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Termites


FWGERHART

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I was just told by my Terminix service guy, who services my coach for roaches etc, that I have termites in the coach. He then showed me where he saw some infestation. I was given an estimate of $7000 to tent and fumigate. Not in my budget. Has anyone had a termite issue in the coach and if so, how was it addressed?

Fred / 2005 Monaco Knight / 2001 Jeep Wrangler

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Yikes, never heard of that.   Termites need access to ground, unless you are parked a long time I would think this wouldn't be possible (but I'm not an expert)

When I built out new house my wife did NOT want any type of termite treatment since she has dogs etc.  Normally when building a house in East TN they would dig a foundation and then come in and completely saturate the area with strong chemicals and then pour the concrete, then as follow up they come back and treat the perimeter of the house with strong chemicals, then follow up with bait traps etc. 

I started to look for options and found this  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JJJ81SG/ref=olp_aod_redir_impl1?_encoding=UTF8&aod=1&qid=1595346399&sr=8-1

  • Disodium Octaborate Tetrahydrate (Borate) 40%
  • How Bora Care Works Boracare contains an inorganic borate salt, soluble in water, with insecticidal

This is approved to use on HUD houses, pretty much inert, once it is sprayed on to structures/wood termites won't touch it. 

So I used this extensively when building the house, Sprayed it on the foundation, block walls (before water proofing was done), and where wood would touch the walls.   Did this as the framing crew was putting the sill plates down and onto the stud walls and exterior sheeting lower ~2 ft.  Ended up using ~8 gallons, much more then recommended but a lot cheaper then traditional termite treatment. 

This comes in a thick liquid that you mix and spray.  It will leave a white residue on what every you spray it on, but you could spray it under cabinets, between walls, etc.  

 

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Hi Fred,

$7k! Wow! Is there even that much wood to eat in an RV? I think I would try applying a product like this first: https://www.amazon.com/Terro-Carpenter-Termite-Killer-Orange/dp/B07D6WVZ9W/ref=sr_1_7?crid=2YIX9OIH07PBR&dchild=1&keywords=termite+killer&qid=1630586610&sprefix=termite+%2Caps%2C184&sr=8-7

Also, don't termites burrow their way into your home via sand tunnels? Are you seeing such tunnels running up your tires? I would think that moving your RV would disrupt the colony. I would at least hit the sand tunnels with that poison and anywhere else I can see the little buggers.

Good luck!

Don

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The termites are definitely there. Little white wormy bugs. I saw them on the outside of the underside of the large living room slide. Terminix has treated the area. We live full time in the coach in a wooded RV community. The coach seldom moves. My significant other is an elementary school teacher. I have monthly Terminix service because we are permanent/stationary. Not fun I know. Regardless, my concern is termites in the walls, floors, etc. We have no idea how long this has been a problem. 

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There was a lady RVer on here quite a while back, living in Louisiana as I recall,  and she reported termites too.   Don't recall what she did.

It does seem that treating the ground around the tires would put a stop to them.

 

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We’re on Hilton Head Island. Very woody. Damp. But I get it. Never considered termites need s a connection to the earth. Can’t fly etc. So stopping them shouldn’t be a problem. My concern is the ones alive in the coach now. And I saw them. Did this just start? I don’t know. Or have they been here a while. We saw the mud like tubes (for lack of a better word) about 6” long on the underside of the slide hanging down from the outside corner. 

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Break up the tubes and spray them with a good termiticide. 

I buy it at the DIY Pest Store and mix it in a 2 gallon garden sprayer.  Also spray anything the touches the ground such as tires, mud flap, and jacks. 

Then spray inside anywhere you think they may be hiding.  

Wait 1 week and spray again.  

When you block the return path to the ground nest they will die quickly.  

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1 hour ago, FWGERHART said:

We’re on Hilton Head Island. Very woody. Damp. But I get it. Never considered termites need s a connection to the earth. Can’t fly etc. So stopping them shouldn’t be a problem. My concern is the ones alive in the coach now. And I saw them. Did this just start? I don’t know. Or have they been here a while. We saw the mud like tubes (for lack of a better word) about 6” long on the underside of the slide hanging down from the outside corner. 

Is So. California they have termites that swam/fly.

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I knew there were flying termites in California where they tent an entire house to fumigate them.  Perhaps they figure there is no other good way to treat a motorhome for subterranean.  Subterranean termites are common throughout the South and they start out needing ground contact but can live in a log or a house for a long time without ground contact.  I have seen subterranean termites living in a log that has not had ground contact for a year.  Fipronil is what I  use to treat them  which comes in many brand termiticides.  Permethrin is also used and I cannot think of a good way to treat a motorhome with either one.

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Yes termites swarm, to set up new colonies, many insects do.

There are two general types of termites: subterranean and drywood termites.                                                                                                            Subterranean termites are found in both the soil around your home and the wood of your home. 

Drywood termites thrive solely in wood and are found mostly in warm, coastal regions - primarily California, Texas, Louisiana, Florida, andGeorgia.                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Subterranean termites can be found anywhere in the states.

 

Edited by Ray Davis
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