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HWH leveling question


MSHappyCampers

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I have always dumped the air before leveling in order to put the entry door step as low to the ground as possible.  I was just reading the HWH Text Book in the files section and found the following statement.

Pressing the AIR button one time turns the system on. The AIR LEVEL light will be on steady. The "TRAVEL" light will be out. The four red WARNING lights will be on and one or two yellow LEVEL lights may be on. DO NOT dump all the air from the air bags at this time. Allow the system to level the vehicle from travel height.

Anyone have any comments on this?  Thanks! 🙂

Joe

 

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I have the HWH air leveling and I follow what my coach's manual instructs.  The HWH Text Book (didn't know there was one) I assume is generic.  I press the AIR button once to turn it on, then press it again to begin the process.  I rarely have to manually level it.  All according to the manual.  I agree that you shouldn't dump all of your air prior to leveling.  The system will make adjustment over the following days as you go in and out and about the coach.  My coach will eventually settle down low, but still be level, after several days.

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Joe,

The manual is correct. The leveling process for the HWH goes like this: Coach in ride height, slides deployed, HWH auto activated, coach will dump air as needed to level coach first and may raise the coach also depending on whether the rear has run out of room or not. As time goes on the coach will dump or add air, that's when the the small HWH air compressor comes into play to keep the coach at its level state if air is needed.

My HWH auto leveling puck sensor is out of calibration and needs to be adjusted because whenever I do an AUTO level I always need to put it into manual then tweak it to meet my expectations. I have just been procrastinating over the years and have always leveled manually. My auxiliary HWH air compressor had not worked for many years. I just replaced it this past summer and relocated it to be better protected against the elements and for easier servicing too.

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8 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

Joe,

The manual is correct. The leveling process for the HWH goes like this: Coach in ride height, slides deployed, HWH auto activated, coach will dump air as needed to level coach first and may raise the coach also depending on whether the rear has run out of room or not. As time goes on the coach will dump or add air, that's when the the small HWH air compressor comes into play to keep the coach at its level state if air is needed.

My HWH auto leveling puck sensor is out of calibration and needs to be adjusted because whenever I do an AUTO level I always need to put it into manual then tweak it to meet my expectations. I have just been procrastinating over the years and have always leveled manually. My auxiliary HWH air compressor had not worked for many years. I just replaced it this past summer and relocated it to be better protected against the elements and for easier servicing too.

Richard, where is the aux compressor located on our 2002 Windsors?  I think mine is working OK but would like to know exactly where to find it, just in case!

I plan to call HWH Monday to ask about the dumping before leveling.  It works fine and I really like the step to be low to the ground!  Thanks!

Joe

 

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1 minute ago, MSHappyCampers said:

Richard, where is the aux compressor located on our 2002 Windsors?  I think mine is working OK but would like to know exactly where to find it, just in case!

Joe, it is bolted to a bracket hanging from the frame just aft of the front axle directly in front of the bay that holds the fuel/LPG tanks. I relocated it to inside the fuel/LPG bay.

I had posted the project on the old Yahoo Monacoers site with photos but that is long gone now. I still have a copy of that post in my email file. I will re-post it here for interested members.

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6 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

Joe, it is bolted to a bracket hanging from the frame just aft of the front axle directly in front of the bay that holds the fuel/LPG tanks. I relocated it to inside the fuel/LPG bay.

I had posted the project on the old Yahoo Monacoers site with photos but that is long gone now. I still have a copy of that post in my email file. I will re-post it here for interested members.

I would like to see it!  Thanks!

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  • 4 months later...

OK guys, sorry about being late with this request as it totally slipped my mind with all that's been going on the past months.

I have attached two photos of the old HWH Air Compressor which sits up high on a platform to the rear of the front axle just in front of the first bay containing the diesel and LPG tanks.

The post below is a copy of the follow-up post I had made after completing the project including photos of the new compressor and rebuilt platform.

HWH Air Compressor-1.jpg

HWH Air Compressor-2.jpg

Here is a re-post of my HWH Air Compressor project which I had done back last summer while Workamping up in New Hampshire.

Hi Folks,

Just to close out this thread with a follow-up, some photos and description of what I did to relocate the failed air compressor for the HWH Air Leveling System.

After the complete unit was removed from under the coach where it was housed in a cage just to the rear of the front axle (VERY poor location - what were they thinking????) I removed the defective air compressor, relay and pressure switch. I then verified that the air/moisture spitter valve still worked by hooking it to a 12 VDC battery. I removed the filter above the valve and that did not need any further maintenance so I replaced it without any maintenance. I then cleaned up the base and proceeded to install the three new components.

I had previously purchased a new air compressor, Viar Model 450C, an Emerson Relay Model 120-105711 and a Viar Pressure Switch Model 90100 which is On @ 90 psi / Off @ 120 psi. All three were obtained from Amazon.

I also purchased 10 feet of 3/8 air line, one air-line union-coupling, some wire and split loom from the local NAPA store.

I extended the two wires using crimp connectors and heat shrink. I installed the air-line coupling onto the line coming from the rear of the coach that goes to the rear 6 pack valves and also hooked it to one end of the new air-line. I then removed the old short air-line coming from the front 6-pack valves and attached the other end of the new air-line to the 6-pack valve. I used spilt-loom to cover all of the wires and air-lines for protection. All of those extensions were routed through a chassis frame which went directly into the adjacent bay where the diesel fuel and LPG tanks were located and where the new location will be for the air compressor.

I had previously constructed a wooden shelf over the passenger side of the LPG tank which will hold the air compressor unit. The Viar Air Compressor came with rubber isolators but I added the springs that were used on the old Thomas Air Compressor to the mounting also. I also used some new springs between the base of the unit and the shelf to help further isolate and help dampen any vibrations coming from the compressor. I positioned the complete unit so it was easily accessible for routine maintenance if needed. Due to my installation of the compressor unit onto the wooden shelf I installed a ground wire from the metal base of the unit to the chassis to form the ground needed to run the system.

I have attached photos of the rebuilt base unit installed in its final resting place.

I am VERY pleased with the outcome and appreciate all of the help from my Workamper neighbor who was hired to do all of the work under the coach while I assisted him from outside with tools and materials.

I am now able to re-level the coach without having to start up the engine to air up the system plus I no longer will have to worry about the air compressor failing once again from exposure to the elements, road debris and whatever it was exposed to in its previous location.

Richard S.

02 Windsor PBT

Saco River Area Campground

North Conway NH

IMG_1753.JPG

IMG_1754.JPG

IMG_1755.JPG

IMG_1756.JPG

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7 hours ago, Dr4Film said:

OK guys, sorry about being late with this request as it totally slipped my mind with all that's been going on the past months.

I have attached two photos of the old HWH Air Compressor which sits up high on a platform to the rear of the front axle just in front of the first bay containing the diesel and LPG tanks.

The post below is a copy of the follow-up post I had made after completing the project including photos of the new compressor and rebuilt platform.

HWH Air Compressor-1.jpg

HWH Air Compressor-2.jpg

Here is a re-post of my HWH Air Compressor project which I had done back last summer while Workamping up in New Hampshire.

Hi Folks,

Just to close out this thread with a follow-up, some photos and description of what I did to relocate the failed air compressor for the HWH Air Leveling System.

After the complete unit was removed from under the coach where it was housed in a cage just to the rear of the front axle (VERY poor location - what were they thinking????) I removed the defective air compressor, relay and pressure switch. I then verified that the air/moisture spitter valve still worked by hooking it to a 12 VDC battery. I removed the filter above the valve and that did not need any further maintenance so I replaced it without any maintenance. I then cleaned up the base and proceeded to install the three new components.

I had previously purchased a new air compressor, Viar Model 450C, an Emerson Relay Model 120-105711 and a Viar Pressure Switch Model 90100 which is On @ 90 psi / Off @ 120 psi. All three were obtained from Amazon.

I also purchased 10 feet of 3/8 air line, one air-line union-coupling, some wire and split loom from the local NAPA store.

I extended the two wires using crimp connectors and heat shrink. I installed the air-line coupling onto the line coming from the rear of the coach that goes to the rear 6 pack valves and also hooked it to one end of the new air-line. I then removed the old short air-line coming from the front 6-pack valves and attached the other end of the new air-line to the 6-pack valve. I used spilt-loom to cover all of the wires and air-lines for protection. All of those extensions were routed through a chassis frame which went directly into the adjacent bay where the diesel fuel and LPG tanks were located and where the new location will be for the air compressor.

I had previously constructed a wooden shelf over the passenger side of the LPG tank which will hold the air compressor unit. The Viar Air Compressor came with rubber isolators but I added the springs that were used on the old Thomas Air Compressor to the mounting also. I also used some new springs between the base of the unit and the shelf to help further isolate and help dampen any vibrations coming from the compressor. I positioned the complete unit so it was easily accessible for routine maintenance if needed. Due to my installation of the compressor unit onto the wooden shelf I installed a ground wire from the metal base of the unit to the chassis to form the ground needed to run the system.

I have attached photos of the rebuilt base unit installed in its final resting place.

I am VERY pleased with the outcome and appreciate all of the help from my Workamper neighbor who was hired to do all of the work under the coach while I assisted him from outside with tools and materials.

I am now able to re-level the coach without having to start up the engine to air up the system plus I no longer will have to worry about the air compressor failing once again from exposure to the elements, road debris and whatever it was exposed to in its previous location.

Richard S.

02 Windsor PBT

 

Saco River Area Campground

 

North Conway NH

 

IMG_1753.JPG

IMG_1754.JPG

IMG_1755.JPG

IMG_1756.JPG

Richard,

I would like to ask you a question about this post. Please send me an email to; ackermanenter at aol dot com. I have not been able to locate your email address.  CRS at 86.

Paul A

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  • 2 months later...

An excellent thought except for all of the electrical wiring and air line extensions that would be needed to accomplish that task.

They really didn't build these coaches for easy maintenance and preventative maintenance or even sometimes getting to a part that is almost impossible or in fact impossible to reach without tearing everything apart.

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I just finished replacing all the o-rings in all three of the six packs this week and it appears I have a new leak on the rear left.   It has to be a piston seal leaking, as I see no leaks on any of the solenoids.    I guess it’s time to build a test fixture to test each solenoid, argh!   I’ve thought about putting the rear six packs under the bed, I bet the hoses and wires would be long enough, the space is almost directly above them.

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Yes, I did all three on each one.   I’m talking about the little blue seal on the end of each of the solenoid pistons.   It’s one more spot air can leak on them, some people have written about refacing them with a lathe.   I’ve also been following a thread about similarities to nitros solenoids, and some of the nitros supply houses for racing sale  similar pistons.   I haven’t found any listings that show dimensions of their pistons, but I may call next week and find out more.  It would be nice to have all 18 solenoids like new again.

I’m so tired of dealing with air leaks, I replaced the parking brake valve and one of the tank drain valves that were leaking last week as well.

 

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Thanks, Granville!

I am now questioning whether it would be easier and more cost effective and less time consuming to just spend the bucks for a brand new 6-Pack Manifold ($794), remove the old one on the rear to rebuild completely and test using a 12 VDC battery and an air compressor. Then remove the old one on the front to rebuild and install the rebuilt one back onto the coach in the front. Once the second old one has been rebuilt and tested it would become my "spare".

Any opinions?

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There’s not much other than the solenoids that goes wrong with the manifolds, I’ve never had a fitting or pressure switch leaking.   There are some check valves on the side of them that I would think could leak.  I’m not sure of their function though.

 

i actually bought a spare six pack just for the solenoids about 8-10 years ago on eBay.   That’s been my spare parts supply, and it’s been real handy lately with the coils starting to die.  I’m going to use it to make the test jig.   I just wish i could find 18 new pistons and springs for about 10 bucks a piece.     


If we only knew which of these would fit:  

 

https://wilson-manifolds.myshopify.com/collections/solenoids/products/nitrous-fuel-solenoid-rebuild-kits


i found this on amazon, a little pricey though... 

Nitrous Express 15740 Fuel Solenoid Piston https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001GBHWN0/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_acoEFb3Y418TF

 

I ordered one of these, at least it will tell me if they are about the same size.  
 

Nitrous Express 15733 Solenoid Maintenance Wrench https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001GBJOPE/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_7ioEFbRHVGTPS

Edited by granvillebarker
Left out something.
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2 hours ago, Dr4Film said:

Thanks, Granville!

I am now questioning whether it would be easier and more cost effective and less time consuming to just spend the bucks for a brand new 6-Pack Manifold ($794), remove the old one on the rear to rebuild completely and test using a 12 VDC battery and an air compressor. Then remove the old one on the front to rebuild and install the rebuilt one back onto the coach in the front. Once the second old one has been rebuilt and tested it would become my "spare".

Any opinions?

QUestion, I heard all the solenoids are the same (RAP1940?).  But are all three manifolds the same, front, drive and tag?

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2 hours ago, rpasetto said:

QUestion, I heard all the solenoids are the same (RAP1940?).  But are all three manifolds the same, front, drive and tag?

I know one of them has an extra pressure switch, and I think one has smaller air lines connecting to the back, but I’m not 100% sure on that.   The solenoids are all the same on mine.

 

You know on the little air compressor, mine always stopped because the motor brushes would get dirty and stop touching.    I’ve cleaned them many times.   That new air compressor you got doesn’t have brushes, so it probably would have worked fine under the coach where the old one was.

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12 hours ago, granvillebarker said:

You know on the little air compressor, mine always stopped because the motor brushes would get dirty and stop touching.    I’ve cleaned them many times.   That new air compressor you got doesn’t have brushes, so it probably would have worked fine under the coach where the old one was.

The location where I chose to install the new AUX Air Compressor unit is VERY easy to get to versus crawling under the coach to work on it. Plus the entire unit is out of harms way from both weather and road debris. The only part that needs routine maintenance is the air dryer filter. However, if ANY part of the unit fails now, I can get at it quickly to repair or replace.

One thing I absolutely hate is crawling under the coach. Age and body mass have taken its toll!

Edited by Dr4Film
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