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Clothes Dryer Power Coming From Transfer Switch Directly?


Bill R
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On my 2006 Monaco Windsor 40-PDQ, I have found that the power going to my GE clothes dryer comes directly from the ESCO transfer switch load terminals, through a 20A subpanel, and then to the clothes dryer.  See pics below.  Should I be concerned?

According to the Build Sheet, this coach came with a W/D prep, from the 120V 50A main panel, for a Splendide 2100 which is a combo W/D.  I am thinking that when the previous owner(s) added for a separate clothes dryer, they put in this additional power as described above.

Should I be concerned that this does NOT run through the EMS?  I am thinking since it is a dedicated circuit with a breaker and is NOT tied into anything else, there should NOT be a problem?  

Does anyone else have this arrangement?   Thoughts?

Thank you.

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IMG_1009.jpg.5ffa10255f937142b5ab3f363f44af25.jpg

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Bill, evidently your GE dryer is 220v. When I end up going to a 220v dryer, as I have looked at, I would do the same thing. My problem is getting a dryer that I could get to the end of MH through the bedroom window. Remember, you can't use it on 30 amp or probably your generator, strictly a 50A power supply. Myself, I would connect before the transfer switch since a new supply wire is required.

Gary 05 AMB DST

Edited by Gary 05 AMB DST
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Just now, Gary 05 AMB DST said:

Bill, evidently your GE dryer is 220v. When I end up going to a 220v dryer, as I have looked at, I would do the same thing. My problem is getting a dryer that I could get to the end of MH through the bedroom window. Remember, you can't use it on 30 amp or probably your generator, strictly a 50A power supply.

Gary 05 AMB DST

 

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You are correct that the power won't be recognized by the EMS so if you are on a 30 amp service there is a potential of overloading the 30 amp service since the EMS won't shed enough power. 

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This now makes sense why after I first bought this coach in September last year, and camping with 50A shore power, the 50A shore power tripped a couple of times.  I couldn't figure out why the shore power tripped but the coach 50A breaker did not.  Being that it was 95F outside, I was running both AC's continuously along with the occasional use of other 120V (clothes dryer, washing machine, microwave, coffee maker, hot water heater, hair dryer, etc).   So with the right combination of usage along with the clothes dryer, I see now why the shore power breaker tripped and not the coach panel.

So for the solution, rather than rewiring through the EMS, I am thinking of plugging the washing machine into this dryer outlet, and then the dryer plug into the washing machine outlet, thinking that the dryer pulls a higher amperage load and would be managed by the EMS then.

As a default, we can just manage the use of the clothes dryer being aware of this situation and not overloading the 120V power supply.

 

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Something still isn't right if you tripped a 50 amp breaker on the pedestal.  Do you know what amps the dryer pulls.   In total you have 100 amps available.  There must be amperage on one leg for it to trip.

I can run everything on a 50 amp circuit and have plenty left, have never tripped a 50 amp. 

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13 hours ago, jacwjames said:

Something still isn't right if you tripped a 50 amp breaker on the pedestal.  Do you know what amps the dryer pulls.   In total you have 100 amps available.  There must be amperage on one leg for it to trip.

I can run everything on a 50 amp circuit and have plenty left, have never tripped a 50 amp. 

Thank you James.  Yes, the total is 100 Amps, but each of the legs, L1 & L2 are limited to 50 Amps each.  It is a common spec for 50 A double throw breakers, like those for shore power, is to trip the breaker at 45 Amps for either phase.  

So my Dryer is hooked up to the L1 load line at the Transfer switch.  The L1 line in the coach powers my Front AC, Hot Water Heater, Block Heater and Bedroom.  So when the Hot Water Heater is on, 10-12 Amps, and dryer, 10-12 Amps, and AC at 14-16 Amps, it can be a total of 40 Amps.  I wonder if when the AC starts up and the dryer and hot water heater is on, could this be enough to trip?   This didn't happen very often, maybe 3 times over a period of three months of weekend use.

I am thinking that I am going to put a label on the Dryer to not use it while hot water heater is on 120V heat source.  And see what happens?  

Please let me know if I am off base on anything.  It wouldn't be the first time.

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If you move the dryer to the other leg will there be better load balance? I would not consider the block heater load just manage the loads when it's used. The bedroom is likely just a few amps. Hot water and larger draw kitchen appliances are factors and could require some power management. The charger, MW and other heavy draw appliances can also be a factor. 

An inexpensive Kill A Watt will determine the amp usage. Use it directly for plug in devices. Turn everything off and with an adapter plug the RV power cord into it. Turn on one device at a time to determine amp draw by the difference. If you don't measure the actual amps by some method your are just guessing as a label may be high or is intended for a CB etc. 

 

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1 hour ago, W7BE_Bob said:

If you move the dryer to the other leg will there be better load balance? I would not consider the block heater load just manage the loads when it's used. The bedroom is likely just a few amps. Hot water and larger draw kitchen appliances are factors and could require some power management. The charger, MW and other heavy draw appliances can also be a factor. 

An inexpensive Kill A Watt will determine the amp usage. Use it directly for plug in devices. Turn everything off and with an adapter plug the RV power cord into it. Turn on one device at a time to determine amp draw by the difference. If you don't measure the actual amps by some method your are just guessing as a label may be high or is intended for a CB etc. 

 

Bob - thank you.  I was thinking of possibly moving it to L2 as you suggested, but L2 powers the inverter (kitchen appliances - microwave, coffee pot, toaster oven), Rear AC, Washing Machine, and refrigerator.  So I think L2 would be even a larger draw at times.  This is probably why they decided not to use the washing machine outlet for the dryer.

I plan to use my Amp Meter when I go out again and hooked to 50A shore power.  

Hoping that being more aware of power consumption management will prevent tripping the shore power in the future.  I know a lot of others do the same.

My concern about the dryer not going through the EMS also seems to not be an issue.

11 minutes ago, 96 EVO said:

Until his wife fires up her blow dryer.

LOL Ben - is this from experience?

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Somewhat.

I was once in a park with such poor 30A shore power, I would have to turn off the charger and put the fridge in propane mode, so Sharon could dry her hair!

Without doing so, my surge protector would shut down power to the coach due to low voltage!

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