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Aqua-Hot question


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I am trying to help my step son get information on his Aqua Hot system. When he purchased his Fleetwood he discovered there was a leak in the copper tubing. He can repair the leak but has not been able to find the black material covering the copper coils. Does anyone have any idea what this material is and where it can be purchased?

Thanks for any info 

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Sounds like your son's Aqua-Hot is an older model with the copper heat transfer coils on the outside of the boiler tank. All of the photos I have seen of an older model Aqua-Hot show only the copper coils wrapped around the outside of the tank, then I think there is insulation in between the tank/copper coils and the SS covers.

Not sure what the black stuff would be covering the copper coils unless it is some type of protection cover.

 You can also try John Carrillo at:

https://www.heatmyrv.com/

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10 hours ago, JTerry said:

I am trying to help my step son get information on his Aqua Hot system. When he purchased his Fleetwood he discovered there was a leak in the copper tubing. He can repair the leak but has not been able to find the black material covering the copper coils. Does anyone have any idea what this material is and where it can be purchased?

Thanks for any info 

As someone else already stated I’m assuming it’s a real old model with the domestic hot water coil on the outside of the tank. We ran in to that problem years ago. It was a glue/heat transfer compound. Aqua Hot would never tell what the compound was. They claimed it was proprietary even after they no longer built them that way. (Moved coils inside tank after GRAS antifreeze became common.) The main problem they had with this compound was after a few years this compound after many cycles of hot and cold would crack up and fall apart. Dust to Dust as they say. When this happened very little tank heat would transfer to the coils. We tried several different brands of old furnace cement to repair them, that didn’t work. We finally tried the glue that automotive brake manufacturers use to glue the the fiction material to the steel backing plate on disk brake pads. We repaired 4 or 5 units with this compound back in 2004 to 2008. To the best of my knowledge they are still in use. An employee at a company called Ambrake got this compound for us. He has since passed away. I don’t know where you can obtain any now. You might try Raybestos brakes. They might be the easiest to deal with.

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  • Solution

It's a material called Thermal Mastic.  It promotes heat transfer & is used quite often in manufacturing.   Propane refrigerators such as Nocold & Dometic use it.  Here is one by Norcold.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/334927440990?var=0&mkevt=1&mkcid=1&mkrid=711-53200-19255-0&campid=5338590836&toolid=10044&customid=8fc23e69bc541ea82f535a93ad017881                   

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11 hours ago, radioman said:

We tried the refrigerator stuff years ago. It didn’t stand up to the 185F degree heat. After two heat cycles it just crumbles away. Maybe they have changed it.

That's great info and I doubt they have changed it.  I haven't used it, it was just an easy find.   Here is another one that may be better suited, it mentions good to 212 deg.  https://www.supplyhouse.com/Parker-Hannifin-475313-PM21-Thermal-Mastic-1-Gallon?utm_source=bingad&utm_medium=shopping&msclkid=9007c92ce8b3135f0428add7ce9b3b6e

Call them & you might find an even better product.  

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That might get the job done. I know Parker makes great products. They are known to under rate and out perform. You could call one of the Parker stores (most cities have at least one) and see if they could get you a sample. Keep in mind you are not only looking for Thermo transfer but a glueing properties also. The original Hydro Hot product failed because the coil became unglued from the tank. There has been a lot of new bonding products in the last 11 years.Tesla uses at least 12 different glues on the model S

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