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2000 signature power shut off


Romeo84
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OK so I may have left my house battery bank On for the past 2 months while the coach was in storage. I have AGM batteries which I'm pretty sure We're completely dead. ( Only talking about house battery bank Chassis battery bank is perfectly fine as I have a battery tender on them all the time).

Started the coach up  And went for a drive warming up the generator and engine for about an hour.

   After I turned the  Generator and engine off everything  Inside went dead after about 3 minutes. 

 Puzzled .. i started the coach back up and everything came back online after about 2 minutes.  After shutting it off everything  Turn off after a minute or so.

My question is... is this a sign of a bad inverter or just the house batteries could not be brought backup to charge and were dead. 

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It is not likely your inverter.  And you say "everything" did you have 110VAC items, like the microwave, ON?  I suspect you mean all the 12 volt house things (lights, fans, maybe water pump) went dead.   It's important to know exactly, because they are two separate systems, and that involves two separate troubleshooting paths.  

I'm going to assume you meant the 12 Volt side.  While you were driving, the alternator should have been trying to charge up both sets of batteries.  If all the 12 volt things went off shortly after turning off the engine, whose alternator was supplying 12 Volts, I'd say gout batteries are shot.  But to confirm, you need to measure the voltage at the batteries.  If below 11 Volts, you can try charging each battery independently, with an external battery charger.  If they seem to accept a charge, then do a load test to determine their capacity. 

Of I made incorrect assumptions, please provide additional details. 

  - Rick N.

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No I think your spot on. I really mean everything went dead 110 and 12v. Except on the ignition side. Started head lamps etc. Didn't have a voltmeter on me but that was my next step. 

And to be clear the  Batteries would have to be disconnected and brought back 1 by 1 correct?

Thanks for the input 

Rya 

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Sounds like the house batteries have had only an hour to charge, is that right?  I would measure the voltage.  Then put them on a battery tender with the house disconnect turned off for at least 24 hours and measure the voltage again.  (I did the same thing last winter to my chassis batteries and fortunately they had enough voltage not to freeze.  They recharged on a battery tender in a few days, and all is well. I did not charge them separately. )

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Ok on the 110VAC.  I assume you were not plugged into shore power.  This still leads directly to the batteries not being alkyd to provide power to the inverter.  

Depending on your changer, you might be able to charge as a group.  You certitude can charge 2 6-volt batteries in series.  The problem arises when you put dead batteries in parallel - they can hide what's going on.  Same goes for load testing.   Right now, you on board charger/ inverter is isolated from the batteries.  If below 10.5 Volts, it disconnects itself to prevent damage to both itself and the batteries.  That is why you'll; have to use an external charger. 

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Thats the plan this weekend,  I do have to disconnect the house bank and charge them 1 by 1 correct  Because they are wired and series..

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Everything I was thinking...was just wondering about the inverter. Figured I would have to charge them up individually.... considering this resolved.. unless charging them doesn't fix it.

 

Thanks for your input help response!!

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On 10/15/2021 at 12:15 PM, Steve P said:

Sounds like the house batteries have had only an hour to charge, is that right?  I would measure the voltage.  Then put them on a battery tender with the house disconnect turned off for at least 24 hours and measure the voltage again.  (I did the same thing last winter to my chassis batteries and fortunately they had enough voltage not to freeze.  They recharged on a battery tender in a few days, and all is well. I did not charge them separately. )

I vote with Steve. Realistically you cannot even charge one 6volt deep cycle in 1 hour. All may not be lost. I could be wrong but it is my understanding that AGM batteries can survive a deep discharge much better than a lead acid and still have the ability to come back. 

Ken

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