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Monacoers Daily Digest


Scotty Hutto
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Welcome to Bill D's Monacoers' Daily digest for *|date|*

To view this on the web click here: https://www.monacoers.org/newsletters/issue/553-monacoers-daily-digest/.  To respond to a post, click on the post title to be taken to that topic on the website.

Hello *|member_name|*, 

Here's what the Monacoers were talking about yesterday:

 

Index

Leaking flexible sink drain
cbr046
Leaking flexible sink drain
Ivylog
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
throgmartin
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Ivylog
Towing with the ISC
Ivylog
Re-clocking steering wheel
Ivylog
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
dl_racing427
Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
dl_racing427
Leaking flexible sink drain
jacwjames
Leaking flexible sink drain
Hypoxia
Re-clocking steering wheel
Dave Pumphrey
Leaking flexible sink drain
Dr4Film
Auto Gen Start
Dave Pumphrey
Towing with the ISC
Dr4Film
Leaking flexible sink drain
Xlr8ting1
Auto Gen Start
miacasa_2000
Leaking flexible sink drain
Newcsn
Auto Gen Start
Dave Pumphrey
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
cbr046
Towing with the ISC
Cubflyer
Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
dl_racing427
CA Tahoe Highways Back Ooen
blahargoue
Cut wire from steering column??
veraken
Cut wire from steering column??
Skipjack
Re-clocking steering wheel
Skipjack
Leaking flexible sink drain
Nevada Rob
Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
dl_racing427
Auto Gen Start
Ivan K
Onan 7500 Cooling Sensor
ok-rver
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
sunriseranch2000
Preventing DUVAC alternator problems
Perry Paul
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Dr4Film
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Ivan K
Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Paul A.
Leaking flexible sink drain
Paul A.
Slide won't move in or out.
Steve P

New Posts

Leaking flexible sink drain
cbr046

Cut the straps, remove, fix, then install new straps.

Getting new straps in . . . . ah, that's the trick.  Maybe drill holes on each side of the newly cut strap and pull back together with wire / tie wrap?

My 2c,

- bob

 


Leaking flexible sink drain
Ivylog

I would use 4 large zip ties once fixed… 4th one out on the end of the sliding track to limit the flex at the coupling.


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
throgmartin

For you longtime NASCAR fans you probably remember back in the 90's when the Winston Cup guys were blowing engines during every race. Even the guys with top engine building departments broke motors during races. Then in the late 90's and early 2000's engine blow ups stopped. I started working in Winston Cup in 1993 and retired in 2003. I was a marketing and PR consultant and worked with all the top teams as an independent consulting to the owners and drivers.

One day I was having a conversation with Jack Roush and Robert Yates and the conversation turned to engines and I asked what changed with the engine failures and they both chuckled and said - Mobil 1. Since all of my work centered around doing licensing contracts for drivers, sponsorships and other marketing programs I never had the chance to delve into the mechanical end of Cup racing. But Roush and Yates provided me with a lot of great information. Some was pretty deep and above my paygrade.

They both had large engine departments with engineers that did engine analysis and constant dyno testing. What they found out was that the engine failures was being caused not only from lubricity issues but heat and all of it centered around the valve train. I believe it was the Roush team who started to experiment with Mark Martins motors and discovered Mobil 1 prevented valve train failures. While it is common knowledge that synthetic oils, especially Mobil 1, provides better lubricity it also had another property which saved the valve trains. It carried heat away from the valve train better. So less heat and better lubricity cured the engine failures in Winston Cup engines. Since then I run Mobil 1 in everything I own, except the coach engine. I use Rotella dino oil in the cummins.

I use Mobil 1 in the generator and rear differential. I use Mobil 1 in the truck, tractor, power washer and anything else with an engine. The reason I use Rotella in the coach engine is because I change the oil every year and most times I only have 5,000 miles on it. I also have a Cummins 330 which is known to be one of the most bullet proof engines Cummins ever made. If I owned a 500 or 600 you bet I would use Mobil 1 as both engines have have had known valve train issues.

When it comes to oil discussions I stay clear of them. Mainly because everyone has their own preference and to be honest I could care less what anyone uses for oil. They can run Wesson cooking oil as far as I am concerned. For those who like Dino oil for their coach engines Rotella is the best on the market. I like their additive package. For all other engines Mobil 1 cannot be beat and their other oils such as their heavy synthetic gear oils is excellent.

As a side note to the NASCAR story, when other teams found out about the advantages of Mobil 1 they all switched. But the hilarious part was that many were sponsored by other oil companies - Pennzoil, Quaker State, Valvoline, etc. So the teams did a switcharoo at the shops by emptying out their dino oils and filling them with Mobil 1 to take to the track so the public wouldn't see Mobil 1 jugs sitting around. Being the smart ass I am I walked into Jeff Gordons garage at the track and picked up a Quaker State oil jug, removed the top and smiled and looked at Jeff and said " smells just like Mobil 1 ". Him and the crew all laughed.


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Ivylog

I used to buy Shell Rotella T by the 55 gallons from Sam’s and still use it. Yes, I  oil sample which lets me go 20,000+ miles between oil changes. I’m not into annual oil changes in a engine that works hard…no moisture.

Chris, the valve issue in the ISX is because of acid eating the face of the valve that then breaks off trashing the turbo and often the piston. The valve stem is not breaking plus it’s the intake valve so not heat related. This is happening to all ISX engines and more often in the higher HP ones…600-650HP.


Towing with the ISC
Ivylog

Since you cannot compress a liquid, the amount of fuel getting to the injectors is limited by the gear pump in the injection pump regardless on the psi before the gear pump.

OP, you could have the wife drive the F250 up to the top if you need to go 45.


Re-clocking steering wheel
Ivylog
22 hours ago, McHughes said:

To center the steering wheel on a Monaco you open up the plastic around the base of the steering column, remove the pinch bolt on the u-joint, drop it down, center the wheel, pull it up and re-insert the bolt.  Takes about 10 minutes. 

Finally a correct and easy solution.


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
dl_racing427
38 minutes ago, throgmartin said:

For you longtime NASCAR fans you probably remember back in the 90's when the Winston Cup guys were blowing engines during every race. Even the guys with top engine building departments broke motors during races. Then in the late 90's and early 2000's engine blow ups stopped. I started working in Winston Cup in 1993 and retired in 2003. I was a marketing and PR consultant and worked with all the top teams as an independent consulting to the owners and drivers.

One day I was having a conversation with Jack Roush and Robert Yates and the conversation turned to engines and I asked what changed with the engine failures and they both chuckled and said - Mobil 1. Since all of my work centered around doing licensing contracts for drivers, sponsorships and other marketing programs I never had the chance to delve into the mechanical end of Cup racing. But Roush and Yates provided me with a lot of great information. Some was pretty deep and above my paygrade.

They both had large engine departments with engineers that did engine analysis and constant dyno testing. What they found out was that the engine failures was being caused not only from lubricity issues but heat and all of it centered around the valve train. I believe it was the Roush team who started to experiment with Mark Martins motors and discovered Mobil 1 prevented valve train failures. While it is common knowledge that synthetic oils, especially Mobil 1, provides better lubricity it also had another property which saved the valve trains. It carried heat away from the valve train better. So less heat and better lubricity cured the engine failures in Winston Cup engines. Since then I run Mobil 1 in everything I own, except the coach engine. I use Rotella dino oil in the cummins.

I use Mobil 1 in the generator and rear differential. I use Mobil 1 in the truck, tractor, power washer and anything else with an engine. The reason I use Rotella in the coach engine is because I change the oil every year and most times I only have 5,000 miles on it. I also have a Cummins 330 which is known to be one of the most bullet proof engines Cummins ever made. If I owned a 500 or 600 you bet I would use Mobil 1 as both engines have have had known valve train issues.

When it comes to oil discussions I stay clear of them. Mainly because everyone has their own preference and to be honest I could care less what anyone uses for oil. They can run Wesson cooking oil as far as I am concerned. For those who like Dino oil for their coach engines Rotella is the best on the market. I like their additive package. For all other engines Mobil 1 cannot be beat and their other oils such as their heavy synthetic gear oils is excellent.

As a side note to the NASCAR story, when other teams found out about the advantages of Mobil 1 they all switched. But the hilarious part was that many were sponsored by other oil companies - Pennzoil, Quaker State, Valvoline, etc. So the teams did a switcharoo at the shops by emptying out their dino oils and filling them with Mobil 1 to take to the track so the public wouldn't see Mobil 1 jugs sitting around. Being the smart ass I am I walked into Jeff Gordons garage at the track and picked up a Quaker State oil jug, removed the top and smiled and looked at Jeff and said " smells just like Mobil 1 ". Him and the crew all laughed.

Chris,

I agree completely.  I've been using Mobil 1 in ALL my gasoline engines for decades.
It was cheapened in the 2000's after Mobil sued Castrol and I think other manufacturers for advertising their oils as full synthetic, when in fact they were hydrocracked petroleum based.  Mobil had up till then been a true synthetic oil, with no petroleum distillate base stock at all.

After the lawsuit, they decided it wasn't worth the cost to keep producing true synthetic oil, and changed their formula.

Mobil 1 is still VERY good oil.   I've had multiple cars go over 300,000 miles on it without problems, and I even used it in my Legends road race car, where I'd often see oil temps exceed 350 degrees.

I use Shell Rotella T6 synthetic in my diesel engines, as Mobil 1 isn't formulated for diesels, and the T6 is a great oil at a reasonable price, and is available anywhere.


Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
dl_racing427
On 9/20/2021 at 8:21 PM, Ivan K said:

So the axles with wheels and H-frames were essentially hanging on the airbags. Does not sound like a good thing to do to them as it is the direct opposite of their function, IMO. No idea how much they can take between the 4 of them. The old tires are a story on its own. I would stay away from that shop.

The shocks top out before the airbags, but yes, it's not particularly good for them to be stretched out like that.
I wouldn't worry to much for short term, but wouldn't leave it like that for days.

U usually use the jacks to raise the coach until the bags fully dump, then put stands underneath the frame, and use a small bottle jack to lift the axles themselves to remove the wheels.


Leaking flexible sink drain
jacwjames

If you want to try and remove the trolley you have to move the white plastic tabs, these are actually just locks that keep the post that the base attached to the trolley assembly to.  Here's a blow of a similar trolley.  https://www.amazon.com/Prime-Line-Products-6847-Assembly-Plastic/dp/B000VYIH50/ref=psdc_511278_t2_B002YGQMY6

Move the tab and the lift the wood/pipe and you should be able to move the wheel portion out of the way and the wood/pipe will drop down. 

Built a new house and installed 7 pocket doors, not an expert but know how they work. 

The problem is all of this is assembled with plenty of access.  So not an easy repair.  You'll have to take the threaded coupling out, install a new one, cut the flexible pipe t size and test fit, and then pull it apart and glue it.  Having the pipe fixed to the trolley might make it easier to get it aligned and being able to put pressure on it while  the glue dries. 

 


Leaking flexible sink drain
Hypoxia

It is a pocket door trolley and every manufacturer has a different way to release.  Pocket Door Removal Swisco

That spa hose will do the same thing again if you use it.  Everyone has their favorite hose, I used commercial vacuum hose that are in a carwash.


Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
Ivylog

Many Monaco’s have nylon straps that support the H frame before the socks.


Re-clocking steering wheel
Dave Pumphrey
22 hours ago, McHughes said:

To center the steering wheel on a Monaco you open up the plastic around the base of the steering column, remove the pinch bolt on the u-joint, drop it down, center the wheel, pull it up and re-insert the bolt.  Takes about 10 minutes. 

This will center the wheel, but you should first check to see if the steering box is centered, as mentioned above. Turn wheel lock to lock, center should be the same # of turns each way. If it is not, adjust the drag link to center it first, then center wheel as needed. 


Leaking flexible sink drain
Dr4Film

If it were me, I would do a combination of post #2 & #3.

Cut the straps, repair pipe and use strong zip-ties to re attach.


Auto Gen Start
Dave Pumphrey

Your house batteries should be charging with the engine running. The residential fridge does not pull that much, shoud be able to run overnight without batteries going too low.

I would get them load tested, & find out why they are not being charged by the alternator. 


Towing with the ISC
Dr4Film
13 hours ago, Cubflyer said:

Are you guys running the Banks power pack systems still using the stock "lift pump" (that only runs for a few seconds at engine start)..??

 

Yes, stock lift pump. The factory original lift pump was replaced due to a VERY tiny leak back in 2012 that was discovered by the Cummins shop in Coburg OR when they were replacing a small section of heater hose that failed at the rear top of the engine.

I was not aware of the leak as it wasn't causing any diesel to drip onto the ground. They found it after they hooked up their Insight System to the engine and found codes leading them to look closer at the engine for a potential problem. The pump was leaking onto the top of the starter, never reaching the ground.

After reading Vanwill's post on his installation of the FASS fuel pump and his two BIG reasons for doing it, I plan to have my shop in Orlando install one this winter when they are doing the routine engine service. My main reason for doing it is to protect the integrity of the CAPS Fuel System. I don't need to have a fuel polishing system with extra filters so that part doesn't interest me for now. That can always be done later if I feel a BIG need for it.


Leaking flexible sink drain
Xlr8ting1

I had to ours a couple years ago in a campground. Not a fun job. I just wanted to mention that from looking at the pictures, you can see that the last strap may have played into the breakage of the fitting. There is a step in size between the slip adapter and the hose itself. I would glue a  short piece of paint stir stick or something thick enough to the wooden wedge to compensate for the step in size. That way there won't be undo stress on the hose from the retaining straps. Secondly its important to get the length of hose exactly right. It may or not have been sized correctly from the factory. Either too short or too long will put additional stress on the fittings when the slide is fully extended or fully retracted. Hope that helps. Long arms help too. 


Auto Gen Start
miacasa_2000

thank you all.  As you read in my basic set up it mirrors what Richard provided except my Monaco book said to set charge rate to 100% not 80 % I will change that to 80 but can anyone explain the difference as in.  does 100% hurt the batteries or just waste gen running longer for no gain?  Also my book never gave any recommendations on the start or stop so thank you. Also besides the question above I guess I have 2 more

Ivan you change your settings when plugged in. I use 50 amp when home , campsites , and Fl. wouldn't I just turn the auto start off and not have to reset the settings?

Dave I have a load tester that I only used on single batteries so my question is do I treat them as one and test the load all together or do I have to separate them and test them individually ?

Roy 2003 dynasty 


Leaking flexible sink drain
Newcsn

I recently completed this repair - It was quite the load of fun!

When reinstalling, I purchased 3 large hose clamps from Home Depot & a length of 3/8" rubber fuel hose. I opened the clamps all the way so I could insert the flat end between the trolley & the trolley rails. I split the fuel hose down the center & then wrapped it around the clamp for insulation where it was going to come in contact with the new drain hose. I then reconnected the clamp & tightened down until the whole assembly was sufficiently solid.

Seemed to do the trick!


Auto Gen Start
Dave Pumphrey
17 minutes ago, miacasa_2000 said:

Dave I have a load tester that I only used on single batteries so my question is do I treat them as one and test the load all together or do I have to separate them and test them individually ?

Roy 2003 dynasty 

Separate & test individually. 

Also see if they are charging with engine running, (volt meter), if not, why?


2004 ISC 8.3 Pacbrake Mechanical and electrical/air testing method
ok-rver

Wife drove MH over weekend and I pulled up rear access panel to watch PacBrake in operation. It is working correctly and makes a difference in deceleration of the MH. I am so thankful we did not head off to Portland with the PacBrake not working.  I have seen posts that talk about a two stage exhaust brake. That got me to thinking that maybe those systems used a switch when off the solenoid would not function and you get the braking I had before with a non-functional PacBrake.  When the switch was on, full PacBrake. In the 1,000 miles we drove the MH b4 fixing the brake, the PacBrake was about right when running 65 mph down the hi way to slow just a bit. Anyone have experience along these lines? 

Have been reviewing electrical diagrams to see if there is a way to simulate the ECM asking for PacBrake to see if the brake lights are working. The issue is getting to the terminals with the relay in place. The only other way I can think to test is to have a follower in a car.


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
cbr046

Good story throgmartin and dl_racing427

I'm also a firm believer and use Mobil 1 in all the gas engines.  2003 4-Runner has 340k miles (purchased at 32k), maybe 100k pulling a 2k lb trailer, and still the preferred household vehicle (despite the wife's 2014 Mini Cooper).  I change oil every 15-20k miles.  The 4-Runner doesn't burn or lose oil.  Hard to argue with success. 

And I'm a firm believer in Amsoil and used it in the F53 gasser.  Again, long oil change intervals but more like 10-12k miles.  Drove it until it reached 147k then decided to sell it for the DP.  Motor was still running strong.  If fact the whole coach was in great shape but was a afraid of getting it to 200k and not being able to sell for more than a bag of peanuts.  I got 2 bags for it. 

If you read the blog link in the first thread you'll discover "Old" Rotella, famous for it's zinc content, has less zinc than "New" Rotella.  Mobil 1 isn't near the top of the list in load capacity / film strength as you'd think.  Most of the diesel oils are dino oils and there's a good discussion on zinc on cam lobes in racing engines.  Not good.

The best way to read this article is with a few search words, like diesel, NASCAR, Rotella, whatever.  https://540ratblog.wordpress.com/

Rotella T4 or T6 didn't fare so well.  There's a Mobil 1 Turbo Diesel Truck synthetic.  It's highly ranked but if you read their website it's designed for the pickup diesels.  If you read up on Mobil 1 Delvac 1300 Super (dino) they show a tractor on the label but the performance is well below the synthetic.  Maybe it's target marketing (lots of pickup diesels these days), maybe it's engineered for the smaller engines but I'm leaning toward the oil with the big truck on the label, even though it's dino. 

It's interesting to see the reasons folks choose a particular oil and most aren't science based.  And nobody told me what oil analysis lab they're using.  Is it a secret? 

Best,

- bob

 

 


Dash A/C vs MPG … Fact or Fiction?
Dr4Film

We run both when necessary otherwise it is just the dash AC or Heat.

We will also run the Aqua-Hot for extra heat when needed but that uses the engine heat to keep it warm.

We like riding  in comfort versus being concerned about how much we are spending in diesel.


Towing with the ISC
Cubflyer

Dick B,

I agree, you are correct, solid liquid does not compress.  Having positive pressure on the input of the pump is not intended to increase injector pump output (except that if the pump is not pumping a solid liquid, it's not pumping at 100% designed output) The Capps pump is lubed and cooled by fuel, again, not getting 100% fuel (without air) is not good for it. Having a positive pressure on the input of a pump assures that it is not sucking air

My lift pump gasket was leaking.... like Richard Smith's, without leaking on the ground (with the engine running), I only discovered it leaking while I was troubleshooting another problem that required my turning the ignition key on and off without starting the engine.  The pump would run but the fuel had no where to go except (finally) on the ground.  My theory is, if the gasket leaks fuel out it would leak air in (physics).  

Expecting top performance and reliability out of a pump that is cavitating....? 

Ken 


Dash A/C vs MPG … Fact or Fiction?
Joe Lee

Thank you!


Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
cbr046
1 hour ago, dl_racing427 said:

Usually use the jacks to raise the coach until the bags fully dump, then put stands underneath the frame, and use a small bottle jack to lift the axles themselves to remove the wheels.

That's what I did with the old gasser but with a floor jack.  Get the wheels so they're still on the ground then use the jack to get them barely off the ground.  Makes tire removal / replacement much easier (pretty much no lifting).  But with the DP I'm hard pressed to find a breaker bar large enough for proper lug nut torque.  Oh, there's that budget thing, too. 

- bob


Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
dl_racing427

A torque multiplier will let you remove the lugs easily with a standard 1/2" breaker bar.  You can also use it with a 1/2" torque wrench to torque them properly.


CA Tahoe Highways Back Ooen
blahargoue

FYI: The Caldo fire if finally starting to settle down.  Both Highway 50 and Highway 88 are now open without restriction between Nevada and Central CA in the Lake Tahoe area.


Cut wire from steering column??
veraken

Here is the wiring diagrams for a 2004 Imperial, Scepter, Camelot.  Hope it helps.

2004 HR Imperial Wiring Diagram.pdf


Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
cbr046
3 minutes ago, dl_racing427 said:

A torque multiplier will let you remove the lugs easily with a standard 1/2" breaker bar.  You can also use it with a 1/2" torque wrench to torque them properly.

I was concerned with accuracy on re-torquing.  At a 1:58 ratio that would be 8.62 ft lbs.  Not worried about being 20 ft-lbs off but 100 off could be a problem.  That and I already bought a $150 3/4 drive digital torque adapter! 

And then there's wrasslin' a 100 lb tire.  The F53's were a scant 70. 

- bob


Cut wire from steering column??
Skipjack

Thank you


Re-clocking steering wheel
Skipjack

Thanks for the info.

That is what I will do first


Leaking flexible sink drain
Nevada Rob

Good morning America. I would like to thank everyone for their input and thoughts. I am constantly impressed with the knowledge base and experiences of the folks who are on this forum. I always like to keep things as original as possible. I can cut the straps as a last resort if I do not get the trolley apart. The set of wheels to the rear may be a problem to get reattached. There is a business here in town that sells nothing but hose material in every shape, size and material for commercial applications. I will drop by there today and see what I can find. I think the factory installed piece is a little short. When the slide is in I think the bend at the upper coupling was to severe. There is a ton of room for the pipe to travel into when the slide is closed. A little longer piece would be not problem with clearance issues. The only obstacle with that plan is all the other piping and electrical were zip tied to the drain line. I had to cut 27 zip ties just to get the other utilities away from the drain line. Thank you again everyone for your help. Have a great day.


2002 Dip, first MH to cut our teeth on
Rikadoo

Mornin JD, so in my prior life (before retirement) i used to be a ford diesel tech, 7.3, 6.0, 6.4 and 6.7 , it was kinda wierd watching the vidio of Ron replacing the coolers, espesially in his cut off shorts😂 he didnt miss much when performing that dirty task, and in fact showed me a trick to use… that is if i want to get dirty like that again😂
So if you find yourself with ever needing Ford PN’s let me know i carry all them still in my phone. 

As far as the coolant, usually unless you have a cracked head around a injector cup its just drain an refill.

However if the coolant stinks like old varnish, and you have a swollen coolant recovery tank, then its going to need cylinder heads.

Again your doing great work on the DP, an keep up the great work.


Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
dl_racing427
16 minutes ago, cbr046 said:

I was concerned with accuracy on re-torquing.  At a 1:58 ratio that would be 8.62 ft lbs.  Not worried about being 20 ft-lbs off but 100 off could be a problem.  That and I already bought a $150 3/4 drive digital torque adapter! 

And then there's wrasslin' a 100 lb tire.  The F53's were a scant 70. 

- bob

I was thinking more along a 3/1 or 5/1 multiplier.
If you get within +/- 50lb/ft of spec, you're probably doing better than many tire shops. 😠


Wheel removal and jacking up the coach
Ivan K

With trial and error, I found that with 12lbs on my multiplier I get close to the final torque. But lately I just use a 1/2" air impact to get me within 1/2 turn to 500lbs before final torque setting. It takes very little turning radius to get from say 400 to 500lbs, at least with my lugs.


2002 Dip, first MH to cut our teeth on
JDCrow
40 minutes ago, Rikadoo said:

Mornin JD, so in my prior life (before retirement) i used to be a ford diesel tech, 7.3, 6.0, 6.4 and 6.7 , it was kinda wierd watching the vidio of Ron replacing the coolers, espesially in his cut off shorts😂 he didnt miss much when performing that dirty task, and in fact showed me a trick to use… that is if i want to get dirty like that again😂
So if you find yourself with ever needing Ford PN’s let me know i carry all them still in my phone. 

As far as the coolant, usually unless you have a cracked head around a injector cup its just drain an refill.

However if the coolant stinks like old varnish, and you have a swollen coolant recovery tank, then its going to need cylinder heads.

Again your doing great work on the DP, an keep up the great work.

Awesome thanks very much.  This truck is “de**leted”. But as I mentioned, it’s been sitting. The owner had moved on to a 6.4 450, but went and ordered a new 6.7 after our conversations. He had a super hard time parting with this truck. 
 

We just couldn’t get the oil temp down with flushes. Here’s the oil cooler opened up, it explains it all. 

7AAE185B-E481-4F61-BF66-A6436523AE9F.jpeg

B83A1B06-675B-41B0-882C-A4EB99C41B83.jpeg

D038F457-9EC4-4A45-B69B-534C58CBBD63.jpeg


Auto Gen Start
Ivan K
2 hours ago, miacasa_2000 said:

Ivan you change your settings when plugged in. I use 50 amp when home , campsites , and Fl. wouldn't I just turn the auto start off and not have to reset the settings?

Roy, I only change the Shore Power settings when parked and not in use in or outside my shop since it is only plugged into 20 amp outlet. Or in parks with 30A. Honestly don't know if it even matters since it is only to keep the batteries alive and when I looked yesterday, it took 4 amps in Float. AGS is ON just in case of a long outage but I turn it off when driving so I can operate the gen from my seat without it stopping the gen. Since you have 50A everywhere you go, you have nothing to worry about.


LED Conversion of Fluorescent Tubes - READ CAREFULLY... NOT as SIMPLE or CHEAPER??....
rpasetto
On 8/25/2021 at 5:49 PM, Ivylog said:

 I have not had good luck with the LED strips… many chips stop working in a couple hundred hours. I have a light fixture over the sink with three of 18” fluorescent in it plus another four fluorescent elsewhere. Now that they have some age on them I'm replacing a bulb every couple months so decided to change one over to LED using 48 SMD 5050 LED Panels. Drilled the four pop rivets out to remove the guts of the Fluorescent. There were two ridges that holds the metal cover over these guts. By finding a small enough wire I was able to slide the wire into these notches making for a neat way to hold the wires that power the LED panels. I put four of the LED panels in (peal and stick after cleaning alum surface) and used the existing switch and 12v wires. I would say four LED panels put out the same amount of light as the two 15W bulbs. While I had the cover off the fixture, I drilled a hole under each switch in the translucent plastic panels so I can turn each on/off without taking the cover off. This will let me use just the new LEDs (while boondocking) or one or both of the fluorescent. 
Sorry... No pictures but sliding the new wires into the notches and putting the four LED panels where the guts came from made for a neat and simple DIY project. I would space the four panels evenly over the 18" starting with one at each end. 

Thanks for the tip.  I bought a few of these 48SMD (8x6-self-adhesive) panels from eBay for about ten bucks each.  They came with adapters to plug into dome light dockets which I didn't need.

Used two panels each to convert some bay fluorescents, soldered connectors to leads which then connected to the 12v + and - power and filed the ballasts in my circular file, but kept the ballast covers for mounting the panels.  Here is the setup using two panels on the cover.  Second picture shows the plastic cover re-installed.

Ag2X1KSYwVLLHhBWzCYVVvvZE6r5rUd5g0C86qIuthd71penUqk2d0xF7SKWwNRWqGlyR1KbAYtguIIqudaCnGPHlBmudDqE2Vr8ojq9tn3V5wpGTq465MCfbaGvKN1Zirhr6UQRXNbbhcZCJJjEurRuR0KxxPe9pT83Bz1LVc6aFz1vQFsjhg1dMv4zwepu_HIavyIWnFaZyE5ut9OaCKH7zryIke1f77EP6hNDWfwFB-qzph8a54_KqHG1qncOqtlwZ0jWk_DQsQwKrugJGVhP-TteDHptxRN870yFimaiWNKl6NX3aMXW6z-rFnZcLjlNUwCngHyiITClUoAJOhbtrRXRuaTAM9i9lktMEvdbjaruSylqeFLulmxZY5WIYuqCliCIiDO32oenL-hAK585sthYWDan0vX38LlvHpfC4o3l9YV-YFr1zWClwS8y5i2pnKOAxYo7rtTjq6InaUeGGuo11qJVP3Qb3tvnpBOD66SckAOTJ284-KcamUWa5dVF3M31XY7McPc21bpxV1YNWevnzjxC-QtSlix8TCYXtPu5886l7CHrn7pAg5OfULmAyGFXpwNl2752T345J5kBtbqbHTuahwIOpfcpaJHPYSHDoM2AKgPg7AiVWLX7ZX-QDe4jyMAvmsBNHP_sldShWzCqcQRSVk2TfZfnh6sfmNWjQ8uZUDLba66533zzPHgroJWm98iWlfUGIg5pWlcB=w1378-h565-no?authuser=0

image.png.52ee389ec17c463d6f8168961c1737d4.png 

 


2002 Dip, first MH to cut our teeth on
Rikadoo

Its funny how the 6.4 taught us sooooo much about cooling system issues… that said Mostly everyone is guilty of out of sight out of mind. That is once the hood is shut an the engine starts most people just drive with no regaurd to maintenance intervals. NOTHING would help the 6.4’s! However due to the amount of 6.0’s i have repaired, rather than think repeated flushing to be the answer, my belief would rather be to add a coolant filter perhaps be a more long term resolve. Many people believe that the 6.0 could be made to be bulletproof with just a few modifications… egr cooler or deleate(non-california), remote mounted aftermarket oil cooler, stud kit, free flowing exhaust, cold air intake, or worse yet the cleanable style air filters🤦‍♂️Different type oil, thinking it would solve the stiction problem with injectors. We saw them all, dont get me wrong the 6.0 is a GREAT hiway engine high revs, good HP, the torque only a diesel can give. An matched to the torqueshift automatic transmission was a awsome combination!!!

In the end, it came down to design flaws that couldnt be changed, like lack of headbolts, unlike its big brother the 7.3 which had more bolts per cylinder. 

Sorry didnt mean to rattle on…

Being retired i find i do that more than i ever used to😒

For now my learning is centered around the 8.3, i really enjoy pulling with that engine, getting to know more about it has been fun and rewarding, as well with learning more about the DP in general an doing many of the repairs myself, however what i find is im needing a level surface with more room in which to work on it, bigger truck bigger space😂.

 


2002 Dip, first MH to cut our teeth on
JDCrow
25 minutes ago, Rikadoo said:

Its funny how the 6.4 taught us sooooo much about cooling system issues… that said Mostly everyone is guilty of out of sight out of mind. That is once the hood is shut an the engine starts most people just drive with no regaurd to maintenance intervals. NOTHING would help the 6.4’s! However due to the amount of 6.0’s i have repaired, rather than think repeated flushing to be the answer, my belief would rather be to add a coolant filter perhaps be a more long term resolve. Many people believe that the 6.0 could be made to be bulletproof with just a few modifications… egr cooler or deleate(non-california), remote mounted aftermarket oil cooler, stud kit, free flowing exhaust, cold air intake, or worse yet the cleanable style air filters🤦‍♂️Different type oil, thinking it would solve the stiction problem with injectors. We saw them all, dont get me wrong the 6.0 is a GREAT hiway engine high revs, good HP, the torque only a diesel can give. An matched to the torqueshift automatic transmission was a awsome combination!!!

In the end, it came down to design flaws that couldnt be changed, like lack of headbolts, unlike its big brother the 7.3 which had more bolts per cylinder. 

Sorry didnt mean to rattle on…

Being retired i find i do that more than i ever used to😒

For now my learning is centered around the 8.3, i really enjoy pulling with that engine, getting to know more about it has been fun and rewarding, as well with learning more about the DP in general an doing many of the repairs myself, however what i find is im needing a level surface with more room in which to work on it, bigger truck bigger space😂.

 

Agree, I love the 8.3. This DP loves to pull hard and run and 65mph. Granted it’s short, but it’s very smooth. Only thing I’ve done is the FASS upgrade. Would love to find a used Banks system, but that’s a needle in the preverbal haystack.

I ran 3406B cats in older dump trucks, and loved the low end. It was hard for me not to get a coach with a he 3126, but I did have an 8.3 in an FL80 that was a good truck, though the 9 Speed behind sucked for freeway travel. 

I really loved my 6.4, but always knew I was walking the line heading towards a $15k engine or fuel system bill. That engine pulled hard and was flat kick butt fast. 
 

My 6.7 pulls great, but is very quiet. I miss the rattle and turbo whine. I run Schaffer oil in it, and pull analysis on it every 5000 miles. Kinda jazzed at its design, side mounted oil cooler, short topside down pipes, etc. 

Diesels are a lot of fun, it is sad that they are getting choked with emissions, but it seems that the tech is getting better, though I heard a guy Talk the other day that the def regen is now spitting out an undesirable gas, that has some concerned.  I have looked it up yet. 


Onan 7500 Cooling Sensor
ok-rver

Post is a bit dormant but the newest post on subject so I will add my experience. From a post on IRV2 that I no longer can find, the Gen control has a timer and checks for every thing to be good at a couple of time intervals. Thus the 55 seconds and close to 5 minute shut down. I got the 1/2" npt threaded section of my sensor out with the heat shield in place. 19mm socket and breaker bar to get loose, rachet to finish. the wire going into the sensor small diameter cylinder pulled out as the cylinder was stuck. tried going thru the thermostat opening with small pry bar to push cylinder out but no movement. Per another post, a hole saw was used to drill a 2" diameter hole in the heat shield to give access to the sensor bore. packed the thermostat housing with paper towels and ran a 3/8" drill into the cylinder. bit caught and spun the cylinder out. I expected the thru hole to be about the diameter of the cylinder. after picking away at the crystalized coolant, the hole is the drill diameter (approx) for the thread. vacuumed up all the crystals and installed the new sensor. Mine did not come with a new nut so keep the old one. JB Weld and the corner is now back in place. Some people are pulling their sensor every few years to keep the crystals from locking up the sensor. Another method was to chisel out a slot at one of the bolt holes of the housing that is blocked in place so the thermostat housing could be slide down and be rebuilt. if the threads in the aluminum housing strip out, that might be a good approach. Have 3 hours running since replacement to run cleaner thru system, flush and install coolant, the gen pulled 38 amps this morning with no shutdown. The JB weld is a bit sloppy but not many people will see it under the top panel.

HRS gen temp sensor hole.JPG


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
sunriseranch2000

Fellow Campers,

Here is some info I collected from the group years ago.

   


Re: Oil*

Sun Jun 26, 2016 6:54 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

richoliveria

I WENT BACK AND CLEANED THIS UP TO MAKE IT MORE READABLE. 


Rich O. 


Sorry this is so long, but… 

My name is Norm, and worked at one of the largest transit agencies in the U.S. The last five years I worked on oil analysis and how to extend drive train life on trucks, buses and train cars. I was heavily involved in failure analysis of equipment, and ways of cutting operating costs. Over those years I worked with the labs of two major oil and fuel producers. Utilizing 4 private labs we tested over 12,000 engine, transmission, hydraulic system, differential and more oil samples, and saved countless dollars. I am not that smart, but met many people over those years who are that smart, and had a bad habit of asking way too many questions. I am just hoping to help prolong the life of our equipment. 

1. What is synthetic oil? Why is it better? 


Is it better? Lubricants are a slippery mystery to many people. If I can I will try to clear up a few things. Many think synthetic is the holy grail of oil. The vast majority of it is actually dino oil, but refined to a totally different level. The oil molecules are manipulated so they are almost all the same size. Think of marbles with a board on top. Different size marbles will only somewhat support the board, but if all the marbles are the same size the board has much more support- and less wear of the board as you move it. It flows better at cold temps due to all the molecules being almost the same size; they don’t fight each other as different sizes would. It has been refined to a much higher degree as far as the cleanliness of the oil. Synthetic is cleaner oil from the get go- and due to that it lowers wear. We are talking at the micron level. Imagine that when an engine is running the bearing journal clearance is one micron. (Very very small) If a ¾ micron particle enters the bearing, the oil is taller then the particle, so no wear. But if the particle is 1.5 micron, either the particle doesn’t get in or it scrapes a tiny piece of tin off the bearing. Do this repeatedly and you have problems. The majority of engine wear is from fine dust. If you work on an engine and a few larger pieces of dirt get in, it is usually caught by the filter. It is actually the smaller dust particles 3 to 5 microns that actually create most wear in an engine. The problem with larger pieces is as they scrape engine components, they make many smaller pieces, and those now create wear. 


2. Diesel fuel, or fuel dilution 


Put even a small amount of diesel fuel in the oil and the 1 micron gap becomes smaller, and the oil can’t support the weight of the crankshaft as well as it should. The fuel would have a smaller molecule size, thereby stressing the oil. Viscosity of the oil is loweredand all the oil gaps in the engine just got smaller- think different size marbles, so less support. And yes, the journal gap is actually about 1 micron when engine is running. 2% fuel dilution is a lot. It will lower the viscosity of your oil 


. 3. Viscosity and shear 


As far as viscosity, 5w30 is 5-weight oil. 15w40 is actually 15-weight oil. And no, the “w” does not mean weight, it actually means winter It means it has the additives to allow it to flow well in winter- or at least cold temperatures. What is the other number? It is how it will flow at a high temp. How? Additives, and a lot of it. Some oils are as much as 40% additives and 60 % oil. One additive is a polymer shaped like a worm. When it is cold, it curls into a small ball, like you and I. When warm, it stretches out. If I pour curled worms (cold) thru a funnel, they would pour pretty quickly as they are basically round. When hot and stretched out, they would have a harder time pouring thru a funnel thereby restricting flow. It works great until…. shear. When oil shears down those worms get all chopped up. They really don’t restrict the flow of oil anymore, and the oil is now in effect thinner, less viscosity at higher temps.. It can no longer reach the thickness of the higher number. Viscosity actually means “the resistance to flow” .A bad thing is when you overheat a engine. Everyone knows to fix a overheat problem right away, but many don’t change oil. If a piece of equipment overheats change the oil ASAP, as the polymers can be partly melted and may stick to everything in your engine. Ever see the black crud after overheating oil? It is actually a form of melted plastic wanting to clog up everything. Many other additives become depleted, or just don’t work as intended as before. And there are MANY different additives in oil protecting our equipment. 


4. Oil changes and filters Speaking of oil changes? 


Yes, very important. Don’t skimp on oil filters, as there are amazing differences between some them. Many aftermarket filters are great but if it is too cheap ask why. Better filters have silicone gaskets and something called anti-drain back valves inside made of silicone also, but cheap filters have rubber gaskets and thin paper gaskets inside. Some filters are bypass filters, which only filter a small amount of oil, but do a better job of it. Any filter is a compromise between flow and filtration rate. If you have a very small micron rating, it will clean very well but have low flow rates. Higher micron means larger pore size, but filters more oil. Some filters have both inside the same housing, and if your engine is designed to use that filter, I would really spend the extra money to use it. A micron rating of a filter is almost useless unless it is it’s a “absolute” micron rating. That means that almost nothing over that size will get thru. Just saying a filter has a micron rating means it will catch most of that size particle, but also will allow larger particles thru and is designed that way. Window screening can have a micron rating, as it will stop some small particles too, but I wouldn’t use it in my engine (exaggeration). Also, when oil is cold, it really won’t flow thru a filter, so it bypasses the filter altogether. You have very little filtration until the oil warms up and can pass thru the filter, so be gentle on your equipment until operating temperature.. One more consideration to think about is top up oil. Whatever oil you put in at your oil change, top up using the exact same oil until the next oil change if possible. Only switch brands or weights at oil change if possible. Most any reputable oil supplier will give you a superior product, whether dino or synthetic. The problem is each manufacturer uses a different additive package to achieve the same goal. SAE (society of automotive engineers) dictates they must all be compatible. But that is to their minimum standard for a given classification. When you mix additive packages, certain additive may actually bind up another, or render a certain anti wear property ineffective. Sometimes-even worse. I once actually dumped 30,000 gallons new (4 tanker trucks) oil into a waste oil tank as the oil caused many thousands of dollars of damage, and was very difficult to figure out what was going on. Try to explain THAT to your purchasing department! (it was not engine oil- it was for something else) It was the right oil but the oil from 2 different manufacturers mixed and created devastating results. It shouldn’t have, but did. Even different weight oil from the same manufacturer can have different additive packages and may not play nice together. Most major oil producers put in different trace elements into their oil so if you have a problem down the road they can tell right away thru oil analysis if it is actually their oil. And remember that it can be up to 40% additives! When to change oil? Every vehicle is different and driven differently. In some countries they change oil by operating hours, and other places they change oil by the amount of fuel consumed by the engine, which if you think about it makes the most sense out of everything. The more fuel consumed, the more work performed, less fuel less work. Diesel oil gets black almost immediately, and is not uncommon. Engines make soot and other byproducts of combustion, some of which end up in the oil. The oil has chemicals that are used as dispersants, which hold the tiny particles in suspension. Its job is to keep the particles separate and not let them touch each other so that even under pressure they don’t form a particle that would be larger then the oil film, which would then create wear. When the oil can’t hold any more particles, wear starts. The small particles are attracted to each other, and form larger particles. At that point it is larger then the thickness of the oil on the parts but still too small for the filter to catch. When the oil can’t hold any more particles, it falls out and becomes sludge. Want cheaters way to find out where your oil stands? Here is a rudimentary oil analysis test: Take a white business card or heavy card stock with no gloss coating. Pull the dipstick and put one drop of oil on back of card. Leave card flat 8 hours. Oil will soak in and make a stain. If the stain is even darkness all the way from center to outer edge of ring the oil is dispersing the contaminants, as it should. If stain is darker in the middle but gets lighter to outside the oil cant hold any more contaminants and should be changed. If the very center is very dark and has a sudden lightness to the outer ring (very dark to very light) you most likely have Diesel fuel in the oil. There are other test but get harder to perform. This is only a guide, different oils have different properties, but is accurate quite often. I have used this as a field test to determine if there are engine problems. If someone changes your oil and says it will be synthetic, watch them. If they pour your oil from sealed jugs, ok. If they use the hose, there may be a problem. No synthetic manufacturer delivers pure synthetic in bulk tanks as far as I know. They are proud of the product, and want the pure product going into your equipment. They supply quart, gallon, 5 gallon and 55-gallon drums as far as I have seen. I believe I heard some deliver in a 130 gallon tote, which could be pumped thru lines, but have not seen it. In bulk, they have no control over the tank in the repair shop, or the tanker hauling it. Was it clean to begin with or did it have a leftover product from something else? Who knows- tankers can be nasty animals- Yes I have caught contamination in tanks from bulk haulers. Most are good, but synthetic manufacturers will not risk their reputation on someone else. It would be almost impossible to clean a whole tanker to the ISO standards most synthetics claim to be at. 


5. Water and antifreeze 


Water or glycol will destroy bearings very quickly. Most oils will emulsify -or hold a small amount of water, and if in tiny amounts like condensation it won’t do much harm. Dino oils are actually better at it then synthetic. When the water can’t be emulsified into the oil, you get droplets. They may be microscopic, but still droplets. What happens to destroy a bearing is that the tiny drop of water enters a bearing journal along with the oil, then the piston and injector fires. The pressure on that bearing is incredible. It instantly turns the water to extreme high-pressure steam, literally blowing a tiny piece of tin from your bearing. Bearings do not like being pressure washed or steam cleaned, and at 2000 RPM it doesn’t take long to destroy bearings. It has higher pressure in the journal than your piston has compression in the cylinder, and that pressure was enough to ignite the diesel fuel on top of the piston! Be very careful when pressure washing your equipment or driving thru high water. If you want to wash your engine do it before a oil change. There is a old saying that a dirty diesel is a happy diesel, and I think I know why. Whenever you start or stop your equipment there will be a certain amount of condensation inside. Hopefully when you drive it will get hot enough for long enough to remove that moisture from the oil. If you don’t drive the engine hard enough- or long enough- you can “wet out the filter”, which simply means the paper of the filter gets wet. Once this happens, no matter how much oil pressure you develop, you simply can’t force the oil thru the filter, and the oil will go thru the bypass valve and not get filtered. If the bypass valve doesn’t open, you can blow the filter or something worse. Oil with no moisture is your friend. 


6. What can I do? 
Change your fluids as per recommendations. If you feel inclined, do it sooner, but not later. One full year on oil is a long time if you really think about it. Even though you may not max out on mileage (or even run very little mileage), you still have moisture, soot and other contaminants going into the oil. The problem is they create acids and other bad things, running or not. The iron from your block may not care, but your bearings and aluminum parts will not like you much. Here is some food for thought-if you run down the road at 1600 rpm, in one hour your crankshaft spun on its bearings 96,000 times. If you drove just 6 hours today, it spun 576,000 times. In 1,000 hours it will have spun 96,000,000 times, 10,000 hour it sun 960,000,000 times, close to a billion times. A little acid can do a lot of damage.. And another thing that makes me cringe- when I see someone shut off the engine without a cool down for the turbo. The turbo can spin at 80,000 rpm and more. It will spin for a while after you shut the engine down- and after shut down it has no new oil circulating thru it- bad idea. The turbo deals with extreme hot gasses from the exhaust, and creates pressure on the other side of the turbo, both of which make lots of heat. Let the engine run just a couple of minutes to let the oil cool the bearings and your turbo will like a longer happier life. Also you won’t have burnt oil in the oil passages clogging up the oil delivery,. Even the best oil cannot lubricate and cool if it is not being pumped thru the bearing. But anything more than five minutes can create its own problems, as the engine does not create enough oil pressure to keep everything like the turbo properly lubricated and cooled. Also, the engine itself really does not build enough heat at idle, which means the fuel injected into the engine does not completely burn, and will wash the oil off the cylinder walls. The fuel can also end up in the engine oil, which can create other problems. If for some reason you must run the engine for a longer time then 5 minutes, run the engine at fast idle. This will help somewhat, as the engine will build more heat, but shutting it off will save fuel, wear and tear. 


7. Fuel and oil additives 
Are additives a good idea? I do believe that some of the diesel fuel today needs a little help for certain engines. Cummins in particular demands a high lubricity fuel for the injectors and pump. I can honestly say my engine runs smoother when I add schaeffers fuel additive to it. Most fuel should be fine, but injectors and fuel pumps are expensive. When I had fuel tested years ago, yes we had batches that did not meet Cummins specs as far as lubricity even from some of the top fuel producers. I believe they are now better, but I don’t know for sure where the fuel came from. Try not to store diesel too long- even the big oil companies labs themselves admitted to me the new diesel fuels are not as chemically stable as they once were, and nothing you can add will help that. And at the same time our engines have become much more finicky as to what we put in them. But also remember that storing with low or almost empty tanks will invite condensation into your fuel tank. They refine diesel differently now to extract more fuel out of a barrel of oil, but it wants to chemically revert back to what it was before (crude oil). Water in fuel is horrible on soo many levels, and invite bugs to grow (black + green slime). These microbes actually live in the water in your tank, and eat the fuel, and live right at what they call the fuel-water interface. They clog filters, injectors, lines and anything else. They are a nightmare to clean once you have them- only buy quality fuel from someplace that moves a lot of it. They have treatments for microbes, and if your unit sits a lot you should think about using it. Bottom line is drive your motor home and burn that fuel! And as far as bio, I can tell you that even though we did everything we could to be earth friendly (hybrids, recycling everything, etc) the major engine manufacturers really, really wanted us to stay away from bio because of many problems down the road. I know I have it in my fuel tank right now, but I avoid it if I can. 


Additives for oil are another matter entirely. The choice is a personal one, but I have firsthand experience and thousands of actual oil analysis tests, and also several tests trying numerous different additives. Bottom line? No way would I personally ever change the chemical makeup of these newer oils after seeing the results. But up to you, just be aware if the claim is too good. How can a product work well when there are literally hundreds of different oil additive packages, and then do so well with every one? Even if it did help one property of oil, will it hurt another? Oil has many jobs, not just one. 


What oils do I personally run? I am scared to say this, but I run synthetic in every thing except the engine. Brands are a personal preference, but realize all major players make a good product. Most additive packages are not made by the big oil producers, and are farmed out to specialty companies that do only that. I am NOT trying to sway anyone’s opinion on what to use anywhere. Transmissions are high load animals, and have high heat loads also. They have less chance of outside contamination, and should run a long time on quality oil. Steering, slide motors, hydraulic fans, leveling systems, differentials, and pretty much anything else have a smaller chance of outside contamination and should be fine with any quality oil. But that huge air pump we call an engine (gas or diesel) is subject to many different outside sources, and consumes many dirty, nasty things, and creates them also. I would run synthetic in the engine if I had a lab in my garage to test the oil at least yearly, and actually use synthetic to its capacity. But since I don’t, I would rather change the oil in my Cummins once a year. Would synthetic be better? Most likely, but I really am fine with 500k out of my engine. I believe the bus will disintegrate and fall apart around the running engine at that mileage. Everyone has their own game plan and that is up to them. I did not try to start controversy, only to clear things up for a few people on what oil does and how. Am I obsessed with oil? Yes, probably. There is so much more but I need shut up now. 


I do have a lot of confidence in these machines though. In transit vehicles, it is not uncommon to run for 300,000 up to 800,000 miles or more before teardown on just dino oil. You must understand that for 14 hours, they went 2 blocks full throttle, and then slam on the brakes. 2 blocks full throttle…… When analyzed I can tell you at least 75% were destroyed by outside influences, and not just worn out even with the mileage they accumulated and how they were driven. Considering how most of the people in this group baby their machines, I want to shake the hand of somebody who actually wears out a diesel engine in a motor home. Heck, I want to buy them a beer also.. Parts fail with catastrophic results, and contaminants routinely get in and do serious damage, but,.Actually wear out?? Hard to do. Norm 


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4c

Re: Oil*

Sun Jun 26, 2016 9:35 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

avfordguy

As a retired field service engineer for Ford, i am fully aware that this artical is spot on, manufacturers go through a very long process to determine what oil works best. Always adhere to the manufactures recomendations

GordieKaltz
04 dip 330 ISC

 


Preventing DUVAC alternator problems
Perry Paul

Van,

Great post! I am fairly new to all of this but I have had to figure a few things out so I'm not completely green. I am one who had the change the Duvac alt a few years ago! I also changed the large Isolator a year ago and I am faced with changing it again even tho I went with one rated at slightly higher amps than what I had. I'm not sure why there are two but the small one still works.

Needless too say, I want to save the alternator and I don't want to keep replacing the SSI so your post is exactly what I needed to see, especially because its a more efficient charge for the batteries from what I'm reading. That said, I am not familiar with the BIRD, IRD, Big boy, or the Lambert charger or where they are or if I even have them. Does your picture show any of those components or would I be removing them at this time? I have a Magnum inverter/charger which is all I know for sure.  

To do what you did in the pictures you provided, is seems simple enough to follow your wiring or should I study mine further to understand what all I have? I also see the ML-ACR has control wires...  are they defined in the installation instructions?

 Van, did you also replace the BIRD and IRD with the ML-ACR?

I apologize for all the questions. I am just afraid to get far into this and not come out the other end with it not working. I am an experienced mechanic so I think I know when to jump in and when not to but I would really appreciate anything you can help with!

Thanks again for posting!

Perry

P.S. I can download pictures of what I have if necessary although it is very similar to what you have since mine is just a year older Monaco.

 


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Dr4Film

I knew I had saved a PDF file that gave comparisons of various diesel oils based on their quality and performance.

I can't seem to find a date but it may still be relevant.

On edit - go to https://www.turbodieselregister.com/ and look up various TDR's as to what they have to offer for information.

 

Diesel Engine Oil Comparison.pdf


Location of the Dash Annunciator
Yoaks5

Here is the latest update. I took Bills suggestion and called Lisa at Actia and she put me in touch with one of their engineers. He suggested I start by replacing the warning bank (the little square box in my pictures above where the 2 air lines plug in to) since one of the connections had been re-soldered at some point. They still have these available so I ordered one of them and installed it. That did fix my tach/air gauge issue so they are not bouncing back and forth any more. It did not solve my no chime/ alarm issue. He did say I could send in my speedometer and they could most likely be able to repair it. That's where the speaker is located. So I plan to do that this winter.

In the mean time I need to look into some kind of temporary alarm for the low air. Not sure if there is some kind of alarm I could cut one of the air lines and install with a T? Something that would give me notice that I'm loosing air pressure.

He also sent me the attached manual of the gauges. Would have saved me a lot of work and time if I would have had this earlier. Hopefully it will help someone else.

Actia Gauges 105820RevD Monaco Navigator TIPS and manual.pdf


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Ivan K

Thanks Richard. I forgot where I have seen it before but glad to see that that guy agrees with my choice, haha. Others may disagree and that's ok.


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
Paul A.
3 hours ago, sunriseranch2000 said:

Fellow Campers,

Here is some info I collected from the group years ago.

   


Re: Oil*

 

Sun Jun 26, 2016 6:54 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

 

richoliveria

 

I WENT BACK AND CLEANED THIS UP TO MAKE IT MORE READABLE. 


Rich O. 


Sorry this is so long, but… 

My name is Norm, and worked at one of the largest transit agencies in the U.S. The last five years I worked on oil analysis and how to extend drive train life on trucks, buses and train cars. I was heavily involved in failure analysis of equipment, and ways of cutting operating costs. Over those years I worked with the labs of two major oil and fuel producers. Utilizing 4 private labs we tested over 12,000 engine, transmission, hydraulic system, differential and more oil samples, and saved countless dollars. I am not that smart, but met many people over those years who are that smart, and had a bad habit of asking way too many questions. I am just hoping to help prolong the life of our equipment. 

1. What is synthetic oil? Why is it better? 


Is it better? Lubricants are a slippery mystery to many people. If I can I will try to clear up a few things. Many think synthetic is the holy grail of oil. The vast majority of it is actually dino oil, but refined to a totally different level. The oil molecules are manipulated so they are almost all the same size. Think of marbles with a board on top. Different size marbles will only somewhat support the board, but if all the marbles are the same size the board has much more support- and less wear of the board as you move it. It flows better at cold temps due to all the molecules being almost the same size; they don’t fight each other as different sizes would. It has been refined to a much higher degree as far as the cleanliness of the oil. Synthetic is cleaner oil from the get go- and due to that it lowers wear. We are talking at the micron level. Imagine that when an engine is running the bearing journal clearance is one micron. (Very very small) If a ¾ micron particle enters the bearing, the oil is taller then the particle, so no wear. But if the particle is 1.5 micron, either the particle doesn’t get in or it scrapes a tiny piece of tin off the bearing. Do this repeatedly and you have problems. The majority of engine wear is from fine dust. If you work on an engine and a few larger pieces of dirt get in, it is usually caught by the filter. It is actually the smaller dust particles 3 to 5 microns that actually create most wear in an engine. The problem with larger pieces is as they scrape engine components, they make many smaller pieces, and those now create wear. 


2. Diesel fuel, or fuel dilution 


Put even a small amount of diesel fuel in the oil and the 1 micron gap becomes smaller, and the oil can’t support the weight of the crankshaft as well as it should. The fuel would have a smaller molecule size, thereby stressing the oil. Viscosity of the oil is loweredand all the oil gaps in the engine just got smaller- think different size marbles, so less support. And yes, the journal gap is actually about 1 micron when engine is running. 2% fuel dilution is a lot. It will lower the viscosity of your oil 


. 3. Viscosity and shear 


As far as viscosity, 5w30 is 5-weight oil. 15w40 is actually 15-weight oil. And no, the “w” does not mean weight, it actually means winter It means it has the additives to allow it to flow well in winter- or at least cold temperatures. What is the other number? It is how it will flow at a high temp. How? Additives, and a lot of it. Some oils are as much as 40% additives and 60 % oil. One additive is a polymer shaped like a worm. When it is cold, it curls into a small ball, like you and I. When warm, it stretches out. If I pour curled worms (cold) thru a funnel, they would pour pretty quickly as they are basically round. When hot and stretched out, they would have a harder time pouring thru a funnel thereby restricting flow. It works great until…. shear. When oil shears down those worms get all chopped up. They really don’t restrict the flow of oil anymore, and the oil is now in effect thinner, less viscosity at higher temps.. It can no longer reach the thickness of the higher number. Viscosity actually means “the resistance to flow” .A bad thing is when you overheat a engine. Everyone knows to fix a overheat problem right away, but many don’t change oil. If a piece of equipment overheats change the oil ASAP, as the polymers can be partly melted and may stick to everything in your engine. Ever see the black crud after overheating oil? It is actually a form of melted plastic wanting to clog up everything. Many other additives become depleted, or just don’t work as intended as before. And there are MANY different additives in oil protecting our equipment. 


4. Oil changes and filters Speaking of oil changes? 


Yes, very important. Don’t skimp on oil filters, as there are amazing differences between some them. Many aftermarket filters are great but if it is too cheap ask why. Better filters have silicone gaskets and something called anti-drain back valves inside made of silicone also, but cheap filters have rubber gaskets and thin paper gaskets inside. Some filters are bypass filters, which only filter a small amount of oil, but do a better job of it. Any filter is a compromise between flow and filtration rate. If you have a very small micron rating, it will clean very well but have low flow rates. Higher micron means larger pore size, but filters more oil. Some filters have both inside the same housing, and if your engine is designed to use that filter, I would really spend the extra money to use it. A micron rating of a filter is almost useless unless it is it’s a “absolute” micron rating. That means that almost nothing over that size will get thru. Just saying a filter has a micron rating means it will catch most of that size particle, but also will allow larger particles thru and is designed that way. Window screening can have a micron rating, as it will stop some small particles too, but I wouldn’t use it in my engine (exaggeration). Also, when oil is cold, it really won’t flow thru a filter, so it bypasses the filter altogether. You have very little filtration until the oil warms up and can pass thru the filter, so be gentle on your equipment until operating temperature.. One more consideration to think about is top up oil. Whatever oil you put in at your oil change, top up using the exact same oil until the next oil change if possible. Only switch brands or weights at oil change if possible. Most any reputable oil supplier will give you a superior product, whether dino or synthetic. The problem is each manufacturer uses a different additive package to achieve the same goal. SAE (society of automotive engineers) dictates they must all be compatible. But that is to their minimum standard for a given classification. When you mix additive packages, certain additive may actually bind up another, or render a certain anti wear property ineffective. Sometimes-even worse. I once actually dumped 30,000 gallons new (4 tanker trucks) oil into a waste oil tank as the oil caused many thousands of dollars of damage, and was very difficult to figure out what was going on. Try to explain THAT to your purchasing department! (it was not engine oil- it was for something else) It was the right oil but the oil from 2 different manufacturers mixed and created devastating results. It shouldn’t have, but did. Even different weight oil from the same manufacturer can have different additive packages and may not play nice together. Most major oil producers put in different trace elements into their oil so if you have a problem down the road they can tell right away thru oil analysis if it is actually their oil. And remember that it can be up to 40% additives! When to change oil? Every vehicle is different and driven differently. In some countries they change oil by operating hours, and other places they change oil by the amount of fuel consumed by the engine, which if you think about it makes the most sense out of everything. The more fuel consumed, the more work performed, less fuel less work. Diesel oil gets black almost immediately, and is not uncommon. Engines make soot and other byproducts of combustion, some of which end up in the oil. The oil has chemicals that are used as dispersants, which hold the tiny particles in suspension. Its job is to keep the particles separate and not let them touch each other so that even under pressure they don’t form a particle that would be larger then the oil film, which would then create wear. When the oil can’t hold any more particles, wear starts. The small particles are attracted to each other, and form larger particles. At that point it is larger then the thickness of the oil on the parts but still too small for the filter to catch. When the oil can’t hold any more particles, it falls out and becomes sludge. Want cheaters way to find out where your oil stands? Here is a rudimentary oil analysis test: Take a white business card or heavy card stock with no gloss coating. Pull the dipstick and put one drop of oil on back of card. Leave card flat 8 hours. Oil will soak in and make a stain. If the stain is even darkness all the way from center to outer edge of ring the oil is dispersing the contaminants, as it should. If stain is darker in the middle but gets lighter to outside the oil cant hold any more contaminants and should be changed. If the very center is very dark and has a sudden lightness to the outer ring (very dark to very light) you most likely have Diesel fuel in the oil. There are other test but get harder to perform. This is only a guide, different oils have different properties, but is accurate quite often. I have used this as a field test to determine if there are engine problems. If someone changes your oil and says it will be synthetic, watch them. If they pour your oil from sealed jugs, ok. If they use the hose, there may be a problem. No synthetic manufacturer delivers pure synthetic in bulk tanks as far as I know. They are proud of the product, and want the pure product going into your equipment. They supply quart, gallon, 5 gallon and 55-gallon drums as far as I have seen. I believe I heard some deliver in a 130 gallon tote, which could be pumped thru lines, but have not seen it. In bulk, they have no control over the tank in the repair shop, or the tanker hauling it. Was it clean to begin with or did it have a leftover product from something else? Who knows- tankers can be nasty animals- Yes I have caught contamination in tanks from bulk haulers. Most are good, but synthetic manufacturers will not risk their reputation on someone else. It would be almost impossible to clean a whole tanker to the ISO standards most synthetics claim to be at. 


5. Water and antifreeze 


Water or glycol will destroy bearings very quickly. Most oils will emulsify -or hold a small amount of water, and if in tiny amounts like condensation it won’t do much harm. Dino oils are actually better at it then synthetic. When the water can’t be emulsified into the oil, you get droplets. They may be microscopic, but still droplets. What happens to destroy a bearing is that the tiny drop of water enters a bearing journal along with the oil, then the piston and injector fires. The pressure on that bearing is incredible. It instantly turns the water to extreme high-pressure steam, literally blowing a tiny piece of tin from your bearing. Bearings do not like being pressure washed or steam cleaned, and at 2000 RPM it doesn’t take long to destroy bearings. It has higher pressure in the journal than your piston has compression in the cylinder, and that pressure was enough to ignite the diesel fuel on top of the piston! Be very careful when pressure washing your equipment or driving thru high water. If you want to wash your engine do it before a oil change. There is a old saying that a dirty diesel is a happy diesel, and I think I know why. Whenever you start or stop your equipment there will be a certain amount of condensation inside. Hopefully when you drive it will get hot enough for long enough to remove that moisture from the oil. If you don’t drive the engine hard enough- or long enough- you can “wet out the filter”, which simply means the paper of the filter gets wet. Once this happens, no matter how much oil pressure you develop, you simply can’t force the oil thru the filter, and the oil will go thru the bypass valve and not get filtered. If the bypass valve doesn’t open, you can blow the filter or something worse. Oil with no moisture is your friend. 


6. What can I do? 
Change your fluids as per recommendations. If you feel inclined, do it sooner, but not later. One full year on oil is a long time if you really think about it. Even though you may not max out on mileage (or even run very little mileage), you still have moisture, soot and other contaminants going into the oil. The problem is they create acids and other bad things, running or not. The iron from your block may not care, but your bearings and aluminum parts will not like you much. Here is some food for thought-if you run down the road at 1600 rpm, in one hour your crankshaft spun on its bearings 96,000 times. If you drove just 6 hours today, it spun 576,000 times. In 1,000 hours it will have spun 96,000,000 times, 10,000 hour it sun 960,000,000 times, close to a billion times. A little acid can do a lot of damage.. And another thing that makes me cringe- when I see someone shut off the engine without a cool down for the turbo. The turbo can spin at 80,000 rpm and more. It will spin for a while after you shut the engine down- and after shut down it has no new oil circulating thru it- bad idea. The turbo deals with extreme hot gasses from the exhaust, and creates pressure on the other side of the turbo, both of which make lots of heat. Let the engine run just a couple of minutes to let the oil cool the bearings and your turbo will like a longer happier life. Also you won’t have burnt oil in the oil passages clogging up the oil delivery,. Even the best oil cannot lubricate and cool if it is not being pumped thru the bearing. But anything more than five minutes can create its own problems, as the engine does not create enough oil pressure to keep everything like the turbo properly lubricated and cooled. Also, the engine itself really does not build enough heat at idle, which means the fuel injected into the engine does not completely burn, and will wash the oil off the cylinder walls. The fuel can also end up in the engine oil, which can create other problems. If for some reason you must run the engine for a longer time then 5 minutes, run the engine at fast idle. This will help somewhat, as the engine will build more heat, but shutting it off will save fuel, wear and tear. 


7. Fuel and oil additives 
Are additives a good idea? I do believe that some of the diesel fuel today needs a little help for certain engines. Cummins in particular demands a high lubricity fuel for the injectors and pump. I can honestly say my engine runs smoother when I add schaeffers fuel additive to it. Most fuel should be fine, but injectors and fuel pumps are expensive. When I had fuel tested years ago, yes we had batches that did not meet Cummins specs as far as lubricity even from some of the top fuel producers. I believe they are now better, but I don’t know for sure where the fuel came from. Try not to store diesel too long- even the big oil companies labs themselves admitted to me the new diesel fuels are not as chemically stable as they once were, and nothing you can add will help that. And at the same time our engines have become much more finicky as to what we put in them. But also remember that storing with low or almost empty tanks will invite condensation into your fuel tank. They refine diesel differently now to extract more fuel out of a barrel of oil, but it wants to chemically revert back to what it was before (crude oil). Water in fuel is horrible on soo many levels, and invite bugs to grow (black + green slime). These microbes actually live in the water in your tank, and eat the fuel, and live right at what they call the fuel-water interface. They clog filters, injectors, lines and anything else. They are a nightmare to clean once you have them- only buy quality fuel from someplace that moves a lot of it. They have treatments for microbes, and if your unit sits a lot you should think about using it. Bottom line is drive your motor home and burn that fuel! And as far as bio, I can tell you that even though we did everything we could to be earth friendly (hybrids, recycling everything, etc) the major engine manufacturers really, really wanted us to stay away from bio because of many problems down the road. I know I have it in my fuel tank right now, but I avoid it if I can. 


Additives for oil are another matter entirely. The choice is a personal one, but I have firsthand experience and thousands of actual oil analysis tests, and also several tests trying numerous different additives. Bottom line? No way would I personally ever change the chemical makeup of these newer oils after seeing the results. But up to you, just be aware if the claim is too good. How can a product work well when there are literally hundreds of different oil additive packages, and then do so well with every one? Even if it did help one property of oil, will it hurt another? Oil has many jobs, not just one. 


What oils do I personally run? I am scared to say this, but I run synthetic in every thing except the engine. Brands are a personal preference, but realize all major players make a good product. Most additive packages are not made by the big oil producers, and are farmed out to specialty companies that do only that. I am NOT trying to sway anyone’s opinion on what to use anywhere. Transmissions are high load animals, and have high heat loads also. They have less chance of outside contamination, and should run a long time on quality oil. Steering, slide motors, hydraulic fans, leveling systems, differentials, and pretty much anything else have a smaller chance of outside contamination and should be fine with any quality oil. But that huge air pump we call an engine (gas or diesel) is subject to many different outside sources, and consumes many dirty, nasty things, and creates them also. I would run synthetic in the engine if I had a lab in my garage to test the oil at least yearly, and actually use synthetic to its capacity. But since I don’t, I would rather change the oil in my Cummins once a year. Would synthetic be better? Most likely, but I really am fine with 500k out of my engine. I believe the bus will disintegrate and fall apart around the running engine at that mileage. Everyone has their own game plan and that is up to them. I did not try to start controversy, only to clear things up for a few people on what oil does and how. Am I obsessed with oil? Yes, probably. There is so much more but I need shut up now. 


I do have a lot of confidence in these machines though. In transit vehicles, it is not uncommon to run for 300,000 up to 800,000 miles or more before teardown on just dino oil. You must understand that for 14 hours, they went 2 blocks full throttle, and then slam on the brakes. 2 blocks full throttle…… When analyzed I can tell you at least 75% were destroyed by outside influences, and not just worn out even with the mileage they accumulated and how they were driven. Considering how most of the people in this group baby their machines, I want to shake the hand of somebody who actually wears out a diesel engine in a motor home. Heck, I want to buy them a beer also.. Parts fail with catastrophic results, and contaminants routinely get in and do serious damage, but,.Actually wear out?? Hard to do. Norm 


 

 

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4c

 

Re: Oil*

 

Sun Jun 26, 2016 9:35 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

 

avfordguy

 

As a retired field service engineer for Ford, i am fully aware that this artical is spot on, manufacturers go through a very long process to determine what oil works best. Always adhere to the manufactures recomendations

GordieKaltz
04 dip 330 ISC

 

 

Thanks for the post. Gordy was a great guy and a regular contributor on this site.


Leaking flexible sink drain
Paul A.

Lots of folks doing that repair have purchased Hot Tub plumbing components from H D and Lowes. 


Slide won't move in or out.
Steve P
On 9/19/2021 at 11:29 PM, BobSchmeck said:

Thanks ,we found what yiu were talking about and got the slid in. It is a lippert. 

Thanks 

@BobSchmeck, I salute you for helping those folks, whoever they are.  I know they appreciate you.  Being stranded is no fun.  


2002 Dip, first MH to cut our teeth on
Rikadoo

I got to say the “truck” part of the 6.4 was AWSOME, if i lived somewhere other than Ca i would throw that 6.4 in a melting pot!!! Then i would install a 6.7 cummins in it an drive it till the wheels rolled off it!


Dash A/C vs MPG … Fact or Fiction?
Rikadoo

I remember years ago in the mid to late 70’s when people discovered car mfgs designed the AC compressor to run in EVERY position except vent an floor… there comments then were the same now, that they felt it was a waste of fuel mileage, of course back then many engines were under powered (chevy Vega, ford pinto) so some of there complaints were valid. Then you also had the daily drivers that drove there cars like they were in NASCAR…

Now today they have become commonplace, that out here in Ca for the most part you have alot more road noise from bigger traffic patterns, along with homeless at stoplights, or the more than occasional traffic jam in high heats. To those folk i say “you go on ahead, turn that gas guzzling ac off” roll down that window an let the wind blow thru your hair! 
Good god nurse! I learned along time ago there are folks that will step over a dollor to pick up a dime!!! My rig weighs over 35k Lbs, the fuel i use to break the rolling resistance could run a Prius a long way… Honestly im not trashing peoples choises, yes the system takes energy to run it. Full stop! End of story! Can the amount of fuel required to run the ac, maybe, but who cares!!! I remember in the late 70’s when the DOT mandated all over the road trucks (18 wheelers) will no longer be available with out AC. Stating ac reduces stress, hang out sometime in a truck stop an see if you can find any of them that are NOT running there ac! I can go on an on however i really feel this point is Moot!

1 minute ago, Rikadoo said:

I remember years ago in the mid to late 70’s when people discovered car mfgs designed the AC compressor to run in EVERY position except vent an floor… there comments then were the same now, that they felt it was a waste of fuel mileage, of course back then many engines were under powered (chevy Vega, ford pinto) so some of there complaints were valid. Then you also had the daily drivers that drove there cars like they were in NASCAR…

Now today they have become commonplace, that out here in Ca for the most part you have alot more road noise from bigger traffic patterns, along with homeless at stoplights, or the more than occasional traffic jam in high heats. To those folk i say “you go on ahead, turn that gas guzzling ac off” roll down that window an let the wind blow thru your hair! 
Good god nurse! I learned along time ago there are folks that will step over a dollor to pick up a dime!!! My rig weighs over 35k Lbs, the fuel i use to break the rolling resistance could run a Prius a long way… Honestly im not trashing peoples choises, yes the system takes energy to run it. Full stop! End of story! Can the amount of fuel required to run the ac be measured maybe? but who cares!!! I remember in the late 70’s when the DOT mandated all over the road trucks (18 wheelers) will no longer be available with out AC. Stating ac reduces stress, hang out sometime in a truck stop an see if you can find any of them that are NOT running there ac! I can go on an on however i really feel this point is Moot!

 


Let's Talk Oil . . . .
cbr046
5 hours ago, Dr4Film said:

I knew I had saved a PDF file that gave comparisons of various diesel oils based on their quality and performance.

I can't seem to find a date but it may still be relevant.

On edit - go to https://www.turbodieselregister.com/ and look up various TDR's as to what they have to offer for information.

 

Diesel Engine Oil Comparison.pdf 166.64 kB · 11 downloads

Just when I thought I had my mind made up . . .

Good articles!

- bob


2004 ISC 8.3 Pacbrake Mechanical and electrical/air testing method
Rikadoo

Manually override the backup camera to stay on, step on the brakes and see if you can see the glow, then take a small drive at night, click on the pac brake and look to see if you can see the brake light glow.  


Extensive facelift, paint, and new electronics for a 2000 Monaco Diplomat
Scotty Hutto

Rick,

For my front camera, I plan to mount exactly as John did. By removing my TV, I can access the back of the front cap. I have replaced marker lights and broken a wire in the process, plus fished speaker cables through the front cap, so I know the drill there. The camera cable will come to the driver side A pillar and down under the dash.

My “brain” will be mounted in the dash where I already have a factory access panel.  I currently have a video multiplexer there, so already have power, grounds, etc to that point. 

My 10” monitor is already dash mounted with a Ram mount bar that also holds my TPMS and Garmin 780  

95336188-A162-44B7-9620-F8EA0A266378.thumb.jpeg.d2c4adef78ccfd102871c4cab8526b5f.jpeg
 

The rear camera will be mounted as John’s, except I don’t have the vent on top, so I’ll use a cable plate as in his pictures. 

That brings me to the side cameras…. I want to mount them mid-ship, but can’t quite picture how that would work on a slide. While the ability to see clearly when the slides are open is a great security feature, my primary focus is blind spot elimination when driving. My mid-point is about 12” behind my curbside slide, and about 24” behind my roadside slide. My only issue is an “elegant” way to get the cables to the roof. If I mount them just below the beltline, I think that will be optimum for the viewing angle, but right now I don’t see a way to do that on the curbside without an exposed cable. On the roadside I can punch through to the refrigerator vent, up, and out, just as John did. I have a residential reefer, so heat isn’t an issue there. 

Cables will come across the roof, and down through the drivers side A pillar. I have an existing hole and plate there where the previous owner ran satellite cables. If I can come up with an “elegant” way to get the camera cable to the roof on the curbside,I’ll be ready to go.  Right now my best idea is use eternabond tape to secure the cable/sleeve where it goes over the roof radius, but the thought of that white stripe doesn’t sit well. 

Any ideas or suggestions appreciated…
 

 


Re-clocking steering wheel
Gary Cole

Interesting post. I'm thinking that whether or not your steering wheel is centered when driving down the road is a good indicator of the general health of your suspension and alignment state. Mine is still perfectly centered at 41000 miles so maybe I'll worry about something else taking a dump for a while. 🙂


New Downloads Available

Actia Gauges Manual and Tips Navigator 2006
Actia Gauges Manual and Tips Navigator 2006
Owners manual and tips for the instrument gauges in 2006 Holiday Rambler Navigator. May also be for other years.
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