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Brake Dust Rear Rims


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Did not see brakes as a category for posting.

We just returned from a trip and when putting on tire covers I noticed excessive brake dust accumulation on the rims of both rear wheels, most on passenger side.   Had brakes checked in 2018, 85% at that time.  Coach is 2007 Holiday Rambler Endeavor. Should I be concerned about this or is it normal.  We live in Oregon and most trips have come mountains with 6% grades.

Appreciate any help. 

 

Ray

Edited by Wrayj1
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No worries. It is normal as the rear brakes do a majority of the work and considering the grades you encountered I’m sure they were busy. Just be sure to utilize your engine/exhaust brake. 

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Here's a link to a site showing minimum thickness for brake drum/discs for OTR trucks. 

https://www.freightbrokerscourse.com/blog/2012/02/17/dot-truck-brake-lining/

When I first bought our coach ~12 years ago I did a visual inspection of a brakes drum pads and noted the thickness, much more then minimum requirement.  Since then everytime I go under the coach and look at the pads, after +50K miles I can't see that they've worn at all.  I take a picture every year. 

I'd suggest you do the same thing to give you a reference.

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Keep in mind that those pads have a life expectancy of 500k miles on a semi, so unless overly heat stressed by in-proper use (lack of using engine brake) you will never have to worry about wearing them out. It is likely that you will not be able to notice any wear at all year of year. 

Edited by Chargerman
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Ray, the brake shoes have a V cut in the shoe. When that V is gone, it is time to replace the shoes. That is how the state truck inspectors judge the life of the brakes. I always thought that was the joint between two brake shoes.

Gary 05 AMB DST

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42 minutes ago, Gary 05 AMB DST said:

Ray, the brake shoes have a V cut in the shoe. When that V is gone, it is time to replace the shoes. That is how the state truck inspectors judge the life of the brakes. I always thought that was the joint between two brake shoes.

Gary 05 AMB DST

I learned something new today 👍

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