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Slide undercarriage damage


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Hi Monacoers,

 

I noticed some damage today and wanted this forums opinion on cause and how to go about fixing. I don’t think there is a leak but perhaps the slide extended when we weren’t level enough. Here’s a pic: as always I very much appreciate the folks here that have helped me in the past and will pay it forward.

A885EB48-FA72-4D38-B5F0-4FFED07A65AB.jpeg

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29 minutes ago, BlueCastleRV said:

Hi Monacoers,

 

I noticed some damage today and wanted this forums opinion on cause and how to go about fixing. I don’t think there is a leak but perhaps the slide extended when we weren’t level enough. Here’s a pic: as always I very much appreciate the folks here that have helped me in the past and will pay it forward.

A885EB48-FA72-4D38-B5F0-4FFED07A65AB.jpeg

Sorry for being a little dense, but exactly WHICH side or corner is the damage.  The guardian plates are for the underside of the slide.  The are pieces of SS plate that are custom bent (think angle iron).  The typically go on each corner and fix the bad edges.  They extend maybe 2 inches up on each side.  The lower or under side is wide enough to go under the bottom corner rollers.  I have installed 3 sets of them.  However, they can also be installed as a flat plate if you have middle rollers.

Get us a better pictures and describe which slide and which side or corners 

Thanks

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1 hour ago, BlueCastleRV said:

It’s the front left drivers slide, corner closest to the drivers seat. Almost looks like it flexed when leveling and dug into the slide. More pics:

 

image.jpg

image.jpg

OK....you are a candidate for Chris Throgmartin's Guardian Plates. 

http://talinman.com/guardianplates/

If you google Guardian Plates you will get a lot of hits. There is a video. I have, as I said, installed three sets.  That was a pair on the Main Front large Slide (which I think is your issue) and the Rear Bedroom (electric motor one) and the other Rear Slide - the short or the wardrobe slide....so I am not a professional installer....but I have had my fun at cutting out the fiberglass and then lifting or jacking up the slides, fitting them, predrilling and god only knows what....and mine work great.  I did have an issue on the rear wardrobe where there are 4 or so plastic rollers and not two big rollers. The interior crown molding did not have sufficient clearance and the slide was in a bind and eventually frayed a cable. My FAULT for not checking. But it is fixed. The ones like you have or will need will go onto the main rollers.

They work great.  If you have the Drop Down slide, which I THINK you may, then you will need to get Chris some precise measurements. That's it.

This is the ONLY way to fix them. He provides good instructions. I can PM or talk to your offline if you need help or his techs will do that.

Good Luck. Chris is one of our good guys....

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13 hours ago, Tom Cherry said:

OK....you are a candidate for Chris Throgmartin's Guardian Plates. 

http://talinman.com/guardianplates/

If you google Guardian Plates you will get a lot of hits. There is a video. I have, as I said, installed three sets.  That was a pair on the Main Front large Slide (which I think is your issue) and the Rear Bedroom (electric motor one) and the other Rear Slide - the short or the wardrobe slide....so I am not a professional installer....but I have had my fun at cutting out the fiberglass and then lifting or jacking up the slides, fitting them, predrilling and god only knows what....and mine work great.  I did have an issue on the rear wardrobe where there are 4 or so plastic rollers and not two big rollers. The interior crown molding did not have sufficient clearance and the slide was in a bind and eventually frayed a cable. My FAULT for not checking. But it is fixed. The ones like you have or will need will go onto the main rollers.

They work great.  If you have the Drop Down slide, which I THINK you may, then you will need to get Chris some precise measurements. That's it.

This is the ONLY way to fix them. He provides good instructions. I can PM or talk to your offline if you need help or his techs will do that.

Good Luck. Chris is one of our good guys....

Tom,

I very much appreciate the advice. I’ve checked out the guardian plates and thought I could avoid as none of the beads have been broken on the slides but we’re out in South Carolina for the summer and the rain, humidity is quite a bit heavier than San Diego where I purchased the coach. 
 

I’ll get the measurements together and order them from Talin. Once again, thank you for taking the time. I’ll follow up with a post after installation or if my YouTube mechanic skills start to fail me.

 

Happy 4th everyone!

Mike, Erin and Ava

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If your rig is like mine it may have rollers mounted to the side of the coach that support the slide,.  From the pictures It almost looks like some this cutting into the bottom of the slide, I would check the roller and make sure there isn't a problem.  Something's going on there.

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48 minutes ago, BlueCastleRV said:

Tom,

I very much appreciate the advice. I’ve checked out the guardian plates and thought I could avoid as none of the beads have been broken on the slides but we’re out in South Carolina for the summer and the rain, humidity is quite a bit heavier than San Diego where I purchased the coach. 
 

I’ll get the measurements together and order them from Talin. Once again, thank you for taking the time. I’ll follow up with a post after installation or if my YouTube mechanic skills start to fail me.

 

Happy 4th everyone!

Mike, Erin and Ava

Make sure you have a LOT of photos and measurements on the size of the damage and such. Chris has them made up custom. I have not seen your type of damage....but he probably has.  Mine was where the bottom underlayment had deteriorated. That bottom underlayment is a sandwich "board". The bottom piece is a thin, maybe 3/16", piece of "laminate" or think plywood. There is a thin, very thin....plastic layer or laminate coating on the bottom. Then the floor is actually made up of "studs" or probably, more correctly, perlines. These pieces are spaced out in the floor (the floor of the slide). Think a maze or perhaps mortar joints. The number and pattern vary based on the design and the stuff to be supported or attached (sofas and seatbelts). Then there is a top layer or the floor that you see...which is typically covered by carpet. 

The three pieces . Underlayment, Perlines or inner support and the top layer are vacuum filled with foam and the whole affair is a sandwich.

Sometimes there will be damage to the underlayment. I HAD THAT. Hit a bump or maybe curbed a tire with the slide RETRACTED. Somehow that bounce "broke" or fractured the bottom underlayment. Then after repeated use, the indent or the recess grew. It finally stabilized. I drilled and explored, with Chris' input and another Ex Monaco "supervisor" in Elkhart. Their conclusion. Structurally, the floor was FINE. BUT, repeated cycling of the slide would only worsen the recess or the shallow area in the underlayment. I designed, with Chris' help a floor plate with also a turned up edge....ala the Guardian Plate.  I then installed it so that the total underlayment ran on the Guardian plate....thus, my two rollers on the rear bed slide worked or run on the SS plates. They are GLUED IN...I also learned a LOT about sealants and expansion of joints being glued. I did all the prep work and I ordered, just to be safe in the future and also have the slide level, the OTHER Guardian plate....it was the measurement for my rollers and their proximity to the side or the corner.  SO....did all the dirty work with a grinder and sand paper and dremel tool.  Body puttied the indent so that it was smooth and level. Then glued and pop riveted the plates in place. The slide was jacked up 3/4" using TWO T Post jacks. After Installation of both plates, I carefully lowered the jacks and then repositioned them UNDER the plates. Then jacked them up maybe 1/4" just to get the plates off the rollers (you have to jack up the slide so you can slide the plates INSIDE and UNDER the rollers...so that the rollers always run ON the plates.  I left the jacks in place for 24 hours. The glue or sealant will "expand"....ever so slightly....but if you leave it in a compressed state....it cures and you have the PERFECT bond. Loctite tech support told me this.

Bottom line....that fixed that one. The front slide, similar to you, started to abrade and wear and streak on the underlayment. My sides are fiberglass and I did not see any damage....which is the weak area that gets water and breaks.  Chris designed the plates to fix this.

Your's looks a little different....so Chris needs to consult.  He has probably seen worse. He will give you guidance as to whether to do anything on the other side. Typically, you do NOT. I started to dig into the deep recess on my bed slide and the advice was...LEAVE IT ALONE....

Have fun. It is not that bad of a job. When a 74 YO man and a non handy 73 YO woman can do it and it turns out great....it ain't rocket science...

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28 minutes ago, Tom Cherry said:

Make sure you have a LOT of photos and measurements on the size of the damage and such. Chris has them made up custom. I have not seen your type of damage....but he probably has.  Mine was where the bottom underlayment had deteriorated. That bottom underlayment is a sandwich "board". The bottom piece is a thin, maybe 3/16", piece of "laminate" or think plywood. There is a thin, very thin....plastic layer or laminate coating on the bottom. Then the floor is actually made up of "studs" or probably, more correctly, perlines. These pieces are spaced out in the floor (the floor of the slide). Think a maze or perhaps mortar joints. The number and pattern vary based on the design and the stuff to be supported or attached (sofas and seatbelts). Then there is a top layer or the floor that you see...which is typically covered by carpet. 

The three pieces . Underlayment, Perlines or inner support and the top layer are vacuum filled with foam and the whole affair is a sandwich.

Sometimes there will be damage to the underlayment. I HAD THAT. Hit a bump or maybe curbed a tire with the slide RETRACTED. Somehow that bounce "broke" or fractured the bottom underlayment. Then after repeated use, the indent or the recess grew. It finally stabilized. I drilled and explored, with Chris' input and another Ex Monaco "supervisor" in Elkhart. Their conclusion. Structurally, the floor was FINE. BUT, repeated cycling of the slide would only worsen the recess or the shallow area in the underlayment. I designed, with Chris' help a floor plate with also a turned up edge....ala the Guardian Plate.  I then installed it so that the total underlayment ran on the Guardian plate....thus, my two rollers on the rear bed slide worked or run on the SS plates. They are GLUED IN...I also learned a LOT about sealants and expansion of joints being glued. I did all the prep work and I ordered, just to be safe in the future and also have the slide level, the OTHER Guardian plate....it was the measurement for my rollers and their proximity to the side or the corner.  SO....did all the dirty work with a grinder and sand paper and dremel tool.  Body puttied the indent so that it was smooth and level. Then glued and pop riveted the plates in place. The slide was jacked up 3/4" using TWO T Post jacks. After Installation of both plates, I carefully lowered the jacks and then repositioned them UNDER the plates. Then jacked them up maybe 1/4" just to get the plates off the rollers (you have to jack up the slide so you can slide the plates INSIDE and UNDER the rollers...so that the rollers always run ON the plates.  I left the jacks in place for 24 hours. The glue or sealant will "expand"....ever so slightly....but if you leave it in a compressed state....it cures and you have the PERFECT bond. Loctite tech support told me this.

Bottom line....that fixed that one. The front slide, similar to you, started to abrade and wear and streak on the underlayment. My sides are fiberglass and I did not see any damage....which is the weak area that gets water and breaks.  Chris designed the plates to fix this.

Your's looks a little different....so Chris needs to consult.  He has probably seen worse. He will give you guidance as to whether to do anything on the other side. Typically, you do NOT. I started to dig into the deep recess on my bed slide and the advice was...LEAVE IT ALONE....

Have fun. It is not that bad of a job. When a 74 YO man and a non handy 73 YO woman can do it and it turns out great....it ain't rocket science...

Thanks for the advice and your experience. I’ll reach out to Chris (I assume he’s at Talin Manufacturing?). I have the measurement sheets but I’ll send over some pictures to get his advice. 
 

Happy 4th to you and the Wife!

 

Mike

 

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3 hours ago, jacwjames said:

If your rig is like mine it may have rollers mounted to the side of the coach that support the slide,.  From the pictures It almost looks like some this cutting into the bottom of the slide, I would check the roller and make sure there isn't a problem.  Something's going on there.

Yeah,  I would pull down on the bottom wiper seal in hopes you can see the roller.  Hopefully it's ok, but the damage looks suspect to me.  Mine had a track, so to speak worn or rolled on the bottom but not ripped like yours.  Could something have gotten under the slide causing damage?  Someone a while back had flooring installed then started having issues with the slide.  When they looked past that bottom wiper seal there was flooring scraps left by the installers.

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9 hours ago, Tom Cherry said:

Make sure you have a LOT of photos and measurements on the size of the damage and such. Chris has them made up custom. I have not seen your type of damage....but he probably has.  Mine was where the bottom underlayment had deteriorated. That bottom underlayment is a sandwich "board". The bottom piece is a thin, maybe 3/16", piece of "laminate" or think plywood. There is a thin, very thin....plastic layer or laminate coating on the bottom. Then the floor is actually made up of "studs" or probably, more correctly, perlines. These pieces are spaced out in the floor (the floor of the slide). Think a maze or perhaps mortar joints. The number and pattern vary based on the design and the stuff to be supported or attached (sofas and seatbelts). Then there is a top layer or the floor that you see...which is typically covered by carpet. 

The three pieces . Underlayment, Perlines or inner support and the top layer are vacuum filled with foam and the whole affair is a sandwich.

Sometimes there will be damage to the underlayment. I HAD THAT. Hit a bump or maybe curbed a tire with the slide RETRACTED. Somehow that bounce "broke" or fractured the bottom underlayment. Then after repeated use, the indent or the recess grew. It finally stabilized. I drilled and explored, with Chris' input and another Ex Monaco "supervisor" in Elkhart. Their conclusion. Structurally, the floor was FINE. BUT, repeated cycling of the slide would only worsen the recess or the shallow area in the underlayment. I designed, with Chris' help a floor plate with also a turned up edge....ala the Guardian Plate.  I then installed it so that the total underlayment ran on the Guardian plate....thus, my two rollers on the rear bed slide worked or run on the SS plates. They are GLUED IN...I also learned a LOT about sealants and expansion of joints being glued. I did all the prep work and I ordered, just to be safe in the future and also have the slide level, the OTHER Guardian plate....it was the measurement for my rollers and their proximity to the side or the corner.  SO....did all the dirty work with a grinder and sand paper and dremel tool.  Body puttied the indent so that it was smooth and level. Then glued and pop riveted the plates in place. The slide was jacked up 3/4" using TWO T Post jacks. After Installation of both plates, I carefully lowered the jacks and then repositioned them UNDER the plates. Then jacked them up maybe 1/4" just to get the plates off the rollers (you have to jack up the slide so you can slide the plates INSIDE and UNDER the rollers...so that the rollers always run ON the plates.  I left the jacks in place for 24 hours. The glue or sealant will "expand"....ever so slightly....but if you leave it in a compressed state....it cures and you have the PERFECT bond. Loctite tech support told me this.

Bottom line....that fixed that one. The front slide, similar to you, started to abrade and wear and streak on the underlayment. My sides are fiberglass and I did not see any damage....which is the weak area that gets water and breaks.  Chris designed the plates to fix this.

Your's looks a little different....so Chris needs to consult.  He has probably seen worse. He will give you guidance as to whether to do anything on the other side. Typically, you do NOT. I started to dig into the deep recess on my bed slide and the advice was...LEAVE IT ALONE....

Have fun. It is not that bad of a job. When a 74 YO man and a non handy 73 YO woman can do it and it turns out great....it ain't rocket science...

I have a feeling 1 of 2 things happened. Either something got under the slide (not unthinkable we have a year old) or I extended the slide when the coach was too far out of level. Either way I can’t find the the culprit if something is underneath by the roller. I think the guardian plates are in order after patching the laminate. Seems like cheap insurance against floor rot.

 

Mike

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43 minutes ago, BlueCastleRV said:

I have a feeling 1 of 2 things happened. Either something got under the slide (not unthinkable we have a year old) or I extended the slide when the coach was too far out of level. Either way I can’t find the the culprit if something is underneath by the roller. I think the guardian plates are in order after patching the laminate. Seems like cheap insurance against floor rot.

 

Mike

Comments from one that has done a few...but Chris rules. I'd go ahead and make up my T jacks. Take three  2X4 and figure out the length based on the jacks you use. Bottle Jacks with a screw adjustment on the top is great. Then laminate the posts with deck screws. Cut a 30" or so, maybe shorter based on the length of the slide....I would cut it about 6" shorter than where the skirt or seal is to the edge of the aluminum frame underneath. Screw that to the top of the post. Don't go crazy and do a 2 X 8 and then add side braces....  2 or 3 men, if a full size living slide, can lift and move a slide.

You can then use 2 T posts and  jack up each side.....maybe 1/8" each side. 3/4" will be a gracious plenty. Get a high powered LED and pull back the skirt and spin and examine the roller. Hopefully it is FINE....just the usual wear. Lubricate it and make sure it is free. Do BOTH sides of course.

OK....patching the thin bottom of the slide. FORGET IT. there is nothing to patch to as it foam on the other side....if like mine. Chris will supply the adhesive and also a caulking sealer. You want to make sure (Dry Fit) that the plate fits. If it is the drop down, he will cut it exactly. I did have to use a side grinder with a small, thin cutoff wheel and do a little notching and fitting. Once you get it dry fitted, then you can mark the area to be covered with a Sharpie. You want to use very thin beads of the adhesive (3M) and then spread it out. It is NOT necessary to have it 100% coated. Put a little adhesive on the tears splits of the bottom. Then spread out with a putty knife. You want a thin layer over the loose pieces and about an inch beyond. One you put the plate in place and seat it and then put the third one. That will hold the plate in place....and you drill your holes and put in the Pop Rivets. I ordered a 13" Heavy Duty tool from Amazon. Chris uses a pneumatic tool. You will tear up a pliers type of Pop Riveter as these are 3/16" SS and they require a bit of force....but the HOLD.  After pop riveting, you can let down the slide and let the side compress the adhesive. I used a T post to push up the center of each plate to keep the adhesive from expanding.

Just a matter of taking your time. The side prep is the worst...and Chris knows how to tell you how to do that. I came up with a way that works for me....much easier than grinding it all out...

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11 hours ago, Tom Cherry said:

Comments from one that has done a few...but Chris rules. I'd go ahead and make up my T jacks. Take three  2X4 and figure out the length based on the jacks you use. Bottle Jacks with a screw adjustment on the top is great. Then laminate the posts with deck screws. Cut a 30" or so, maybe shorter based on the length of the slide....I would cut it about 6" shorter than where the skirt or seal is to the edge of the aluminum frame underneath. Screw that to the top of the post. Don't go crazy and do a 2 X 8 and then add side braces....  2 or 3 men, if a full size living slide, can lift and move a slide.

You can then use 2 T posts and  jack up each side.....maybe 1/8" each side. 3/4" will be a gracious plenty. Get a high powered LED and pull back the skirt and spin and examine the roller. Hopefully it is FINE....just the usual wear. Lubricate it and make sure it is free. Do BOTH sides of course.

OK....patching the thin bottom of the slide. FORGET IT. there is nothing to patch to as it foam on the other side....if like mine. Chris will supply the adhesive and also a caulking sealer. You want to make sure (Dry Fit) that the plate fits. If it is the drop down, he will cut it exactly. I did have to use a side grinder with a small, thin cutoff wheel and do a little notching and fitting. Once you get it dry fitted, then you can mark the area to be covered with a Sharpie. You want to use very thin beads of the adhesive (3M) and then spread it out. It is NOT necessary to have it 100% coated. Put a little adhesive on the tears splits of the bottom. Then spread out with a putty knife. You want a thin layer over the loose pieces and about an inch beyond. One you put the plate in place and seat it and then put the third one. That will hold the plate in place....and you drill your holes and put in the Pop Rivets. I ordered a 13" Heavy Duty tool from Amazon. Chris uses a pneumatic tool. You will tear up a pliers type of Pop Riveter as these are 3/16" SS and they require a bit of force....but the HOLD.  After pop riveting, you can let down the slide and let the side compress the adhesive. I used a T post to push up the center of each plate to keep the adhesive from expanding.

Just a matter of taking your time. The side prep is the worst...and Chris knows how to tell you how to do that. I came up with a way that works for me....much easier than grinding it all out...

 

Let me ask, in case of over analysis leads to paralysis on my end, any recommendations for service centers around the Charlotte, NC area? We’re currently staying with friends (traveling for the summer)and while I can acquire the tools, jacks, rivet gun, I can see the benefit of going with experienced installers.

Let me know if any recommendations as a backup.

 

 Thanks!

 

Mike 

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56 minutes ago, BlueCastleRV said:

 

Let me ask, in case of over analysis leads to paralysis on my end, any recommendations for service centers around the Charlotte, NC area? We’re currently staying with friends (traveling for the summer)and while I can acquire the tools, jacks, rivet gun, I can see the benefit of going with experienced installers.

Let me know if any recommendations as a backup.

 

 Thanks!

 

Mike 

When you purchase the plates from Talin, they supply the drill bit, stainless steel rivets, and adhesive/sealant.  The rivet gun is an up charge -$25 I think.  You will need it, as it’s heavy duty and necessary for installing the stainless steel rivets.  
I think the price of a small jack, drill and some wood will be significantly less than having a shop do the installation.  Plus, you’ll have the benefit of knowing it was done right.

 

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1 hour ago, BlueCastleRV said:

Let me know if any recommendations as a backup.

Installing Guardian plates while traveling is not somteing I would want to do either.   I might try this though, measure the length needed to cover the damaged area.      Go to Lowes or Home Depot & buy a door kick plate for a temporary repair

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3 hours ago, BlueCastleRV said:

 

Let me ask, in case of over analysis leads to paralysis on my end, any recommendations for service centers around the Charlotte, NC area? We’re currently staying with friends (traveling for the summer)and while I can acquire the tools, jacks, rivet gun, I can see the benefit of going with experienced installers.

Let me know if any recommendations as a backup.

 

 Thanks!

 

Mike 

I’m in Raleigh.  The only folks that I would trust to do it is the Tom Johnson CW stores in Marion and Concord (Charlotte Motor Speedway) and CW IN Colfax  (Greensboro) and my guy locally.  This is not a complicated task if one can do home repairs.  

Labor intensive.  Chris has folks that can do it….but they have been doing it.  Ask him the cost of the plates and what his techs would charge.  Then I would ask him his shop rate.  Add in say 30% for a shop that has never done it or only done one pair.  His site has the tools required.  I don’t know, since it has been 4 years since I did my last row slides what he is including in the kit.  My estimate, since I work slow and meticulous and “ANAL” is NOW....working with confidence on the third set....

1 Hr.  Mobilize and get all stuff you need and build the T posts.

3 Hr. Jack up, Disassemble the rain deflectors (Don’t think you have them…), cut/grind the outer frame and dry fit the plates  Note. I figured out how to speed up the frame removal by cutting with a putty knife and hammer and then touch up with grinder and did a long slide in under an hour.  Shared it with Chris. 

2 Hr. Apply adhesive. Install plates. Move T Post to hold in place. Drill holes.  Pop rivet. Clean off and excess adhesive (tough stuff…Acetone required….might try masking with blue tape.  You do one side and clean it.  Then the next.

1 Hr. Finish cleaning and apply caulk and reinstall rain guards.  I reversed mine as they now cover and work better with the plates installed.  Common sense.

Figure 8 hours.  Chris may be less...probably is...but unless you hit a great tech and they have only done one...it will be closer to my 8.

NOTE.  I left my plates and slide jacked up 24 hours to keep the adhesive from expanding.  Probably overkill, but if I used too much, the joint stayed flat.  I used Loctite PL rather than the 3M. But the potential for joint expansion is there for both and the Loctite tech support knew exactly how I was using it and the size of the plates.  He said it was critical due to size and that over use could slightly warp the plates.

Do the math.  I had my wife help me, mostly in the install and moving the T post.  She cleaned up.  

Tools.  Drill and grinder. Might need a thin cutoff blade as no matter how precise, there may be a little notching or fitting.  Lowes would cut the wood.  Rest is small stuff.  It CAN be done while in a CG or such...you just need the bottle Jacks. You could left one side and shim and hold it in place...just don't like to do that.  Then do the other side.  Lift it barely enough to get the plate under the slide and moved inside.

I looked at your pictures.  Someone tried, I think, to fix the leak….if that is a bead of caulk above the metal frame that is on the vertical side of the slide.  You grind off that entire vertical section of the frame.  I pried mine loose or cut a piece out….the put in a special putty knife and used a hammer and cot it off at the corner or where it turns or is bent under.  I started in the middle and went both ways.  Then ground as a touch up.  The entire aluminum piece on the vertical side comes off.  You put the SS PLATE on and it is GLUED in place.  Never leak again.

My approach, assuming you could do this repair yourself when not traveling and don’t want to spend big bucks or trust it to a tech that has never done it….WAIT.

Do the inspection without jacking up the slide.  If the roller is OK….GET a roll of Gorilla tape, color to your liking.  Seal the upper edge or the top of the frame to sidewall.  Then use the real original Gorilla tape and put a patch over the whole area with the splits.  Drive it and fix when you can nor consider going to Chris’s place.

It ain’t that hard.  Assuming you have the skill set.  It is a very specialized, or not that common of a fix, but it works.

PS....Lost all the photos on my phone of the finished work on all three slides. BUT, here is a photo of the first slide where I had the indent...it was proabably 1/2" at one point. I used a hole saw and explored as I was gonna "FIX" it right...and fill and such. OPPS.  Ain't no way to fix the splits and such except to put on the plates. I think that mine is a bit thicker than yours. I glued back in the plug I cut out and then Bondoed and Leveled it and covered it up...

 

 

1 hour ago, Ray Davis said:

Installing Guardian plates while traveling is not somteing I would want to do either.   I might try this though, measure the length needed to cover the damaged area.      Go to Lowes or Home Depot & buy a door kick plate for a temporary repair

I thought of that….but the side or frame needs to be sealed with Gorilla tape temporarily.  I think a Gorilla tape double thick patch on the underside will last long enough to drive back to California.  He has a leak, if I interpret the pictures that someone tried to fix with white caulk,  Seal both sides on the vertical side with Gorilla tape to prevent further damage, then install the plates and it is better than new.

Slide Underside Damage and Cross Section.jpg

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40 minutes ago, Tom Cherry said:

I thought of that….but the side or frame needs to be sealed with Gorilla tape temporarily.  I think a Gorilla tape double thick patch on the underside will last long enough to drive back to California.  He has a leak, if I interpret the pictures that someone tried to fix with white caulk,  Seal both sides on the vertical side with Gorilla tape to prevent further damage, then install the plates and it is better than new.

IMHO what ever ripped the bottom probably probably won't have trouble ripping the gorilla tape either,  but it might be worth a try.

 

2 hours ago, BlueCastleRV said:

 We’re currently staying with friends (traveling for the summer)

I took this comment to imply they are not heading home soon. So the kick plate would provide some insurance against further damage.  Gorilla tape is great to use to temporarily seal areas that might be leaking.   It grips well but still can be pulled off where Eterna bond and such sticks way to good, it's nearly impossible to remove.

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49 minutes ago, Ray Davis said:

IMHO what ever ripped the bottom probably probably won't have trouble ripping the gorilla tape either,  but it might be worth a try.

 

I took this comment to imply they are not heading home soon. So the kick plate would provide some insurance against further damage.  Gorilla tape is great to use to temporarily seal areas that might be leaking.   It grips well but still can be pulled off where Eterna bond and such sticks way to good, it's nearly impossible to remove.

We actually agree.  As to your first comment about "whatever ripped it...".  I THINK, based on my slide issue in the bedroom, that water got in and then the slide sort of settled. The water damage is, HOPEFULLY, on that lower panel. Once it is stopped, then it should be OK.  When my bedroom slide bounced and came back down hard on the roller, it was a small dent. THEN, as time went on, the strain on that lower panel started to stress it and it propogated a line crack or a split....same as Mike's. The more you used it....the longer it got.  If I am correct that it was water and there is NO structural or roller interference....then, Mike would be good to go with the Guardian plate. 

The Gorilla Tape will seal the vertical sides. BUT...EternaBond (been there) is a PITA to remove. He would run the risk of damaging the paint above where the Guardian plates would go or cover.  I drove 2400 miles with a shattered side glass and 2 or 3 thicknesses of Gorilla Tape holding it together....it will last if he goes back home to California. 

I agree that a thin kick plate would be a temporary fix. BUT, it needs to be put on TEMPORARILY and not slide or cause roller damage. That means it has to go UNDER the slide and on top of the roller. The slide has to be jacked up....otherwise you run the risk of the plate damaging the roller and that exacerbates the issue. SO...  that is REALLY not an option. 

Jack up the slide. Find a plate that will work. Put it in. OPPS...it is NOT attached, unless you glue it to the underside....and THAT is an issue. When you install the Guardian plates, you put adhesive on the front area, past where the roller stops so it bonds to the bottom. I did mine a little heavy and I could use a screwdriver to clean it up from the inside...and it squishes out...when you lower the slide. The kick plate was meant to be a permanent fix and needs to be glued in....then you have to pull it out and NOT damage the underside. My slide had rivets and a plastic glide plate from Monaco and those had to be cut off....from the outside....with the jacks up...to get the area clean....a BIG PITA.

So, my opinion....stay away from the kick plates as a temporary fix as you might do more harm that good...unless the kick plates are installed and resting on the rollers and extend an inch or so out, then running UP and OVER the roller could damage the roller.  Two thicknesses of Original Gorilla Tape, as far in as he can get it, will keep the underlayment from splitting any further. If the Gorilla tape DID not hold up, then He MIGHT have to use EternaBond Tape...but I think it will last until he gets home... We BOTH agree that the pieces of the board need to be "patched" to prevent them from tearing up. The issue with the EternaBond would be getting it back off without tearing off the underlayment....

Mike, if you are not familiar with EternalBond, it is the heavier, thicker tape used to seal the TOP of the slide to the front edge of the slide. Look at yours. When folks put on new awning or slide toppers, they USUALLY peel off this tape.  There is a special solvent and you have to use a putty knife...  Chris will have to chime in...but if the plate,  practically speaking, WILL cover the existing split.  I blew up the photo and the roller, assuming it near the side will easily cover the long split and the pieces will be glued or adhered to the underside.  

Ray, Just my thoughts....and we each have our own level or comfort or how we would do things, initially.......and as I read and listen to others, mine often changes.... If the split is strictly water damage to the underlayment....and then the stress and cracking and propogation thereof....then stopping the stress with two thicknesses of Gorilla Tape and/or reinforcing it maybe once on his way back should work. I think, and it is MY assumption and opinion, that two thicknesses of Gorilla tape will NOT damage the roller. It will hold the underside together....and prevent more splitting.

Chris will have to weigh in. He has the most knowledge....and can also "predict" things. If he says....FIX IT NOW... then SO BE IT.  Now, the other OPTION....Put in that slide and don't extend it until you get home or until you get to a shop that knows how to install Chris' plates.  A little draconian....but you might save some $$ and also prevent further damage. Slide issues are nothing to underestimate.

I put in a set of plates on a plastic roller slide. Never THOUGHT there would be any issues. Ordinarily there aren't. This was the wardrobe slide...Monaco never intended for the slide to go higher than how they set it. There is a piece of crown molding or plate on the slide. When the slide goes in, this wooden trim goes UNDER the wooden frame of the wall. OPPS, Monaco did not allow sufficient clearance.  The dealer had to take it down and cut off a a smidge on a table saw. He left a small gap....that was OK. BUT, it was too narrow for the thickness and adhesive of the Guardian plates....from the middle to the right side. There was a MOAN and an occasional POP.  I had cycled the slide and we packed for a 3 month trip.  Driveway is sloping....wrote off the noise to the leveling issue.  NOPE.  IN AR, I investigated. Spent half a day with the tools and I had removing wood....and waxing the two mating surfaces. OK....later on, I was doing an inspection and found that the lower cable on the right side...behind the slide flange, was frayed. The fraying probably happened with it was in the original strain...  Had to have the whole wall removed and the shop (the only ONE tech I trust in the CW Colfax store) replaced the cable and also recut the crown molding to work. Mine was an ODD BALL.  Mike, typically, there is scads of room or play on the big slides and you have an adjustment on the roller height....  My plastic rollers were fixed....  I would NOT worry about moving the slide up, vertically, a fraction of an inch....even with the thickness of the adhesive.

Just my ramblings.....

 

)

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5 hours ago, Tom Cherry said:

We actually agree.  As to your first comment about "whatever ripped it...".  I THINK, based on my slide issue in the bedroom, that water got in and then the slide sort of settled. The water damage is, HOPEFULLY, on that lower panel. Once it is stopped, then it should be OK.  When my bedroom slide bounced and came back down hard on the roller, it was a small dent. THEN, as time went on, the strain on that lower panel started to stress it and it propogated a line crack or a split....same as Mike's. The more you used it....the longer it got.  If I am correct that it was water and there is NO structural or roller interference....then, Mike would be good to go with the Guardian plate. 

The Gorilla Tape will seal the vertical sides. BUT...EternaBond (been there) is a PITA to remove. He would run the risk of damaging the paint above where the Guardian plates would go or cover.  I drove 2400 miles with a shattered side glass and 2 or 3 thicknesses of Gorilla Tape holding it together....it will last if he goes back home to California. 

I agree that a thin kick plate would be a temporary fix. BUT, it needs to be put on TEMPORARILY and not slide or cause roller damage. That means it has to go UNDER the slide and on top of the roller. The slide has to be jacked up....otherwise you run the risk of the plate damaging the roller and that exacerbates the issue. SO...  that is REALLY not an option. 

Jack up the slide. Find a plate that will work. Put it in. OPPS...it is NOT attached, unless you glue it to the underside....and THAT is an issue. When you install the Guardian plates, you put adhesive on the front area, past where the roller stops so it bonds to the bottom. I did mine a little heavy and I could use a screwdriver to clean it up from the inside...and it squishes out...when you lower the slide. The kick plate was meant to be a permanent fix and needs to be glued in....then you have to pull it out and NOT damage the underside. My slide had rivets and a plastic glide plate from Monaco and those had to be cut off....from the outside....with the jacks up...to get the area clean....a BIG PITA.

So, my opinion....stay away from the kick plates as a temporary fix as you might do more harm that good...unless the kick plates are installed and resting on the rollers and extend an inch or so out, then running UP and OVER the roller could damage the roller.  Two thicknesses of Original Gorilla Tape, as far in as he can get it, will keep the underlayment from splitting any further. If the Gorilla tape DID not hold up, then He MIGHT have to use EternaBond Tape...but I think it will last until he gets home... We BOTH agree that the pieces of the board need to be "patched" to prevent them from tearing up. The issue with the EternaBond would be getting it back off without tearing off the underlayment....

Mike, if you are not familiar with EternalBond, it is the heavier, thicker tape used to seal the TOP of the slide to the front edge of the slide. Look at yours. When folks put on new awning or slide toppers, they USUALLY peel off this tape.  There is a special solvent and you have to use a putty knife...  Chris will have to chime in...but if the plate,  practically speaking, WILL cover the existing split.  I blew up the photo and the roller, assuming it near the side will easily cover the long split and the pieces will be glued or adhered to the underside.  

Ray, Just my thoughts....and we each have our own level or comfort or how we would do things, initially.......and as I read and listen to others, mine often changes.... If the split is strictly water damage to the underlayment....and then the stress and cracking and propogation thereof....then stopping the stress with two thicknesses of Gorilla Tape and/or reinforcing it maybe once on his way back should work. I think, and it is MY assumption and opinion, that two thicknesses of Gorilla tape will NOT damage the roller. It will hold the underside together....and prevent more splitting.

Chris will have to weigh in. He has the most knowledge....and can also "predict" things. If he says....FIX IT NOW... then SO BE IT.  Now, the other OPTION....Put in that slide and don't extend it until you get home or until you get to a shop that knows how to install Chris' plates.  A little draconian....but you might save some $$ and also prevent further damage. Slide issues are nothing to underestimate.

I put in a set of plates on a plastic roller slide. Never THOUGHT there would be any issues. Ordinarily there aren't. This was the wardrobe slide...Monaco never intended for the slide to go higher than how they set it. There is a piece of crown molding or plate on the slide. When the slide goes in, this wooden trim goes UNDER the wooden frame of the wall. OPPS, Monaco did not allow sufficient clearance.  The dealer had to take it down and cut off a a smidge on a table saw. He left a small gap....that was OK. BUT, it was too narrow for the thickness and adhesive of the Guardian plates....from the middle to the right side. There was a MOAN and an occasional POP.  I had cycled the slide and we packed for a 3 month trip.  Driveway is sloping....wrote off the noise to the leveling issue.  NOPE.  IN AR, I investigated. Spent half a day with the tools and I had removing wood....and waxing the two mating surfaces. OK....later on, I was doing an inspection and found that the lower cable on the right side...behind the slide flange, was frayed. The fraying probably happened with it was in the original strain...  Had to have the whole wall removed and the shop (the only ONE tech I trust in the CW Colfax store) replaced the cable and also recut the crown molding to work. Mine was an ODD BALL.  Mike, typically, there is scads of room or play on the big slides and you have an adjustment on the roller height....  My plastic rollers were fixed....  I would NOT worry about moving the slide up, vertically, a fraction of an inch....even with the thickness of the adhesive.

Just my ramblings.....

 

)

Good news is I’m here just south of Charlotte until early November and have time to do it right and not under duress. I’m definitely going to tape it temporarily until I get a hold of Chris, ensure my slide outs are measured correctly and have removed whatever could have created the damage (if it was something my toddler hid for dadda😐 lol). There’s a lot of info above that I’m grateful for. I think I can do the work I f I take my time and follow the directions from Talin and heed the good advice here.  I’ve watched their videos and have the measurement sheets. These are great rigs and I don’t mind getting it squared away before any real damage occurs. I’ll keep everyone posted as I get the plates ordered and acquire the tools. Happy Independence Day! 

 

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1 hour ago, BlueCastleRV said:

Good news is I’m here just south of Charlotte until early November and have time to do it right and not under duress. I’m definitely going to tape it temporarily until I get a hold of Chris, ensure my slide outs are measured correctly and have removed whatever could have created the damage (if it was something my toddler hid for dadda😐 lol). There’s a lot of info above that I’m grateful for. I think I can do the work I f I take my time and follow the directions from Talin and heed the good advice here.  I’ve watched their videos and have the measurement sheets. These are great rigs and I don’t mind getting it squared away before any real damage occurs. I’ll keep everyone posted as I get the plates ordered and acquire the tools. Happy Independence Day! 

 

Look up my contact info. I will walk you through what I DID and my tips.  When I get my MH out of the shop (balky step cover), I will take some pictures and send you. It turned out so neat that my wife said that it was one of my OUTDID YOURSELF projects...

Good DEAL...

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Michael,  If you are familiar with IRV2 forum there are some very talented guys over there.  Some of them are on here too.  Anyway, one guy there is especially good.        The one I'm refering to is Mike aka zmotorsports.  Mike does lots of projects and he is meticulious and thorough plus he videos and photographs as he does them.            Here is a thread that is very similar to your issue.

https://www.irv2.com/forums/f115/repair-damaged-covering-under-slide-463534.html

Mike can also be found on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeODCfhiKZk

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Hi Mike:

I am a little late on this topic and for that I apologize. I looked over your pictures carefully and can tell you that the good news is you have no rot - yet. Unfortunately you will need Guardian Plates to correct the problem.

So you can better understand the problem and so others can maybe learn as well let me explain - your floor is called a flush floor. In other words it runs on an internal glide bar. There are no rollers. I have seen this type of damage hundreds of times and it is normally caused by a loosening of the laminate on the edges. One has to remember that on a flush floor the vast amount of weight and forces are applied at the edges of the slide during operation. This is why some Monaco's have a glide bar in addition to what are called corner blocks. These blocks are thick and stout and are 5 to 6 inches wide and are mounted to the floor of the bus at the corners.

The fix is an easy one - install Guardian Plates. Luckily you caught it early. I have seen it where the laminate has ripped inward by 24 inches and at that point the fix requires custom made plates ( much wider ) which are a PITA to install. My advice is to use a razor knife and trim the loose laminate off. Do NOT use glue or tape or you will create an absolute mess. Remember the bottom of the floor rides on a plastic glide bar and whatever you apply to the laminate will get wiped off the very first time you run the slide in and will get stuck on the glide bar creating a hell of a mess. Trust me when I say owners who applied tape, adhesive or whatever to the damaged areas of laminate on a flush floor slide have cost themselves a lot of extra time, money and headaches. It all gets ate up by the glide bar. If your coach is sitting in our service lot you are going to be paying one of my techs a lot of labor time to clean the gunk from that glide bar completely before installing guardian plates. I have done numerous slides like that and it takes time and effort because the glide bar is NOT in an easily accessed area. Never apply anything like tape or adhesive to the bottom of a flush floor slide.

Give my VP, Bethany, a call on Wednesday ( I closed the office and shop on Tuesday so my staff could have a long holiday weekend ). Her number is 352-942-2653. She knows the Guardian Plate system inside and out. Make sure you tell her I have already assisted you here on the forum. She can get your plates into production and ready for shipment. If you have any other questions let her or myself know. We can also assist you via phone and facettme during the installation process in the event you run into a problem. I also encourage you to watch my buddy Mike Z's youtube install videos. He made those for me and does a great job explaining the install procedures.

Just to make you feel better, here are some photos of slides I myself have plated. Obviously the owner never seen the damage as few owners ever inspect and look for this under their slides. I was able to fix all of them with the Guardian Plate system.

 

FG Torn Lam Right Opened Up.JPG

MIller BR Slide 2.JPG

FG Missing Lam left.JPG

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Chris,  Man that's a great explanation.   Thank you.    Those pictures are ugly,  they show the great need for Guardian Plates and that folks need to take a look under there now and then before things get that bad.

I though about that Mike ( OP ) might have glide bars instead of roller but since I didn't know what his coach might have decided to not bring it up.  I am so glad you did and that really clears the picture of how this damage starts and progresses.  Haven't I read of those glides sometimes breaking up?  Could that be an issue here?

With him being in place until Nov and having your guidance I know he can do it

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53 minutes ago, Ray Davis said:

Haven't I read of those glides sometimes breaking up?  Could that be an issue here?

With him being in place until Nov and having your guidance I know he can do it

Rarely do I encounter a broken glide bar. I have only seen 2 in my career. Typically it is the plastic glide plates that the factory installed on the bottom edges of the slide that break apart. I always remove them and replace them with Guardian Plates. We have to remember that structurally, the flush floor is the weakest slide we have on Monacos'. There are no cross support braces under the floor and no frame on the inside edge. When I invented the Guardian Plate system I made sure the plate was wide enough to lock the sidewalls and floor together to provide a beefed up support system for the slide itself while also eliminating future rot.

Glide Plate Broken.JPG

HDGO7690.JPG

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