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Sewer pipe


Rick A
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I had my current hose for 4.5 years of travelling but we have a permanent 7 month site on my daughters property. We are full time, 9 years now. No big issues, these pipes are cheap, I prefer a new pipe every 4 years over a pipe that last 6 years and cost more. 


On my daughters property (4 acres)  I have the pipe running through a board system I created. It’s two cedar fence slats, screwed at 90 degrees. I put this down with the joint down, and the open side facing skyward do the pipe runs in the crease(?). I then put a second similar config on the top. They enclose the pipe protecting it from “All that Comes”. It very neat at I also run my water pipe in the same unit. It can take freezing weather.
You can just add extra pieces to lengthen the system. It’s great because you can manage the grade and keep the flow uniform which avoid uneven build up in the hose. 
Now wondering if I could just make a 3” PVC connection. Any thoughts? 
Travelling is just the usual out, down, up, in program. 

Edited by Rick A
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I have been using a combination of a PVC pipe and a very short “stinky slinky” for almost eight years.  I did  so partially because I always disliked trying to get the interior of a corrugated hose clean enough that it did not stink in storage.

But my main reason for the PVC setup was that I’ve encountered innumerable campgrounds where there is minimal fall from the RV to the dump fitting.  Trying to get a stinky slinky to drain adequately with only an inch or so of fall leaves lots of “solids” in the corrugated hose.  I’ve had to “milk” it repeatedly to get it even minimally clean.

With a long piece of smooth-bore PVC pipe it is easy to clean even when there is minimal fall.  And once removed, you can see through it and wash it until it is fully clean using minimal water.

Luckily, my old 2000 Dynasty was one of the last coaches with a full-width propane tank, and an access hatch at each end.  Once I moved the tank from the center of the bay forward to near the front bulkhead, I had copious room for a selection of 3” PVC pipes of different lengths, as well as storage for dump fittings and my collapsible ladder.  I carry 94”, 63” 48”, 36” and 24” long pieces.  These are the double-wall PVC pipes common in home warehouse stores, NOT the thin, single-wall tubes.  They have approximately a 3” ID and 3.5” OD.  Even if you have only a half-width propane tank (and less storage capacity), you can couple as many short pieces as necessary to meet your needs.

On the double-dump fitting of the coach itself, I use a clear Camco 45* coupler.  Glue a short piece of 3” double-wall PVC pipe using E-6000 glue to the Camco fitting (the PVC slips right over the Camco fitting).  When your combination dump valve (black & gray) is in good condition, you can easily rotate it to any angle you desire. I rotate the dump valve assembly until it points to the center of the dump port in the wet bay.  Using the Camco fitting with the glued-on piece of PVC, I slip onto the Gates # 21892 radiator hose with thumb-screw hose clamps.  I spray the insides of all the elastomeric couplings and the Gates hose with silicone lube every four or five trips, and the PVC slides easily into the Gates radiator hose.  I can slide the Gates hose as high as necessary depending on how much fall there is to the dump fitting at the campground.

When more than one section of PVC pipe is required, I use silicone rubber turbo “single hump” connectors to join the sections of PVC pipe.  The connectors are quite flexible and make getting the right path to the campground dump fitting quite easy.  I replaced the Nylok nuts on each connector with “handwheel-type” no-tool fasteners.

I support the PVC with homemade supports made from galvanized ground rod and a shop-made support that attaches to the galvanized ground rod.  This support might be a challenge for someone without machine shop skills, but I’m sure there are alternatives.  Using those supports, and the rigidity of the PVC pipe, I have been able to accommodate even the most ridiculously high CG dump ports.

At the connection to the CG dump pipe, I use a short (24”) stinky slinky to make the final connection.

Although the entire system might seem excessive to some, I have LOVED it from the very first trip.  I have not replaced a stinky slinky since the first day.

AmazonSmile: LTI Universal (89mm) 3.5" ID Straight Hump Coupler Silicone Hose 4-Ply Reinforced 102mm Length With T Bolt Clamp 304 Stainless Steel (3.5" Blue) : Automotive

This connects your various lengths of PVC pipe together when you need more than one piece of PVC.

AmazonSmile: Camco Clear 45 Degree Sewer Hose Adapter Fitting - See Through Adapter Allows You to See When Your RV Sewer Hose is Clean |Break Resistant and Easy to Install - (39432) : Automotive

This connects your dump fitting to the I.D. of the Gates hose.

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Oops!  Forgot to attach pix.  I don't have any pix of the system installed at a campground.  You can see it at the Gathering.

Last pix is of a "stretcher" I made when installed a new dump valve assembly.  If removing your dump valve does not cause the gray and black pipes to spring apart, it can be very difficult to get the new valve installed without disturbing the face seals.  This simple homemade device will spread them apart enough for you to insert the valve without disturbing the seals, insert the bolts to keep everything aligned, then relax the clamp to let it come together again.20191129_165029_resized.thumb.jpg.7b66ae4d1e5fed53d01e38710abb3650.jpg

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That is one of my pipe supports.  Made from a 5/8 galvanized ground rod, a huge framing spike, a piece of aluminum, and a purchased knob with threaded end.  There are probably other ways to do that without machining, and the rigid PVC doesn't need many supports.

Although the pix don't show it, the large radiator hose can be slid up far enough onto the dump valve connection that the hose exits in contact with the bottom of the coach, allowing maximum fall to the CG sewer connection.

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We used a Maserator 10 years full timing. Changed the impeller once a year. Never a failure. Lonnie used to conduct seminars at the FMCA Rally's and at pre Monaco Intl. Rally's.  

Selecting a choice from the many options available usually entails the actual use, then selecting the one you are satisfied with. 

Edited by Paul A.
grammer
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On 12/27/2021 at 12:54 PM, Ray Davis said:

 

We have used the same Camco as Richard for quite a few yrs, never had a problem.   Now, granted we are not full times, but before when they all seemed to be flimsy, cheap things they didn't last very long without springing leaks.

What is mostly going bad with yours?

Just look for peer review. 

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My coach has a sewer hose storage compartment next to the wet bay.  Small 6X6" hatch door with a 4" pvc tube mounted across the chassis, it holds the accordion type hose and is pretty convenient.  I just pull the hose out, slip one end up onto the drain and then the other onto the sewer connector. 

I also have a ~6' piece of plastic type gutter slide up into the 4" PVC pipe.  If I am close the the sewer pipe I can use a bungee cord to support one end of the gutter right next to the wet bay and lay the sewer hose right in it.  If needed I can block up the other end to control the slope.  This actually works pretty well.  It doesn't solve all the problems but helps. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I use the same sewer hose as Richard and I'm having a real problem of connecting and disconnecting the bayonet fittings.

This has become more of a problem as I age and I'm at the point where I can't get the fittings apart using my arm strength.

I have lubed them to no avail.

I'm thinking of buying some strap wrenches but would love to here of other "fixes".

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19 minutes ago, Chuck D said:

I use the same sewer hose as Richard and I'm having a real problem of connecting and disconnecting the bayonet fittings.

This has become more of a problem as I age and I'm at the point where I can't get the fittings apart using my arm strength.

I have lubed them to no avail.

I'm thinking of buying some strap wrenches but would love to here of other "fixes".

I saw a post somewhere and the solution was “oil filter” pliers. I have one but you need two, one for each side. I experimented with just the one and it worked well. Going to get another pair. 
The strap wrenches should work but they are somewhat fiddle for diddle! 

Edited by Rick A
My bad.
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11 minutes ago, Rick A said:

I saw a post somewhere and the solution was “oil filter” pliers. I have one but you need two, one for each side. I experimented with just the one and it worked well. Going to get another pair. 
The strap wrenches should work but they are somewhat fiddle for diddle! 

Thanks, I'll look into those.

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48 minutes ago, Chuck D said:

I use the same sewer hose as Richard and I'm having a real problem of connecting and disconnecting the bayonet fittings.

This has become more of a problem as I age and I'm at the point where I can't get the fittings apart using my arm strength.

I have lubed them to no avail.

I'm thinking of buying some strap wrenches but would love to here of other "fixes".

Chuck, Camco makes a set of sewer wrenches that specifically fit the Camco sewer hose. Amazon has them. Just search for  Camco sewer hose wrenches.

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6 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

Chuck, Camco makes a set of sewer wrenches that specifically fit the Camco sewer hose. Amazon has them. Just search for  Camco sewer hose wrenches.

They look good and inexpensive. 

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