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RV Propane Gas Detector Issue


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Hello all,

EDIT: OK dummy (me), read the directions. It says right on it that the symptom I have is "end of life" and it says to replace every 5 years. I'll leave this up in case anyone else has the same thing happen.

When we took off in our RV last week, the first thing that happened was the Safe-T-Alert 40-442-P Propane Gas Detector started beeping. The light will flash two times red, then two times green, then when it starts two times red again it starts beeping.

The LP tank is turned off, and just to be sure we opened all the windows and aired out the coach. I also drove it 30 minutes after this with all the A/C units running, and it still beeped.

Since our coach is a 2005, and the date on this detector is October 2012, I'm guessing it is fairly common for these to go out and need replacing? Is that the case? If so, I'll just order a new one.

Thanks!

Rob and Amy Harper

2005 Safari Gazelle 40PBT

Edited by Rob and Amy Harper
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Yeah, when I actually LOOKED at it and saw the codes right on the front, I saw that too. $52 at Amazon, it'll be here tomorrow.

When it started, we were running really late and I had to set camp in the dark. I was so tired of hearing it beep I simply disconnected it and threw it to the side. Today when I was posting this, I saw the front and noticed it was telling me end of life. I kind of felt like a dummy but figured I'd leave the post up in case someone else had the same error.

Thanks all and safe travels!

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Guest Tim503

Is this the unit under the fridge? Just unhook it from electric. Unless you think you will be so out of it you will allow propane to leak into your coach. A carbon monoxide detector is important but I haven't had mine hooked up for years. I ended up putting in another vent for the furnace to get more hot air on the floor.

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Wow. “A carbon monoxide detector is important but I haven’t had mine hooked up in years”. I think you are making a big mistake. Please hook it back up. If it’s location is a problem then install it elsewhere but don’t go without. 

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Mine went off at 2 AM last summer in my 2012 Diplomat.  Needless to say it scared the you know what out of me.  I jumped up and assumed it was the smoke alarm, but it wasn’t.  The noise was ear piercing loud and I could not find where it was coming from. I was scrambling all over the kitchen area and could not find the source.  Once I  moved to the table area, I could see the flashing LEDs.  The alarm is mounted under the kick panel by the cabinets and is not readily visible.  I was able to reset it and then did research and discovered it was indeed the end of life notification.

 

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comment from experience....as well as reading other's comments.  FIRST....replace LIKE KIND with LIKE KIND.  Mine has a CO Detector in the CEILING of the Bedroom.  I have a Propane Detector underneath the Stove.  Both are HARD WIRED.  I have a battery powered Smoke Detector in the kitchen/living area.  That is ALL OEM.  I have replaced all of them.

With the hard wired units, YES...Amazon is the source.  The vendor even tells you that.  What I found out was that trying to get to the plug (and yours may be different) is a PITA.  The techs just cut the leads near the openings.  YES...they look and see and reach back and if the plug is inaccessible or would be an issue.....leave that alone.

Use a Crimping Tool (ratcheting from Amazon) and then use two Butt Splice connectors.  The ratcheting butt splice crimping tool give you a mechanical and vibration resistance joint.  YES....some will use wire nuts.  NOT CODE nor recommended.  YES....some will twist and solder.  Again, NOT code and not recommended.  IF you really 'want to solder", then you put on the wire nuts....twise and get the leads twisted or intertwined.  Remove the Wire Nuts....solder to your heart's content.  THEN replace with the Wire Nuts.  

The Butt Splice Connectors are approved and reliable and also will not be subject to the MH's vibration.

Just a comment and also some advice....

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Guest Tim503
On 6/12/2020 at 6:40 AM, Chargerman said:

Wow. “A carbon monoxide detector is important but I haven’t had mine hooked up in years”. I think you are making a big mistake. Please hook it back up. If it’s location is a problem then install it elsewhere but don’t go without. 

Just so you understand as the post is maybe confusing. I have a carbon monoxide detector but I don't have a propane detector installed. The location for all detectors are important. For example you don't install a carbon monoxide or smoke detector near the floor. Propane is heavier than air. Keep this in mind that a propane detector will not tell you if you have a leak in the refrigerator cabinet as it is sealed from the interior of the motorhome. That is why they say it is best to turn the gas off when traveling, Most problems are in the refrigerator cabinet. The propane detector can tell you if you turn on the stove and then walk away forgetting about it.

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On 6/12/2020 at 8:07 AM, Tim503 said:

Is this the unit under the fridge? Just unhook it from electric. Unless you think you will be so out of it you will allow propane to leak into your coach. A carbon monoxide detector is important but I haven't had mine hooked up for years. I ended up putting in another vent for the furnace to get more hot air on the floor.

This is twice you have suggested bypassing a safety feature. It is your choice and that safety feature may not be necessary but it would be wise to just keep those actions to yourself and not suggest them to others.

 

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Enough said!

Article from RVTravel.com

alberta-lp.jpg

A fifth-wheel has exploded at a remote campground in Alberta, leaving six family members with serious, but not life-threatening injuries. Last Monday rescue crews scrambled to Marten River Campground, 180 miles north of Edmonton. At first the family was sent to a local hospital, but they have since been sent for more specialized care in Edmonton. The family consists of two adults and four children, ages six to 41. Investigators said the family had a small, “single use” LP cylinder inside the rig which leaked and exploded. This sad case reinforces the call for all RVers to ensure their LP detectors are truly operational.

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16 hours ago, Tim503 said:

Just so you understand as the post is maybe confusing. I have a carbon monoxide detector but I don't have a propane detector installed. The location for all detectors are important. For example you don't install a carbon monoxide or smoke detector near the floor. Propane is heavier than air. Keep this in mind that a propane detector will not tell you if you have a leak in the refrigerator cabinet as it is sealed from the interior of the motorhome. That is why they say it is best to turn the gas off when traveling, Most problems are in the refrigerator cabinet. The propane detector can tell you if you turn on the stove and then walk away forgetting about it.

So just so I’m clear on your thought. Disconnecting a Carbon Monoxide detector is something that shouldn’t be done but doing the same to a Propane detector is ok and recommended by you?  Doesn’t make a bit of sense to me. They don’t install them for decoration. They are “required”. Please don’t continue to put yourself and your family at risk and reconnect this device ASAP and certainly don’t recommend that others disconnect theirs. 
 

thank you. 

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Both my propane and CO detectors started sounding "end of life" within a couple months of each other.  The date on the back of them was 5 years previous.  I replaced both of them and checked the date on my smoke detector to make sure of it's age.  These devices are only capable of working correctly for a limited time and when they've passed the recommended date for replacement, replace them.  I'm not willing to risk my life and the lives of those that travel me by not following safety recommendations.  It just doesn't make sense. 

Virtually every safety recommendation was established after someone lost their life.  Fire prevention week in October commemorates the Great Chicago Fire.  All of our Life Safety Codes were written after the fact - after the tragic loss of life called for something to be done.  The links below are sad reminders nothing was done beforehand to ensure minimize the loss of life.  Don't add your name to another article about the tragic loss of life.

Historic Fires that resulted in today's Life Safety Codes:
https://fireprevention.utexas.edu/firesafety/historic-fires

Quote

By learning about our nation’s history of tragic fires, you can best understand the fire safety regulations of today. These notorious fires from U.S. history taught fire protection professionals valuable lessons, and continue to shape the way we in the Fire Prevention Services office work to create a safe environment for the university community.

How 1911's Triangle Fire Changed US Safety Laws
https://edmdigest.com/featured/triangle-fire-us-safety-laws/

The worst nightclub fire in history happened in 1942 in Boston
https://www.boston.com/news/history/2015/11/28/the-worst-nightclub-fire-in-history-happened-73-years-ago-in-boston

Lessons Learned from The Beverly Hills Supper Club Fire
https://www.qrfs.com/blog/278-the-deadliest-fires-in-u-s-history-lessons-learned-from-the-beverly-hills-supper-club-fire/

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Lets get back to the facts and basics.  NOW....assuming the Monaco met the RVIA code as well as OTHER standards.

In MY MH, 2009 Camelot.  The bedroom, centered almost above the bed, is the CARBON MONOXIDE Detector.  Mine did NOT sound the END OF LIFE alarm as I checked the manufacturing date (after reading the reminders on the OLD Yahoo Site).  I replaced it with the SAME model as the OEM, except it was a Rev level or two updated.  

The Propane Detector, since Propane is HEAVIER than air, is located on the toe kick or baseboard right under the Stove or Cook Top Unit.  Again, I replaced about 6 or so months early in order to get it done before the summer camping season.

BOTH of the above are hard wired 12 VDC units.

The kitchen/Living area has a "RV RATED" Battery operated Smoke Detector.  SOME have added a second on to the bedroom area or near their Gas refrigerator.  BUT, the CODE only requires one.  I checked with the vendor and replaced it a little early.  I also replace the batteries annually....but might have missed a year once.  Again, this is RVIA code.

I posted an install tip on how to easily install the replacement....as well as to do it properly.  WIRE NUTS are not recommended due to the fact that it is NOT a crimped joint.

The other warnings about bypassing or such should be noted.  This site, as in the old Yahoo site, is trusted as the moderators, as well as the experienced members, provide factual information.  Sometimes our own "experiences" are not consistent....and we understand.  But personal and fire safety is JOB ONE and anyone that advocates defeating or disconnecting or bypassing a critical item such as the RVIA or required or OEM equipment will be noted and that fact will be corrected.

This comes from the Owners/Moderators/Administrators.....so we all abide by and all support this fundamental rule.  Please do NOT advocate any such actions with the safety equipment...

Thanks for understanding....

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Guest Tim503
On 6/15/2020 at 8:02 PM, Tom Cherry said:

Lets get back to the facts and basics.  NOW....assuming the Monaco met the RVIA code as well as OTHER standards.

In MY MH, 2009 Camelot.  The bedroom, centered almost above the bed, is the CARBON MONOXIDE Detector.  Mine did NOT sound the END OF LIFE alarm as I checked the manufacturing date (after reading the reminders on the OLD Yahoo Site).  I replaced it with the SAME model as the OEM, except it was a Rev level or two updated.  

The Propane Detector, since Propane is HEAVIER than air, is located on the toe kick or baseboard right under the Stove or Cook Top Unit.  Again, I replaced about 6 or so months early in order to get it done before the summer camping season.

BOTH of the above are hard wired 12 VDC units.

The kitchen/Living area has a "RV RATED" Battery operated Smoke Detector.  SOME have added a second on to the bedroom area or near their Gas refrigerator.  BUT, the CODE only requires one.  I checked with the vendor and replaced it a little early.  I also replace the batteries annually....but might have missed a year once.  Again, this is RVIA code.

I posted an install tip on how to easily install the replacement....as well as to do it properly.  WIRE NUTS are not recommended due to the fact that it is NOT a crimped joint.

The other warnings about bypassing or such should be noted.  This site, as in the old Yahoo site, is trusted as the moderators, as well as the experienced members, provide factual information.  Sometimes our own "experiences" are not consistent....and we understand.  But personal and fire safety is JOB ONE and anyone that advocates defeating or disconnecting or bypassing a critical item such as the RVIA or required or OEM equipment will be noted and that fact will be corrected.

This comes from the Owners/Moderators/Administrators.....so we all abide by and all support this fundamental rule.  Please do NOT advocate any such actions with the safety equipment...

Thanks for understanding....

Good grief. Anybody can install anything they want to. The RVIA code is for the manufacturers. There is no government intervention in it. The reason you have a 5 year life on the unit is to get by the warranty period and the potential liability of the manufacturer for putting in a device that doesn't have a safety shut off. Every other appliance has a safety shut off except for the stove. Before I move my motorhome I have to go around and make sure everything is in it's place. Especially the fridge door. Safety in a motorhome is a big subject. That is why I own a Monaco with a steel cage built like a tank. If I had people in my unit that I was worried about them turning on the gas and walking away then a propane detector would be smart. Living by myself I don't need it just because they installed it when it was built. Fire safety in a motorhome could include an automatic lock out of the propane system when ever the motor is started Are you saying that if that system is installed in the future that you would have the same rule? To be clear, I am not encouraging or even suggesting that people do anything. I was only giving an opinion and what I did.

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