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I posted this on FB but felt it would be a good idea to share here as well.  

I'm working on fixing the dreaded slide rot issue and want to document the process to help others who might want to tackle this project themselves. I'll update this post daily with my progress to make it easier to follow, and I'll add all photos to this first post for easy viewing.
Day 1
Finally decided to dive in and repair the rotten floor on the slide. I wish I had a game plan, but I figured I'd start by removing all the furniture from the slide floor and pulling up the carpet to assess the damage. From my pictures you can see the top side looked fine, but it really isn't.
So after removing the carpet, I used a hammer to tap the floor and determine which areas were solid and which weren't. I decided to cut out a 4-foot section of the bad wood. I extended the slide out to about 2 inches from fully open and used floor jacks and wood to raise each end of the slide. I blocked the inside corners of the slide to raise the floor slightly above the main floor of the coach. Then, I supported the outside corners and center of the slide with jacks.
Next, I made a list of materials needed to replace the section of flooring. After a trip to Home Depot, I came back with a sheet of 1/2-inch sanded plywood, 1/16-inch PVC sheet, contact cement, wood glue, 16-gauge steel sheet metal, and some screws. Since Home Depot offers free cuts, I had them cut the plywood sheet in half to double up the sheets for the 1-inch thickness needed. I glued and screwed the two half sheets together and clamped them, allowing 24 hours for the glue to dry.
The part I dreaded most was cutting the floor. I marked my line and started with a circular saw, setting the depth to 3/4 inch to avoid cutting into something I shouldn't. After the initial cut, I lowered the blade to cut through completely. I used a sawzall to cut further until I hit the metal bracket supporting the slide and the outside wall. Then, I made another perpendicular cut to help remove the rotten wood. The rotten wood practically fell out, held in place only by the factory PVC bonded to the top and bottom of the floor. Using saws, chisels, and a cutting knife, I removed the bad wood.
I encountered issues where the bad floor extended under the side and outside walls, with screws inside the wall securing it. I didn't want to cut the wall paneling to remove these screws, as that would create additional work down the road. trying to cut them with the sawzall is challenging because the screws were loose and I couldn't cut them. So I removed as much of the old floor as I could before it got late.
As I ponder my next move for tomorrow, I think removing some of the wall to access the screws might save time in the long run. The hardest part tomorrow will be finishing the cut between the outside wall and the metal support below it. I have a multi-tool, but I'm not sure it will go deep enough under the wall. Check back for Day 2 to see how it goes.

DAY 2

I decided the best way to remove those hidden screws was to cut open the wall and remove a section for access. I measured up 12 inches, scored it with a knife, and used my multi-tool to cut the paneling. Initially, it didn't want to come out, so I cut deeper because I felt styrofoam behind the wall panels. Once I did that, I could feel the wall board starting to release. With careful prying, I managed to get it off, exposing the wall studs and other insulation. This gave me easy access to the screws, which I then removed.
After removing all the screws, I was able to take out the last bit of the old floor. With that done, I cleaned up the area and began measuring for the new floor.
However, I ran into another issue: the angle cut of the floor was greater than 45 degrees, so my table saw or circular saw wouldn't work as I had hoped. After some thought, I decided to fasten a 6x6 post on the table saw to rest my new floor on and increase the angle of my cut. I apologize for not getting any photos of the process—I was quite frustrated and just wanted to keep things moving.
Once the angle cut was done, I re-measured and made a straight cut on the backside of the floor. I then did a test fit. It looked like it would be tight to get into place, but I'll deal with that when the time comes.
Next, it was time to attach the plastic sheeting to the bottom and top of the new floor. I cut the sheet slightly larger than the floor and used contact cement to fasten the plastic sheeting to the wood. I did one side, trimmed the excess plastic with a knife, then proceeded to do the other side. Once the plastic sheeting was bonded to the wood, I painted the edges to protect them from moisture.
It is 7 PM and 92 degrees out. I am considering calling it a day and getting something to eat. Maybe I'll try to get the new floor in place tonight, but time will tell. I hope my description and photos help someone in the future who needs to do the same repair and doesn't want to spend thousands for someone else to do it. So far, the cost is just under $200, including another pump jack.
Day 3
Managed to get the new floor in place. It took some effort to coax it into position. I found that moving the slide in and out helped align it properly. Also when you put the screw back in through the bottom of the wall into the floor use a jack under the bottom side to get the floor as tight to the bottom of the wall as possible. I still need to plate the top, so I'll be ordering Guardian plates and seeing if they can send a flat plate for the bottom side seam as well. When replacing the floor, I recommend using something like the Guardian plate to secure the bottom of the floor to the side wall. Without it, I noticed a tendency for the floor to bow slightly. There's a small gap where the new and old floor meet, and I'll try to fill it with silicone to eliminate the void.
Given that this was the third day of working in temperatures in the mid-90s, I didn't accomplish much more besides cleaning up, putting away tools, and going out to look at carpet and LVT tile. Since I'm already this far into tearing things apart, I might as well continue with a remodel and replace the carpet and tile. I'm considering LVT tile for the main part of the coach and carpet for the slides and bedroom.
I'm on a tight timeframe since we're leaving on a trip in three weeks. Tomorrow, I plan to remove as much carpet and tile as possible and plate the top side of the slide floor. Oh, and I also installed a Micro-Air thermostat today.

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This is a great write-up.  Very professionally done.

It should also be required reading so that members will inspect the underside and corner joints of their slides annually.  It validates the decision, for literally, hundreds of members, to install Guardian plates to prevent damage to the underside or to keep a small or potentially a water leak on the sidewall frame from becoming a major repair.

Thanks again for posting.  Great Job.

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5 hours ago, Tom Cherry said:

This is a great write-up.  Very professionally done.

It should also be required reading so that members will inspect the underside and corner joints of their slides annually.  It validates the decision, for literally, hundreds of members, to install Guardian plates to prevent damage to the underside or to keep a small or potentially a water leak on the sidewall frame from becoming a major repair.

Thanks again for posting.  Great Job.

I completely agree with you; issues like mine can potentially be avoided by annual inspections. I bought this motorhome two years ago, fully aware that there was a problem that needed attention. However, the extent of the damage was unknown at the time because it was well hidden beneath the slide carpet and above the plastic sheeting on the underside of the floor. Eventually, it reached a point where I felt it was unsafe to extend the slide, and I had to address the issue. Additionally, we have been looking for a new motorhome, and I cannot, in good conscience, sell this one in its current condition.

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