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Scuff marks from winter skirting


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I took off the skirting on our 2009 Knight 38PKQ today and found that the skirting has left rub marks in our paint.  I’ve tried to take them out with Mothers scratch remover and while the marks are not as visible, they are definitely still there.  Has anybody else had the same problem and if so, how did you correct. Thanks in advance 

Laurice & Jennifer

Fort Steele, BC

2009 Monaco Knight 38PKQ 

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Skirting, like front bras will scrub the clear coat. My experience has been that you can minimize the scuff marks but short of re-doing the clear coat, it is what it is. Someone else may have a better experience but that's what I've been left with....Dennis

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I never understood the point of a front bra on a vehicle, if that is what you are referring to. Is it to keep it nice for the next guy and ugly while it's yours? When home, I work on customer cars, usually high end or classic cars that need to look good and have yet to see a bra that would not leave a mark after a while. Not many use them but if asked to fix it, I'll do it all the way from primer up, to fill the spots. Reclearing by itself will not make the low spots invisible if they're too deep to polish out. After that, the bra usually goes into the trash bin... just my opinion.

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11 hours ago, laurice@email.com said:

I took off the skirting on our 2009 Knight 38PKQ today and found that the skirting has left rub marks in our paint.  I’ve tried to take them out with Mothers scratch remover and while the marks are not as visible, they are definitely still there.  Has anybody else had the same problem and if so, how did you correct. Thanks in advance 

Laurice & Jennifer

Fort Steele, BC

2009 Monaco Knight 38PKQ 

Experience shows that the wind will move the cover repeatedly during storage and cause the scuffing. You might try a power polishing machine and start with a medium grit polish and then finish with a fine grit. A place like Harbor-Freight is a good source for a polisher and polishing cream for home use. Be sure and purchase one that is dual action and variable speed like the one in the link below.

https://tinyurl.com/rumb5jc

 

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This is no different from an automotive paint repair. The biggest problem is that we have no idea how thick the clear coat is and there is a chance to polish through it to the base and then you have a real problem. I would not expect the thickness to be consistent all around the bus either. I use 3M products in 3 steps (from automotive paint dealer), depends how much or little of the clear you have to take out to level the surface to your satisfaction, knowing there is a chance of going too deep.  You may want to start with the final fine grit and see if you can live with it. You need to expect that anything with any grit will dull the shine so you still need to polish it afterwards...

Like Bob said, dual action only and variable speed. Make sure it is really set for dual action since there is usually a mechanism to switch it on or off. Never use just the edge of the buffer wheel and never start it before it is flat against the surface. Never polish sharp edges, tape them off or you WILL  burn through them. YouTube is probably full of videos to help out. Alternatively you can try vibrating polishers, they are cheap, I think safe but not very effective for repairs. I use the ones that look like a big grinder.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/5/2020 at 5:49 PM, Ivan K said:

This is no different from an automotive paint repair. The biggest problem is that we have no idea how thick the clear coat is and there is a chance to polish through it to the base and then you have a real problem. I would not expect the thickness to be consistent all around the bus either. I use 3M products in 3 steps (from automotive paint dealer), depends how much or little of the clear you have to take out to level the surface to your satisfaction, knowing there is a chance of going too deep.  You may want to start with the final fine grit and see if you can live with it. You need to expect that anything with any grit will dull the shine so you still need to polish it afterwards...

Like Bob said, dual action only and variable speed. Make sure it is really set for dual action since there is usually a mechanism to switch it on or off. Never use just the edge of the buffer wheel and never start it before it is flat against the surface. Never polish sharp edges, tape them off or you WILL  burn through them. YouTube is probably full of videos to help out. Alternatively you can try vibrating polishers, they are cheap, I think safe but not very effective for repairs. I use the ones that look like a big grinder.

Thanks very informative.  Much appreciated 

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