Liked the mechanic and we decided to replace the lift pump because of low pressure. Cummins had the lift pump and said I didn’t have to replace the base will all the fuel lines… not true.

Test drove Friday afternoon and same problem. Over the weekend I Googled the code:

1 …change fuel filters…done. 

2…check for air in the fuel. $10 of fittings and clear plastic tubing, air in the fuel could be seen. Started at the tank trying to tighten the main fuel line before taking off. Pulled dip tube looking  for a hole even though the tank was full. Put back in and replaced the hose, not as tight as when I took it off. Checked for air and there was none. Test drove and problem solved. 
Monday went back to truck place to finish paying and parked away from the shop. Mechanic said “I knew you’d fix it, what was it?” Air in the fuel at the fitting at the tank. He said in the fall this was not unusual but not in the summer. The fuel tank coming out of Canada was almost empty so the fuel was very hot. The next morning it was in the low 40s….a 100 degree change. Never had this problem again.

I now know changing the lift pump was a dumb thing to do, as it only runs for 30 seconds to help in starting the engine. Sorry, but I would include adding a FASS pump in the same category.  


On the road shop horror stories
Ron Jones

Trying to guess at what you will need is simply impossible. Plan your trip so IF you break down, you are not obligated to be somewhere else or it's something that can be cancelled. That way two things can happen... First, buy the part you need since you won't have to guess what it is. (Do your shopping on the web and they will ship it or bring it to you.) Second, have an RV tech (maybe back home) on speed dial and they might be able to order for you. Then just set there and wait for the part. I also recommend getting some emergency road service coverage. (I use Coachnet - I do NOT sell it)


Taking a long trip, what parts to bring along
redstickbill

JD,

Others have replied to the spare parts question, so nothing new from me. The one thing Geri and I learned from our 15 years of fulltiming is that there are grocery stores just about everywhere, no reason to overload on groceries. Extra bottled water is always a good idea.

Bill B 07 Dynasty


Hill climbing
Gary Cole

I wasn't suggesting that our engines were not capable of full throttle operation. I routinely use full throttle when passing or climbing a short grade when I feel that more power would prevent a downshift. Transmission downshifts are not entirely free of wear and tear. Many years ago I was contemplating the purchase of a new truck with a Detroit 8V 92 engine. Detroit provided a spreadsheet which showed that the engine, when set at full rated horsepower, had a 40% shorter mean time between overhauls than when the engine was set at its lowest factory horsepower and rpm setting. In those days overhauls typically meant mean time between catastrophic failures such as broken crankshafts, dropped valves, piston separation, broken rods sticking through blocks, etc. Diesel engines have come a long way since then. 

I agree with Richard that a pyrometer is a good indicator of engine load and added one to my rv. I also use an engine oil temperature gauge as it indicates the real long term operating temp of the engine and whether it is tracking up or down. 


Hill climbing
Ivylog

Lugging a turbo Diesel engine is harder on it than keeping the rpms close to the max. Exhaust gas temps will be higher and your cooling will be less at lower rpms. 
Only in the RV world is babying a Diesel engine the thing to do. 


Hill climbing
96 EVO

Hi RPM's doesn't nessesarily mean full throttle.

I have a 400 ISL, and climb many mountain grades in 3rd gear, 2000 rpm's, and boost pressure about 25in.

If I shifted to 4th, my rpm's would be in the 1500 range, but my boost pressure may be up around 33in.

So, which gear is easier on the drivetrain, and burning less fuel.


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