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Where is it hanging out?


96 EVO
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De-winterized a month ago, have ran about 100gal thru the fresh water system including staying in the coach for 3 days. After returning home, I drained the water system due to a few cold nights in the forecast.

Today I loaded half a tank of fresh water, and got a blast of plumbing antifreeze out of each tap 🤔!

Stuff is hiding somewhere in the system. I even made 3 pots of coffee from the tank water while away, and never seen / tasted no antifreeze!

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Nope, no accumulator.

One thing I was thinking, I didn't bother running fresh water thru the washing machine before my short dry camping trip. 

Wonder if the antifreeze from that line could have bled back into the system when I opened the low point drains?

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I have a similar issue. After flushing I still end up getting foamy water out of different faucets at different time sporadically.  Painful. I’m going to try blowing it out this year. The other benefit is that I can use the antifreeze again. 

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58 minutes ago, Chargerman said:

I have a similar issue. After flushing I still end up getting foamy water out of different faucets at different time sporadically.  Painful. I’m going to try blowing it out this year. The other benefit is that I can use the antifreeze again. 

Well, I hate to say it, but I'm glad I'm not alone 😄!

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1 minute ago, 96 EVO said:

Well, I hate to say it, but I'm glad I'm not alone 😄!

My guess is that the antifreeze gets trapped in the manifold block. I seem to go halfway through the season and can still turn on a faucet and get the foam for about a half gallon. Grrr

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I live in southeastern NC.  I keep my coach at home under a shed with electrical power.  Our winters consist of quite a few low 20's nights and even a few in the teens.  I winterized one coach and vowed never to do that again. I actually drink water from my tank, and it seems that RV antifreeze leaves a taster that lingers forever. 

I use a collection of porcelain-based light bulb sockets fastened to small wooden squares.  In each socket is one of the two-bulb converters, so each socket has two incandescent bulbs (in case one burns out).  I place these light bulb assemblies in the wet bay, storage bay, under the sinks, and in the shower.  Most importantly, each of these light bulbs is controlled by the "barn thermostat" below that is non-adjustable, and set for ON at 35*, OFF at 45*

AmazonSmile: Farm Innovators TC-3 Cold Weather Thermo Cube Thermostatically Controlled Outlet - On at 35-Degrees/Off at 45-Degrees : Tools & Home Improvement

My coach is always plugged in, and I've found the combination of light bulbs and a coach furnace thermostat (propane furnace) set at 40* have proven adequate.  I've done this for 10 years now without a problem.  I do have remote reading thermometers in each critical location.  And I did add a drain for my icemaker line.

This might not work in bitterly cold climates, and surely not if you do not have power to your coach while it is stored.

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Van, I'm with you on doing anything not to winterize my coach.  For 30 years of owning gassers, every year I winterized with propylene glycol. 

When we bought our Dynasty in 2007, the top priority was to build an insulated pole barn on the property.  The 24x60 foot pole barn has about 1" spray foam insulation on the exterior metal walls +6" fiberglass insulation.  The roof is conventional shingles with 12" fiberglass insulation in the ceiling.  The floor is 8" thick concrete.  The 14x14 foot garage door is insulated.  The interior is all sheetrocked with 100 amp electric service.

Up in central NJ near the PA line it can get pretty cold.  We have gone through multiple days at a time with highs below freezing and lows below zero.  I do keep a close eye on the temperature in the barn but even though I could run the aquahot on 50 amp electric I've yet to use that option.  I do recall temps in the barn getting down to as low as 34 over the past 15 years but not lower.

Yes, living up north and not needing to winterize sure is great!

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