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Scissor door stop


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Does anybody know of a way to fix the Scissor doorstop on my 07 Dynasty. I wonder if anybody knows where to find a replacement if it can’t be fixed? Thanks in advance Dahn

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Before you decide to get rid of it, things to know. Take picture of it, you will need to know the amount of stepd, (1,2,or3) Determin the model #, and series # also if it was physically destroid then save the electronics an motor as you are able to purchase a bare bone model an put your electrical on it an save yourself $$$ an time. (Covid has reduced supply of certain parts) the pic is of a sample of info needed, there are just soooo many models to choose from, this Mfg made most of the steps for all recreation vehicles, however it has since been bought out. 0EC4943D-2A74-4A53-97DF-981A53FF40F6.thumb.jpeg.38b4656b5a6df2c4875c49ce6d0a8c82.jpeg

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If you are a member of the Monaco RV Owners Facebook Group there is a pdf document in the files section that gives detailed instructions on replacing the scissor with a gas strut. The file is called Monaco_door_gas_strut_upgrade.pdf. I made the upgrade on my 2000 Signature and it greatly improved the door operation on my rig. If you do the upgrade, measure and plan carefully. Every rig is slightly different with regards to the measurements given.

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Dahn

I have repaired my  Scissor stop on my 2004 Dip several times. In my case it has always been the rivet that has worn and loosened to the extent that the 2 halves of the unit are very loose and catch the door when closing it. I take the unit off by removing the 4 screws on the door frame and drilling out the rivets on the door. Once off it is very easy to knock the loose river out. Then I take the half with the tapered hole to a hardware store and find a flat head, tapered bolt that fits the hole. I use this to make a new rivet by assembling the two sections together then cutting the bolt end to approximately 1/8" - 1/4" beyond the assembled pieces. I hammer that end as flat as possible then grind off the the other tapered side so it is flat with the surface. This method lasts several years and works well for me. Of course you can just buy a new unit for $100+. Just Gopgle it. You might try Veruinks (not sure correct spelling).

Ricardo - 2004 Diplomat - On the road since 1997

 

 

2004 Diplomat

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4 hours ago, rjnontheroad said:

Dahn

I have repaired my  Scissor stop on my 2004 Dip several times. In my case it has always been the rivet that has worn and loosened to the extent that the 2 halves of the unit are very loose and catch the door when closing it. I take the unit off by removing the 4 screws on the door frame and drilling out the rivets on the door. Once off it is very easy to knock the loose river out. Then I take the half with the tapered hole to a hardware store and find a flat head, tapered bolt that fits the hole. I use this to make a new rivet by assembling the two sections together then cutting the bolt end to approximately 1/8" - 1/4" beyond the assembled pieces. I hammer that end as flat as possible then grind off the the other tapered side so it is flat with the surface. This method lasts several years and works well for me. Of course you can just buy a new unit for $100+. Just Gopgle it. You might try Veruinks (not sure correct spelling).

Ricardo - 2004 Diplomat - On the road since 1997

 

 

2004 Diplomat

Good idea, thanks!

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So I removed it and hit it with a air hammer it tightened it up real nice works good for now. I don’t know how long it will last but time will tell. I really like Jim’s idea if this doesn’t last. I really appreciate the help.

Don

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21 hours ago, SteveC said:

If you are a member of the Monaco RV Owners Facebook Group there is a pdf document in the files section that gives detailed instructions on replacing the scissor with a gas strut. The file is called Monaco_door_gas_strut_upgrade.pdf. I made the upgrade on my 2000 Signature and it greatly improved the door operation on my rig. If you do the upgrade, measure and plan carefully. Every rig is slightly different with regards to the measurements given.

This is the best solution after replacing the scissor stop multiple times. We installed the gas strut a couple years ago not only is it a dramatic improvement over the original. It also eliminated a significant amount of road noise emanating from the door area. 
 

the scissor assembly was bouncing in the area above the door making quite a racket. 

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Replace it with a gas strut, it works great and no rattle. Easy fix and you will not be disappointed, I sure wasn't.

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  If you're on the road and want to do a really quick repair that will hold for a while. Get a ladder and two hammers, one a small hand sledge and the other a ball pein. With the door open, position the hand sledge directly under the rivet and then pein the outer edges of rivet. Test the tension on the door until you get the right amount of expansion on the rivet. You can do both sides, without removing the hinge. It should keep it good for a year or two.  

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I just replaced my scissor type with the gas struts.  Easy job, all doors to not match the doors in the examples that are out there.  I spent about an hour measuring and lining up the parts to get it right.  I left the old scissor on to act as a safety should the strut ever fail.  Works great, have not had a wind strong enough yet to close the door.  Total cost for strut and hardware was less than 50 bucks IIRC.

Woody Miller

09 Dynasty

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  • 2 months later...

Used my hydraulic lug crimping tool to “tighten” the rivet.  Worked great. Turned the dies backwards with the flat sides contacting the rivet. Had to use a small washer on one side because the rivet was recessed.  Be careful not to over-tighten. 

06D9F9F6-26DD-44BF-88F9-AEB423FCCA6B.jpeg

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Morning Jim, congradulations on your new to you Monico, i know how much i enjoy my Holiday Rambler… comfortable, easy to drive, the list goes on an on. So when reading your post i got a chuckel, it was about how you were able to get a double duty out of your tool. From someone who has used tools all there life professionally its a cool feeling inside when i can find one that can be used in another way successfully doing some other job👍
Safe an Happy motoring😎

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/4/2022 at 10:38 PM, Jim Pratten said:

Used my hydraulic lug crimping tool to “tighten” the rivet.  Worked great. Turned the dies backwards with the flat sides contacting the rivet. Had to use a small washer on one side because the rivet was recessed.  Be careful not to over-tighten. 

06D9F9F6-26DD-44BF-88F9-AEB423FCCA6B.jpeg

I also have that same tool - now on my todo list is to tighten my front door rivet!

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12 hours ago, Frank McElroy said:

I also have that same tool - now on my todo list is to tighten my front door rivet!

I’m not knocking success….but there has been some discussion in the past.  Some of the less than qualified techs would bend or warp the scissors to add tension.  Works fine….for a while….and in some cases, will actually damage your gaskets,  I know…that happened to me.  Mine was replaced 5 years after purchase which was 2014.  It got worse.  I missed an opportunity to get it fixed by a member who had a shop and a hydraulic press and bought oversized rivets….so I located a guy that had good recommendations…..here is my post from a few years back.  I think,he fixed mine circa 2016 or so.  It is still working well today.  We are not full time, but we do several trips a year and averaged all most 50 nights out per year.

From my post….edited a bit

Hello. Randall Bergen, 249 Cherry Blossom Trail, Dandridge, TN. 37725 - repairs scissor arms - $40. This was a few years ago, so I'd call or email him to check if he is still repairing them. 865-323-1277 rjb4jcpa@gmail.com

I ASSUME HE IS STILL DOING THIS…..  I contacted Randall.  He uses an "OEM" automotive part that is harder and is an exact fit.  He does use the Blacksmith method and brats or beats or peens over the rivet.  Mine was fixed about (updated) 25K miles  ago

OK....NOTES or hints.  First....the Bracket needs to be STRAGHTENED.  Randall will probably do that.  BUT, if you bend it back to where it is CENTERED...as it was originally, that helps. USE IT LIKE HE SENDS IT BACK….don’t do the bending trick…!

Second...  Use SS 3/16 Pop Rivets for the mounting.  They are a PITA to get in.  I used a 15" Tool....it is a two handled one.  You need a LOT of clamping force.  The hand held (single pliers tools) will NOT work.  You will tear up the jaws.  The larger 2x handed tool is great to have and is less than $25.  You can buy a cheap pneumatic one. ....but they don;t last.  The Door Slot will work fine with the SS ones.  SOME folks have installed threaded bushings (similar to a threaded insert put in by a Pop Rivet type tool).

OK…edited….whatever works, but mine is just as tight now, after 6 or more years that’s when Randall fixed it….

 

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A 12lb - 15lb gas spring plus two ball ends would be a lot cheaper than a brand-new scissor arm.

The scissor arm on my 2002 Windsor never gave me any problems during the 18+ years I owned the coach. In fact, it would sometimes lock open by itself when opening the door. Then I would have to give it a nudge to close it.

The 2006 Dynasty that I own now has a scissor arm that doesn't stay opened unless I give the arm a small nudge to lock it open and a small nudge to unlock it to close the door.

Neither of the arms are droopy to the point of interfering with closing the door.

I must be a lucky scissor door owner!

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The real problem is the lack of detent once the rivet starts to wear. Bending the arm can add detent but then the arm often strikes the door frame or rattles as you drive down the road. After fighting the swing arm problem for years and purchasing a new one once I came up with my own fix. I drilled a hole thru the detent bubble (you must use a glass drill bit because the stainless steel is hard)  and used Locktight Red to glue a panhead screw into the center of the detent bubble. Cut off the screw threads so the screw does not protrude below the swing arm. I maintain that the rivet wear is a non-linear process and once it becomes loose it will wear very little. This fix worked for our coach for years.

 

Redneck fix for swing arm.jpg

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