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Engine Shutdown


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Started for Fl. and Cummins 8.3 shut down 25 miles from home. Just had filters replaced 3 days before and was suspect of air leak, etc. Called a service company who was working on a semi not far from where I was and said he would be there shortly. Waited for half an hour and decided to try to restart. Started right up , called mobile tec back and he recommended trying to drive it to Pilot, which was 2 miles away, that way getting it off busy I94 In Mi. and he would meet me there. He showed up, checked filters, no leaks, and then opened rear access to engine. Looked around and spotted my overflow tank cap was just sitting on it and not screwed on. Also fluid was low. I suspect the shop that I took it to was going to check fluid and forgot. Anyway, he added fluid and suspected the sensor was above the fluid ling and thus the shutdown. I left the Pilot and engine shutdown 5 more times and I was able to coast to a stop off the highway each time. The last time It shut down was in Indy on the Keystone Pkwy. Each time it would shut down completely and then restart almost immediatly. Since it was a Sunday, I decided to stay in Indy and get it serviced the next day. AS it turned out all the campgrounds there were filled and I decided to keep going and stay in a rest area somewhere. As it turned out, it never shut down again all the way to FT. Myers. I did talk to another mobile tech in Perry, Fl. who said he suspected that after filling the tank I should have burped the system by releasing the cap for possible air in the system. From Indy down absolutely no problems.  Any thoughts or suggestions?

Bud Kamnikar

Monaco Dip 40 DST

 

 

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Any codes available through the dash display? Fuel starvation should set low fuel pressure alarm. Sticking EGR valve could probably cause a low speed stall. I assume he made sure both fuel filters were completely full? Ours is hopeless at priming the primary filter on its own. Also check the fuel/water separator for leaks/cracks. I replaced mine with a solid metal Baldwin filter and forewent the water sensor when mine broke.

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Mine use to do the same thing, when it shuts down in the shifter pad still lit up?

Took it to Cummins Care in Columbia MO. they replaced the  CAPS”Cummins Accumulator Pump” , it ran great for some time but started doing the same thing  again. Took it to another shop and they replaced the crankshaft positioning sensor and the camshaft positioning sensor. Cummins said if you replace one u must replace both. 
it has ran great since with  problems. 
$1500 CAPS

$500 position sensors parts and labor. 
it should b throwing a code. 

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Bud I had this problem. My vent hose from the fuel tank was plugged with a dirt dauber creating a vacuum in the fuel tank. It would idle and drive a short way before dying. Mine had 3 hoses coming from the tank, 1 to generator, 1 to engine and the middle one was a vent. I had to pull the hose and blow out the junk with a compressor. If I didn't have a compressor I would disconnect the vent hose until I finished my trip.

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Thanks for your input. The coach is now in Fl., parked and will be there thru March. I may talk to Cummins or I may just wait for my return to Mi. in April. What bugs me is I shut down 6 times in the first 150 miles, then it ran flawlessly for the next 1150 miles.

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I can't find any mention of the year of your coach, but assuming it is an 8.3 mechanical engine, there is a fuel shutoff solenoid that is known to commonly fail.  Costs less than $100 and is easily replaced.  There is NOT a fuel shutoff solenoid on the electronically controlled engines (ISC, ISL and newer).  Not sure, but I don't think there were any significant number of mechanically controlled engines (if any) in Monaco coaches 2000 and later.

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I don't know what your problem is but find it interesting that as you moved further south into warmer temps it quit shutting down. Logic says look at something that might be affected by ambient temperature. The fuel shut off Van mentions could be affected by the ambient temperature.

 

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If it is a clogged vent, it will be worse when the tank is full.
Less airspace in the tank will result in a vacuum being pulled more quickly.
As the fuel level drops, and there is a larger reservoir of air in the tank it will take a larger volume of fuel drawn down to create the same vacuum.

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15 minutes ago, Bob Nodine said:

I don't know what your problem is but find it interesting that as you moved further south into warmer temps it quit shutting down. Logic says look at something that might be affected by ambient temperature. The fuel shut off Van mentions could be affected by the ambient temperature.

 

Van raises a good question. Need to determine if you have the ECM or the Mechanical. My best guess would be, if you have the ECM, a bad connection. However, if it started up and ran, then that could be a bugger to find. If there is a faulty connection, just barely touching, and then it starts, but when you drive, it vibrates, that would be the issue. Then, as the engine developed more heat, the connection got hotter and the faulty connection was making enough contact to run.

My advice would be to take it to a Cummins shop and have them run the codes. If it shut down, it DID throw a communication or a failure code. This "Hunt and Peck" by techs without any in-field diagnostics sometimes results in parts being replaced that are not the real issues. 

Know you are in Ft. Meyers, but I can tell you that the Cummin's dealer in Orlando has some great troubleshooting techs. They replaced a fried ECM in a 2008 Navigator. No small task as Monaco had programmed the ECM to communicate and control the Tranny, Exhaust Brake, Cruise, etc. Frank McElroy found a file with a 2008 Navigator program and emailed it to me. I worked with the Tech as well as Frank talking to him and he got my friend's MH running and all the functions and programming codes and such work perfectly. That is no small task, so I would trust them to analyze.

If you plan to drive it much, I would let them look at it and read the codes and then figure out what the issues were.

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Thanks, hadn't thought about the codes, think I will take to Cummins and have them look at it. As for dash warnings, nothing appeared to tell me anything. As for the overflow tank sensor and a possible air in the system problem, do you dismiss that?

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It likely is not the problem, but if your rear run box is designed with all the red (and other color) circuit status leds, when it shuts down and you coast to the side of the road, leave the ignition switch on and immediately look at those leds.  If by chance you have a marginal relay, the box may be all or partially dark.  If so, try tapping the PCB mounted relays involved with ignition or engine run or transmission to see if a bad wiper contact and the vibration makes contact again. Might also check the FRB if it has similar led indicators.

I mention this as although I have a Cat C13 and newer coach, I had a problem for two years where I would I would lose power for a couple of seconds or totally quit and end up coasting to the side of the road.  Simply cycling the ignition switch one to three times and it would start right back up.  Might go 5 miles or 1000 miles between failures.  Techs could never find it. No codes as to the ECM it looked like the key was just turned off.  I finally found it in the middle of a small road in northern Quebec as I just pulled out of CG and died with no speed to coast to the side, and the ignition switch cycling didn't work that time, but a tap on the right relay and the box lit up like a Christmas tree again, so off I went. Couple hundred miles later I was in a big enough town to get a pigtail for a socket (and soldering iron) to temporarily wire in a standard relay to bypass (actually in parallel) with the bad relay on that board... and used that for a few thousand miles till I got home to solder in a new PCB mounted relay that I could only find online (for about a buck or two ... cheap enough just impossible to find on the road). (BTW, I now carry a solder iron and another one of those relays and temporary pigtail as my coach has them all over the place on many circuit boards... It would have been nice if all those boards used sockets and standard automotive relays, but they didn't.)

Anyway, your problem is likely something totally different, but just a thought to look at. Sorry for the long story.

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If you take your rig to Cummins to have the codes read have them download the programming of the ECM onto a CD & paper copy.  If something does happen to your ECM the record can be used to program a new new one. 

As previously mentioned, Cummins should be able to download the codes which should help lead you in the right direction to fix your problem. 

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X250000!

Most folks don't know that it is just as simple as replacing your ($2500) ECM with a "remanufactured" (used) ECM.  Each ECM is programmed with the specifics of its application.  Never pay for a replacement ECM without getting a copy of the programming specific to your coach.

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