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Abs light


David RUSSELL
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In your manual should be a reference to location of ABS diagnostics button to activate and retrieve a blink code. Without that, it is impossible to know what's going on. You might inspect the wheel sensor wires visually but that's about all until you get the code(s).

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Over the years I've had several ABS light issues.  This last year the ABS light stayed on the whole time.  I went to retrieve the ABS codes and the button did not seem engage properly and I couldn't pull the codes.  This had happen before so I pulled the whole diagnostic board off and put on a workbench.  In the past I could used compressed air and blow the button while I press it and that would solve my problem.  Well not this time.  Pulled the board off again and this time I pulled the face of the button off, underneath there is a small spring plate with 4 legs that actually make contact with the board and initiate the diagnostic sequence.  I took the spring plate and slightly bent the 4 legs to elevate it off the board more.  That solved my problem. 

BTW, the diagnostic board is not available anymore.  A couple places, like NW RV Supply, offer a rebuild option but if they can't fix your board you are up a creek without a paddle. 

 

Also, on mine the instructions say to press the button for less then two seconds.  I learned the hard way when I screwed up and held the button in too long and it went into Dyno mode.  Took me a while to figure out what was wrong and how to get it back out.  So follow the instructions closely.

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Dyno mode is used when they test the engine's performance.  The Dyno mode actually disables the ATC but it does end up throwing a ABS blink code.   If you read the literature it should come out of dyno mode when you start it after the test.  But on mine the ABS stayed on and I got the blink code for the Dyno mode, 17-8 showing the ATC was disabled and it would not go out.  I finally found an old procedure, my wife had to help, she stayed in the drivers set to cycle the key and press the brake as I pressed the button on the diagnostic board.  I can't remember the specific sequence but it took 2 people. 

It solved my problem and since then I've been careful not to hold down the button more then 2 seconds to get the blink codes. 

 

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In my past life I had experience with doing Dyno tests on rebuilt engines.  Back in the early 80's when I worked in underground mining I had several engines rebuilt that did not perform when installed in a piece of equipment.  We usually kept several engines as spares and would change them out as needed.  So a rebuilt engine may not be used immediately but when you did install it you expected it to run.  If it didn't perform well and had to be pulled and sent off again you may end up with a piece of equipment down for extended period of time, loss of production and butt chewings from my boss drove me to do something.  So when we sent an engine in for rebuild I stipulated that the company contact me and I'd go watch it run on the Dyno.  Basically the engine was put on a stand with a large hydraulic pump mounted.  The engine would be brought up to temps and they could test out put by restricting the pump, putting heavier loads on it.  During the test oil pressure, temps, torque and other criteria could be monitored.  When the Dyno was completed I'd sign off on the engine and it would be delivered to the mines.  Initially I'd watch every engine run but over time I'd randomly observe a Dyno run but the companies never knew when I'd show up so they made sure to do a good job on the rebuild.  I'd always get a copy of the Dyno run report for the records.  Doing this improved engine rebuilds and performance.

I did a search and found this site that will actually do a Dyno test on a OTR truck.

https://www.pacificpowergroup.com/blog/our-dyno-test-erases-worries-about-your-on-highway-engines-performance

This might be something to consider if I were buying a newer coach, especially if there were any doubts.  It would check engine, transmission, drive train. 

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Mine is not labeled was not listed on the parts page for the front drivers side electrical bay, but it is mounted on the left side toward the bottom.  Here is a picture of it on the NW RV Supply site.  Note that this is for repair.  The part is obsolete.

http://www.nwrvsupply.com/product/16614041.html

Looking at the picture the black button is in the top left corner with the small orange LED light to the right of it about center along the top.

Edited by jacwjames
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  • 1 month later...

On my 96 Dynasty, the ABS light would come on periodically for no apparent reason. There is a small sensor attached to the wheel which controls that function. Sometimes they get dirty or one of the wires is compromised. I've also had it activated when going too fast over a speed bump. It would reset itself once I got back on the road and exceeded, IIRC, about 30mph. I had no button/switch....Dennis

Edited by Dennis H
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