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Why drop the air to level coach?


Blacknight
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I have a 2007 Knight and the book says to extend the slides and then drop the air in the bags and level the coach. I always use 6x6 blocks under the leveling jacks for support. Why (or what advantages) do you gain by letting the air out of the system. I think being "aired up" would support the slides and maybe not over flex the air bags. What do you do?

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The reason to drop the air first is to help ensure that the jacks are extended the minimal amount to level the rig.

On mine, the auto level drops the bags, then extends until the system sees pressure on each leg.  So it then knows it has touched "ground" (or blocks).  I then raises the low side in pairs to keep the chassis from twisting.

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You do not use the same procedure to Level a coach that has Jacks as you would use to level a coach that has Air Leveling only.

If your coach is equipped with electric slides the procedures are different than if you have all Hydraulic slides.

It is highly recommended that you follow the instructions in your owners manual for your particular coach.

Most owners have their own variations of leveling and extending/retracting the slide outs on their particular model coach based on their own experience, but that does not mean it will work for someone else. Following the procedures in the owners manual will keep you out of trouble in most cases.

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“It is highly recommended that you follow the instructions in your owners manual foryour particular coach.”

Sometimes that can be kind of hard to do when the owner’s manual says different things in different sections.  My ‘05 Holiday Rambler manual doesn’t mention dropping the air before leveling in the main section but does tell you to do it in the boondocking section.

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Another reason to dump the air, is to have the coach lower to the ground.  It will be less susceptible to wind movement, and, more importantly, you won't need a step ladder to get into the coach.  I find it amusing to see coaches with additional steps to get to the steps, while the coach is sitting at ride height.  Granted, many of those coaches may not have air suspensions (we tend to them for granted) and therefore can't drop the coach lower, but it still looks odd when sitting next to a coach the is kneeling on the ground next to it.

 

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