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Battery Desulfurization


Jdw12345
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For half the money I would buy a pulse maintainer 3 stage charger. Does it desulfate a battery??? The one I have seems to bring back to life a battery that is very low on charge BUT with nothing to compare it against, who really knows.

You should have a equalization cycle in your charger and rice a year it’s not a bad idea to let it charge your batteries at a higher voltage… not AGMs.

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4 hours ago, Jdw12345 said:

Just wondering if anyone has used this product or anything similar and your opinion of such a product?

 

https://www.pulsetech.net/pp-12-l-powerpulse-12-volt-battery-maintenance-system.html

 

   Thanks!

I use a battery maintainer that I get from Costco.  $45 . Seems to help a lot especially when the coach is sitting for a time. As long as you have power near by. 

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I installed a Power Pulse in 2015, I had installed new batteries in ~2012, I just changed them this year after one died.   I was satisfied with how long the batteries lasted and provided good service until one just up and died. 

If you do equalize your batteries make sure to read the instructions, it isn't as simple as just pushing a button on the display. 

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So much has been said about batteries on this forum that I've been reluctant to add my voice. I've been involved in battery care and maintenance most of my life both by occupation and hobby. I've worked with battery banks, stationary batteries and fleet batteries and I'm a long time RVer. Here is what I've found to be true:

Unless your RV is very old it probably came with a 3 stage charger/converter. The best thing you can do for your batteries is keep your RV plugged in when it's not in use. The 3 stage charger will charge the batteries rapidly at first then throttle back to a medium charge and finally go to float or a maintenance charge. This ideal and pretty hard to beat with any supplemental charger. You should be able to leave your RV plugged in for extended periods without worrying about water loss, freezing or sulfation.   Do check your battery water before storage. Letting it get below the top of the plates is detrimental.

Some motorhomes charge the chassis battery when plugged in and some don't. My didn't so I converted it so it does. That's another subject.

The worst thing you can do to your lead acid batteries is to discharge them below 50%. The further you go past 50% discharge the shorter their life will be and discharging them 100% is an absolute no no. Also, the longer they sit discharged the worse it is. Try to charge them as soon as possible anytime they get run down.

If a battery has been abused those pulse chargers might coax a tiny bit of life out it but not much.

Some will disagree with me but I wouldn't spend the extra money on AGM batteries unless you need them for an enclosed space (no fumes) or you really need maintenance free. Otherwise I don't think they perform any better than flooded batteries. I buy the 6 volt golf cart batteries from Costco. Golf cart batteries are rugged and they're built for deep discharging and I think they give you the biggest bang for your buck. Mine are 4 years old and going strong.

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48 minutes ago, Tom Wallis said:

So much has been said about batteries on this forum that I've been reluctant to add my voice. I've been involved in battery care and maintenance most of my life both by occupation and hobby. I've worked with battery banks, stationary batteries and fleet batteries and I'm a long time RVer. Here is what I've found to be true:

Unless your RV is very old it probably came with a 3 stage charger/converter. The best thing you can do for your batteries is keep your RV plugged in when it's not in use. The 3 stage charger will charge the batteries rapidly at first then throttle back to a medium charge and finally go to float or a maintenance charge. This ideal and pretty hard to beat with any supplemental charger. You should be able to leave your RV plugged in for extended periods without worrying about water loss, freezing or sulfation.   Do check your battery water before storage. Letting it get below the top of the plates is detrimental.

Some motorhomes charge the chassis battery when plugged in and some don't. My didn't so I converted it so it does. That's another subject.

The worst thing you can do to your lead acid batteries is to discharge them below 50%. The further you go past 50% discharge the shorter their life will be and discharging them 100% is an absolute no no. Also, the longer they sit discharged the worse it is. Try to charge them as soon as possible anytime they get run down.

If a battery has been abused those pulse chargers might coax a tiny bit of life out it but not much.

Some will disagree with me but I wouldn't spend the extra money on AGM batteries unless you need them for an enclosed space (no fumes) or you really need maintenance free. Otherwise I don't think they perform any better than flooded batteries. I buy the 6 volt golf cart batteries from Costco. Golf cart batteries are rugged and they're built for deep discharging and I think they give you the biggest bang for your buck. Mine are 4 years old and going strong.

In my travel trailer, which I just sold this fall, I had a pair of 6-volt golf cart batteries, they were basically Trojan knock offs by a local commercial battery supplier (240AH). 

I was careful to never let the water get below the top of the plates, rarely drained them below 50% capacity, and not for long if I did, as recommended above, and put them on a shelf in my garage in the winter on a very small maintainer.

These batteries were 12 years old when I sold the unit. They were starting to show their age, with frequent buildup on the posts, etc. However, we were able to complete a successful 4 night dry camp in Jasper this summer without draining them below 50%. Best battery experience of my life.

Looking to use LiFePo4 for the house batteries in my new rig, but failing that 6-volt flooded would be my next choice for sure.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, the reason I asked was that a new to us 05 Dynasty has 7 year old 4 Fullriver DC250 6V house batteries, I was just wondering if the PO was just sold a product that really worked and if I should keep them on the batteries. I’m questioning if I should just replace the batteries or just see how far they will go. I’m somewhat confused as the battery condition seems to drop while going down the road and then when we would stop the battery condition would actually get better…..  I’m quite sure my Big Boy is not working correctly while rolling down the road, so I’m going to service that this winter while at home, the chassis batteries need to be on a stand along charger/maintainer when the coach is on shore power.  
 

Thanks for everyone’s advice!

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