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repair or replace broken toilet floor flange


 Jim McGarvie
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I guess all those bumpy roads over 20 years finally caused the weight of our toilet to break the floor flange where the closet bolts go through. I am inclined to use a repair ring, if I can find one, rather than replace it for two reasons: I have not yet been able to remove any of the 8 screws fastening the flange to the floor, and I'm afraid the flange might be cemented into the pipe leading to the holding tank.

I think something like this might be perfect, but I need slots for four closet bolts rather than just two, and so far I have been unable to find one:

https://www.amazon.com/Oatey-42778-Grommets-4-Inch-Stainless/dp/B003FX6ED6/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=stainless+toilet+flange+ring&qid=1595854362&sr=8-3

Our toilet is a Dometic Sealand 511H.

Thank you for any suggestions!

Jim

B5FEFF80-D13A-45B5-90C6-DCC5170B6F3A_1_105_c.jpeg

Edited by Jim McGarvie
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I took a piece of 1 x 2  and a 3/8 dowel and drilled two holes in it and inserted the dowel sticking out about a 1/2 inch so that the dowels fit in the two cot outs that is in the flange used the 1x2 as a spanner wrench to unscrew and screw the new one back own

and by the way you couldn't

tell it was screwed on just by looking

I took a dremel tool  with a grinding disk on it and cut a slot so I could use a big screwdriver to get them out

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Adding to Gary Roberson's suggestion: Use an Impact Driver , starting at low torques, to start moving the screws without snapping them off. Be patient and go in both backward and forward directions. Gradually increase torque so you don't ruin screw slots. Push down very hard as you go.

If you don't own the Dremel or the Driver, Harbor Freight has inexpensive ones that will do the job. A good investment even if you will never use these again.

 

 

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1 hour ago, bobdinsmore said:

Adding to Gary Roberson's suggestion: Use an Impact Driver , starting at low torques, to start moving the screws without snapping them off. Be patient and go in both backward and forward directions. Gradually increase torque so you don't ruin screw slots. Push down very hard as you go.

If you don't own the Dremel or the Driver, Harbor Freight has inexpensive ones that will do the job. A good investment even if you will never use these again.

 

 

Thanks Gary and Bob, I will try the Dremel and impact driver tricks.

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UPDATE:

The Dremel and impact wrench worked, and I removed the screws. I was able to read a part number on the flange, in very small print (for these eyes, anyway), and googled it. Turns out that sure 'nuff, it is a screw-in flange. Armed with that encouragement I used a spanner wrench (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004FDL3BS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1) and with some considerable effort (I think they used glue for pipe dope) I was able to remove the flange. I have ordered the replacement and a new seal, and cautiously optimistic that the remainder of the project will be fairly straightforward.

Thanks to all who helped.

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