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Clear Coat Blisters on Roof 2004 Windsor


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I have 5 locations of clear coat blistering on my roof on the painted sections. The white fibreglass in the centre location is fine except for some mould spots.

Has anyone found a satisfactory repair to the blistering. In one or two locations it is getting close to the side where it would be visible.

What works well in removing the mould spots on the white fibreglass sections.

Thanks

Doug

image.thumb.jpeg.d526b9d4527a26d9e0b2699d341ba1d9.jpeg

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, gimesun said:

I have 5 locations of clear coat blistering on my roof on the painted sections. The white fibreglass in the centre location is fine except for some mould spots.

Has anyone found a satisfactory repair to the blistering. In one or two locations it is getting close to the side where it would be visible.

What works well in removing the mould spots on the white fibreglass sections.

Thanks

Doug

image.thumb.jpeg.d526b9d4527a26d9e0b2699d341ba1d9.jpeg

Following: I had a quote to repair mine, $4500. Strip and recoat . Spot repair is only temporary. The other sections will blister next. YouTube has videos for cars repair. Yours looks great compared to mine.

Edited by Gary M
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Yep repaint. If you have a spot for a “Hard” tape line, you could find cheaper, but the the cap usually runs down all the way to the belt. So pretty much a full paint job on the caps. 

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I don’t know who’s coach this is but it’s an option to paint it white above the beltline.2ACD6CC6-88DF-4851-A7B3-4615D2210812.thumb.jpeg.9430c08c267234d4242768d6463add16.jpeg

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I had a more severe but similar situation on our 2005 Safari Cheetah. After several inquiries resulted in prices well out of our reach I did the following: using 220 grit paper on my 5" RO pad sander I took down the clear coat and some spots through the paint as well. I masked off to a sharp line at the belt line and where the cap meets the roof tape. I cleaned the entire sanded surface with acetone followed by soapy water and then after rinse an air dry I went over it with alcohol. After air drying again I sprayed with rustled in a color that was almost a dead match for the coach color. Next day light sand with 320 grit and clean with alcohol. Dry and spray again in opposite direction. Next day 600 wet sand, clean, dry and spray clear coat. Did this for 3 coats. Do not use polyurethane to clear coat as it will yellow in time.

While the job would probably have better result in a paint booth the job is not noticeable different from the rest of the coach and cost less than $100.

YMMV

 

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1 hour ago, Gary M said:

I don’t know who’s coach this is but it’s an option to paint it white above the beltline.2ACD6CC6-88DF-4851-A7B3-4615D2210812.thumb.jpeg.9430c08c267234d4242768d6463add16.jpeg

Exactly! If you can hard line an edge. Great way to do it with a different color 

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The "blistering" is the Clear Coat coming off. I had the entire roof of the Windsor painted with Rubberized Tuff Coat to cover up the missing clear coat and to eliminate the white streaking coming from the unpainted fiberglass roof.

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21 hours ago, Dr4Film said:

The "blistering" is the Clear Coat coming off. I had the entire roof of the Windsor painted with Rubberized Tuff Coat to cover up the missing clear coat and to eliminate the white streaking coming from the unpainted fiberglass roof.

Did you just paint over the old cancerous looking clear coat mess and seal it in or did you need to sand it all down first? 

 

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2 hours ago, Grampy OG said:

Did you just paint over the old cancerous looking clear coat mess and seal it in or did you need to sand it all down first? 

 

The process required the smooth surfaces to be roughen up somewhat before the two-part primer was laid down. So, everything was sanded except for the two long strips that run from the front to the rear that were rough in texture already. Then one coat of the primer was laid down followed with three coats of the Rubberized Tuff Coat Paint.

It has been on the roof for over 10 years now and there are some small areas where the texture is starting to peel. The new owner plans to touch it up I believe.

Ultra-TUFF Coat-07.JPG

Ultra-TUFF Coat-12.JPG

Ultra-TUFF Coat-25.JPG

Ultra-TUFF Coat-28.JPG

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2 hours ago, Dr4Film said:

The process required the smooth surfaces to be roughen up somewhat before the two-part primer was laid down. So, everything was sanded except for the two long strips that run from the front to the rear that were rough in texture already. Then one coat of the primer was laid down followed with three coats of the Rubberized Tuff Coat Paint.

It has been on the roof for over 10 years now and there are some small areas where the texture is starting to peel. The new owner plans to touch it up I believe.

Ultra-TUFF Coat-07.JPG

Ultra-TUFF Coat-12.JPG

Ultra-TUFF Coat-25.JPG

Ultra-TUFF Coat-28.JPG

Wow that is great. Did you do it yourself?

I went to the website and it said could be rolled or sprayed. I would imagine for a do-it-yourselfer roller would be easier. 

My top looks every bit as rough but 5k or more is not in the cards. 

Ken

 

 

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Grampy OG, Dr4film and I used too different approaches to address the same issue (see above posts). Both are cost effective options especially if you can do the work yourself. Dr4Film's approach is especially good if you are looking to recoat your entire roof anyway. My approach was used as a stop gap measur as I will probably not redo the roof until next year. BOTH approaches require proper perpetration of the surface to be refinished. This includes sanding until the surface is smooth without any signs of pealing and then cleaning the surface before treating.

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Sand, Prime, Paint, Clear. ie: Refinish.

Only real way to fix the "clear coat lifting".

The lions share of the work is the sanding.  The paint is a few hours.

The experience is in the painting.

so, rent yourself an air compressor and use a "DA" sander with 220 then 400 dry paper over all the lifted spots and bring it down to the primer.

Then maybe a buddy or auto body paint shop will give you a labor reduced rate.

The paint materials is expensive.

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