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2215 fault code


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Was heading out to go camping, just left the house (still in sight) and the engine just quit and produced this 2215 code.  Anyone have some tips as to where to start?  Have not had any issues whatsoever with engine performance, however i will be starting with the basics and changing the fuel filters.  They appear to be quite old, I just purchased this coach about 2 months ago.  
Fuel level was just now confirmed not an issue.

2005 Monaco, 5.9 Cummins. 
 

Thanks folks. 

Edited by BradHend
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45 minutes ago, BradHend said:

Was heading out to go camping, just left the house (still in sight) and the engine just quit and produced this 2215 code.  Anyone have some tips as to where to start?  Have not had any issues whatsoever with engine performance, however i will be starting with the basics and changing the fuel filters.  They appear to be quite old, I just purchased this coach about 2 months ago.  
Fuel level was just now confirmed not an issue.

2005 Monaco, 5.9 Cummins. 
 

Thanks 

Engine just quit?.....sounds like fuel pressure. Those engines require a lot of pressure. Without a scanner it's hard to pinpoint exactly what's wrong. 

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Charles, yes, the engine just quit.  Was coming up to the first stop sign by my house; so just started applying the brakes and she died.  No warning signs or anything.   Father in law helped tow me back home so as of now it hasn’t cost me too much yet.  😂

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If you can check for fuel at the injectors you can eliminate the lift pump. Beyond that I can only guesstimate......I'd definitely check the fuel pressure relief valve at the end of the fuel rail......common problem on cummins engines. If the relief valve gets stuck open.....no pressure. That's the best case scenario.....

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How long had it been sitting?  I've been through 2 primary fuel filters since Feb / 13k miles.  Mine doesn't sit but it did sit most of 2020 (previous owner). 

- bob

 

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CBR046, It had been sitting for about 2 weeks, however I had it running without incident the day before this happened for about 8 minutes.  Was just checking and listening to things and letting the air build up so I could move it over a smidge in the driveway.  Did find the water pump mounting bolts loose and the belt for it is going to need replacing soon as well.

 
Flyinhy, got the old man coming over to assist today, will see what we can find. 

Appreciate all the input eh.  Thanks again!

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How old is the fuel.

When you change the filters open them up and see if there is any signs of algae.

I had algae when I first bought my coach, when I changed the primary filter it was almost completely stopped up though the rig was still operating.  I did some research and started to use Biobor, especially if I'm going to park my rig for a while.  When I started building our new house I knew we weren't going to be using the rig for a while.   This has worked well for me. 

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Jacwjames, I filled it up with new fuel when I got it home from the seller, after changing the  fuel filters yesterday, I see no evidence of algae.  

I think I’ve narrowed it down to a bad pressure sensor on the high pressure common rail, or a bad high pressure pump.  Will need to get a gauge made up so I can check the PSI on the rail while cranking to see if it’s within spec,  from what I’ve read it should be around 100psi.  If that checks out, I’ll buy a new pressure sensor.  If that still doesn’t do it, guess I’ll need to send her in and get ready to bend over. 😢

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11 minutes ago, BradHend said:

Jacwjames, I filled it up with new fuel when I got it home from the seller, after changing the  fuel filters yesterday, I see no evidence of algae.  

I think I’ve narrowed it down to a bad pressure sensor on the high pressure common rail, or a bad high pressure pump.  Will need to get a gauge made up so I can check the PSI on the rail while cranking to see if it’s within spec,  from what I’ve read it should be around 100psi.  If that checks out, I’ll buy a new pressure sensor.  If that still doesn’t do it, guess I’ll need to send her in and get ready to bend over. 😢

Glad to see you're narrowing it down.....hopefully it's not the pump. 100 psi? Seems awfully low for that engine...

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I got the code from the on board diagnostic, turn the key on, fully depress the gas pedal 3 times and the code is flashed via the “stop engine” light. 

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I am not familiar with the Cummins 5.9.

First suggestion would be to set up an account on the Cummins Quickserve site.  When you try and create an account it will take you to a page that shows 4 subscription options, just choose the free one and go through the steps to create and account.  They recently changed this and people have been reporting problems so be patient, it is well worth the effort.  You will be able to research how to troubleshoot these codes with detailed bulletins and drawings. 

I have done multiple searches on the 2215 code and the ones that reported resolution said it was a fuel delivery problem (leak) at the lift pump.  Have you checked the lift pump, I know on my 8.3ISC engine the lift pump is a known issue.  Mine started leaking last year so I bit the bullet this year and installed a FASS pump and abandoned the old lift pump. 

~10 years ago I went ahead an bought a Silverleaf VMSpc that monitors all the engine parameters and will provide fault codes.  One of the best things I ever did. 

 

Edited by jacwjames
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After spending most of the weekend diagnosing and learning how the fuel system works and different ways of checking things, I came to the conclusion that it had to be the high pressure injection pump. Could not for the life of me get pressure to build up on the rail.  Sure enough, took out the CP3 pump just now and decided to investigate.   Dont need to explain much with those pictures.  
Getting a refurbed unit from a local guy for about $1300 Canadian.   Just to clarify also, my coach has started, idled and ran absolutely fine since I got it.  When this happened, it was basically at an idle approaching a yield sign.  I believe this is a good check for anyone that experiences a similar issue of not being able to build up  pressure and a 2215 fault - take that aluminum cover off, which is easily accessible, and check for a broken shaft.  Takes a bit of guess work out of the equation.  
I appreciate and thank everyone that chimed in on this.  Only thing that concerns me now is was it just the shafts time to go, or is there an underlying issue?

Will Hopefully be putting the replacement in this weekend, time and weather permitting.  I’ll keep yas posted.

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Edited by BradHend
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Flyinhy, I’ve heard all kinds of numbers,  but the average seems to be around 5-7K PSI minimum during cranking to get it to fire.  
 

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52 minutes ago, BradHend said:

Flyinhy, I’ve heard all kinds of numbers,  but the average seems to be around 5-7K PSI minimum during cranking to get it to fire.  
 

That sounds more like it. On the older mechanical 5.9.....pressures were 20k. I don't think it's an underlying issue either. Again....good job!

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Update on the 2215 fault:

The MoHo is alive again! Installed the new CP3 pump, ensured the supply side was clear of air (I had previously changed the fuel filters as first step of troubleshooting) and she fired on the third crank. Took her for a test drive for some diesel and she seems to be running just fine.  
Little tip for anyone who has to change their CP3 with the same setup as me however… When you loosen the rail supply line clamp that is right beside the pump, don’t use a 10mm ratchet wrench that only works one way (no ratchet selection) like I did. 🤬 I was loosening it off in the dark with a flashlight and just as it was getting loose and I figured it would come out, it started getting tight again:

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Yup.  Got it wedged up on the hose connector and couldn’t get the darn bolt out.  Silver lining was that it was a swivel wrench, so I was able to separate it and hand turn it in enough until the ratchet piece could fall off.  Bit of a pain, but lesson learned none the less.  
Thanks again everyone for the input.  Truly appreciated and so lucky to have access to a site like this.  

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