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2004 Monaco Monarch SE - 37'

Our new, to us, RV has some significant flooring issues from a leaky ice maker and I'm pretty sure I'm going to need new subflooring all the way down to the beams when I pull up the linoleum.  So I have few questions.

1.       What would you recommend for a replacement subflooring material?  And how to protect the bottom?

2.       What are the advantages of “engineered flooring”?

3.       Have you every put in electric floor heat under the engineered flooring?  Is that doable?

4.       I think we are going to put new carpeting on the slide out rather than hard floor so we don’t have to deal with the slide out edge rise and fall when it’s in and out.  Any thoughts on that?

Hope you are doing well.
Thanks for your time and recommendations.

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Here's a post that I had done starting last Dec.   Others did comment throughout the project.  Ernie will be the best to comment on types of flooring etc.

I did have to replace a ~4X6' piece of subfloor down to the metal subframe.  I did the best I could to salvage the original vapor barrier, and when laying the new subfloor down I spread liquid nail and then used a roller to press it back up against the wood.  Long term won't know if it worked for a while.

Othe

Edited by jacwjames
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All this depends on how much damage you have. There should be 2 layers of osb and some felt sandwiched between. I usually just go back with some good hardwood plywood.

Engineered wood is dimensionally stable and when adhered with urethane adhesive stays put and look fabulous. That is all the material I have installed for decades without issues. I have engineered wood in our home and all of our coaches. Dogs, cats, grandkids- we got ‘em.

radiant heat under engineered wood, is not advised, according to the manufacturer we consulted. 
You can put radiant heat under ceramic tile but ceramic tile adds 5 + pounds per square foot to the weight of the coach. Routing the wires for the heat gets quite involved. Plus the cost of the radiant material we have used pushes around $1000. Ernie Ekberg 

 

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