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How to Route Heavier Gage Wire to Refigerator in Slide.


johnfr
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We have a 2007 Cayman 36PDQ. I am in the process of converting our Norcold fridge to a JC Refrigeration 12V Hvac compressor system. Today we pulled the fridge and made the changeover to the Hvac cooling system. I tested it with a separate deep cycle battery in the coach and the fridge is operational. The fridge resides in a cavity in the drivers side slide out. The current 12V wiring to the fridge cavity is 16 gauge which is inadequate to handle the 7.5 amps of run & peak currents that the fridge requires. I need to pull 10 gauge wire from the battery bay. I can see 2 separate telescoping plastic tube that all the current wiring for the slide out runs in. These tubes disappear into the bowels of the coach above the bays. I am curious if anyone has attempted this process and if so how they went about it?   

Edited by johnfr
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  • johnfr changed the title to How to Route Heavier Gage Wire to Refigerator in Slide.
9 hours ago, johnfr said:

We have a 2007 Cayman 36PDQ. I am in the process of converting our Norcold fridge to a JC Refrigeration 12V Hvac compressor system. Today we pulled the fridge and made the changeover to the Hvac cooling system. I tested it with a separate deep cycle battery in the coach and the fridge is operational. The fridge resides in a cavity in the drivers side slide out. The current 12V wiring to the fridge cavity is 16 gauge which is inadequate to handle the 7.5 amps of run & peak currents that the fridge requires. I need to pull 10 gauge wire from the battery bay. I can see 2 separate telescoping plastic tube that all the current wiring for the slide out runs in. These tubes disappear into the bowels of the coach above the bays. I am curious if anyone has attempted this process and if so how they went about it?   

I have run wires out of a slide through those tubes and into the bay overhead.  If your invertor is closer than the battery's you can use it as your source assuming it has a large enough wire to the battery's.   Be sure to fill the holes when you are done to keep the critters out.

Edited by Hypoxia
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Per NEC Ampacity chart 16 gauge copper wire rated 90 deg. is rated for up to 13 Amps continuous current.  This is for an enclosed conductor, such as inside a conduit.

If the conductor is Romex and has enough air around it to cool, then 16 gauge will support up to 22 Amp.  I would venture to say all copper conductors used in a coach to conduct current is rated @ 90 deg.  Just clean the corrosion off the ends and re-terminate, you are fine.

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Wondering if the instructions from JC Refrigeration calls for 10 gauge wire?    10 gauge certainly will not hurt but it does seem a little over sized.

The Norcold  has a 120v wire too ( don't know the gauge ) , that perhaps it can be converted to 12v.  Actually it may have 2 120v wires ( mine does ) one is for the         ice maker the other is for the frig cooling.  

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14 hours ago, Hypoxia said:

I have run wires out of a slide through those tubes and into the bay overhead.  If your invertor is closer than the battery's you can use it as your source assuming it has a large enough wire to the battery's.   Be sure to fill the holes when you are done to keep the critters out.

This afternoon I managed to get a snake though the tube and route the two #10 wires to the fridge location. Rest of the task will be much easier. Will enclose the wires in a loom to protect them from rubbing on surrounding metal edges. Thanks for the suggestion Hyposia.

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3 hours ago, wamcneil said:

And a fuse at the battery, right??? 👍

Absolutely! Purchased an inline fuse holder when I bought the wire along with some 15 amp fuses.

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