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Bio diesel fuel


Scott 61

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When I fill up my motorhome I usually try and find biodiesel 5% ULSD

I noticed most of the truck stops are selling 20% ULS biodiesel

Can someone explain what the difference is between ULSD & ULS

I have ran 20% ULS and it seems like I lost power & fuel mileage

Thank you

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ULSD=Ultra low suffer diesel 

LSD-low sulfer diesel

The % is how much bio is blended into the fuel.  BIO does not have the same energy as petroleum.  You will have less power and worse fuel mileage.  BIO is a great fuel system cleaner.  When Bio started showing up at the pumps- many fuel take liners started to fail.  The bio blend would seperate the entire liner from the steel tanks. BIO also has a chance of growing mold if it is left to sit (time and heat will determine when mold will start)  Mold in the fuel system is a pain to deal with-not as bad a algea though.  

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I would not run bio-diesel in my tractor unless it was specifically designed for that fuel mix.  Never in an expensive DP.  Even though some of you are running without DEF, I like being able to breath in the barn with the engine running (door open of course).

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I was talking to a guy at the tire shop, he had a Cummins company decal on the truck he was waiting for and a Cummins tag sewed to his shirt. I have a cummins in my ram and also the monaco.

He told me he worked mainly on generators and most of his work came on state owned equipment because they ran biodiesel. He said to avoid it a all costs.

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I haven't seen straight on road diesel in years. All of the local pumps ( South Carolina) are at least 5% and most trucks stops are 15-20%.  I travel all over the east coast and south west as far as Texas.  Is straight on road diesel still available any where?

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1 hour ago, Walker said:

I haven't seen straight on road diesel in years. All of the local pumps ( South Carolina) are at least 5% and most trucks stops are 15-20%.  I travel all over the east coast and south west as far as Texas.  Is straight on road diesel still available any where?

 

  I would love to burn straight pure diesel but as Matt said how can you guys find the stuff?   Maybe I could search around locally and find it but on      the road how do you look for straight or low bio diesel?

  More and more stations around here are selling ethanol free gasoline, it's expensive, but supposed to be better for mowers etc.

Edited by Ray Davis
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Several years ago I was advised by a Cummins Distributor at Monaco Intl Rally that pre-2003 engines should not be run on Bio.  Our rig is 2000 so am always looking for Diesel #2 signs at stops. That said I live in CA and all Diesel in CA has minimum of 4.7% Bio by state mandate. So I run the Cummins recommended additive from Power Service called Diesel Kleen. Bottle to treat 250 gallons about $17.00 and change at WalMart.

Was told by Flying J manager that the 20% Bio sticker is on pump as a warning that pump can contain up to20%. He indicated he has no idea what the actual level of Bio is in pumps just that it will not exceed 20%.

Pat C
2000 Monaco ISC 315

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30 minutes ago, Ray Davis said:

 

      Maybe I could search around locally and find it but on   

   

Ha, I've tried that in my town and they look at me like I have two heads!

"It get's delivered in a big truck", is all they know :classic_blink:!

  • Haha 1
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I generally find by using the smart phone app or web site called Gas Buddy. I have found most station clerks don't know that's why I'll try and find manager. In CA their will be a sticker on pump saying Diesel #2 or Bio-Diesel and a percentage.

Pat C

 

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I try to run straight diesel whenever I can.  I can get it locally and whenever I’m planning a trip I look at the Love’s and TA/Petro website.  It lists the truck stops and whether they are straight diesel or the blend of biodiesel.  I know they update the info because I’ve seen locations where the blend has changed.  
               
I’ve run 20 percent when it was the only choice.  Didn’t have any problems.  I bought some of the DieselKleen and Howe’s additives and put them in whenever I refuel (if I remember).  I’ve talked to fellow RVers and truckers and most say they don’t worry about whether they run biodiesel or straight diesel.  I wonder how much power/performance/fuel mileage is lost with biodiesel?
 

Dan D                         
2012 Diplomat 43DFT 

 

 

 

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Dan,

The newer Cummins like yours do not seem to have the issues that pre-2002 engines have with Bio. By time your engine was built engine manufacturers pretty much knew what they were dealing with for fuel and tried to compensate. My 2000 ISC runs very rough off Bio. Most truckers you are talking to have newer engines I'll bet. 

Had a '67 Mustang GTA with the 390ci engine. Our local race engine really did not want to rebuild that engine in the 90's. In his opinion too much change in CA gas and the 390 did not modify well to run the later era fuel.

Pat
2000 Diplomat

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When we went on our first real trip last summer I tried to find #2 every time on advice from a buddy who owns a trucking company. Unfortunately #2 is harder to find in different places in the country than it is in Oregon. After putting on over 1,500 miles and running 3 tanks of bio during this time my fuel lift pump started dumping fuel one morning in Montana on start up.  Had it replaced, gasket was leaking.  Was this because of the bio, who knows.  Maybe the previous owner hadn't run much lately but I know bio reacts differently in hoses and gaskets.  My guess was it was the bio.  

I have a 2003 ford diesel pickup and have seen similar things as people describe above.  Plugged filters from it cleaning the tank, loss of mileage etc.  Older engines it can ruin fuel lines as well.

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Chad,

Interesting comments. I have read several places that Lift Pumps tend to fail about 100K. Mine started leaking about 102K and engine was miserable to start. Interesting engine ran better at 6K elevation. Guess Lift Pump was not keeping up with fuel demand. I sometimes stop needing only 1/2 a tank just to buy #2.

Enjoy your travels.

Pat

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