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Appreciate the Link !

On the topic of Michelin Tires, 

I would like to share my experience on when we purchased our 2007 Signature with 32,00 miles March of this year. I didn't check the date codes on the tires until after we got it home, actually I did attempt to look but every tire on the coach the codes were facing inboard. The fifty mile drive home was a little rough. So my first trip was to Pete's Tire where it got new Michelins on the front and Toyo's on the rear.

So what, right... the tires that I drove home on were dated 2006 !! the original tires !! 

This is our 3rd coach, I know about date codes and aged out tires. As I write this I'm still beside myself on the bonehead move. If I had crawled under the coach to find the codes I would not be writing this.

If you're looking at a coach to purchase, LOOK AT THE DATE CODES !!!

 

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The 2006 dynasty we purchased last February had some DOT codes facing out and some facing in. Luckily, between the salesperson and the inspector I was able to know the age of the tires before the purchase. The steers were 2016, drives were 2015 and the tag was 2017. We drove 3000 miles from Salt Lake City back to Florida without a tire incident. I did install a Pressure Pro TPMS before leaving SLC. That helped a lot. However, I was very apprehensive about driving that distance with tires that old.

Age is not the only thing to take into consideration. Size, brand and model play a role too plus how the tires had been treated, kept inflated to proper psi, never curbed, etc.

The steers on the Dynasty were Goodyear RV G670 295/80R/22.5 (AKA Badyear Tires) and all of the rears were Goodyear Fuel Max 11R-22.5. 

Once back home I had Josam's install two Toyo 295/80R/22.5 Tires on the front with brand new Tyron Bands and Balance Masters. This coming winter I will have them install four new Toyo Tires on the drive with a set of Balance Masters. Then the following winter the 2 YO steers will go to the tag with Balance Masters and new steers will be installed on the front.

When having new tires installed, for some shops, you have to request that the tires be mounted with the DOT codes facing out. Any good shop like Josam's will always mount tires with the codes facing out. Big difference between average tires shops and ones that know how to mount tires correctly.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Ivan K said:

Some, like my remaining Michelin tires are directional so you can't always have the date code facing out...

What model Michelin tires do you have on your coach that are directional?

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9 minutes ago, 96 EVO said:

Gee, they put a lot of thought into that, with the date code facing in, with directional tires mounted properly 🙃!

Yep! That's what an "engineering" degree will get you. Lots of book-smarts with very little practical knowledge and common sense.

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1 hour ago, Dr4Film said:

Yep! That's what an "engineering" degree will get you. Lots of book-smarts with very little practical knowledge and common sense.

Hey Hey Hey,   I resemble that😄

BS in Mining, Masters in Industrial Engineering, MBA   >>>>  but I'd like to think I have some common sense.

But over the years I've met and had some really smart people who had ZERO common sense.   But they could never BS a BS'er.

  • Haha 1
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4 hours ago, Ivan K said:

X Line Energy, a little dirty being through rain and dust in Wyoming but you can see the arrow. 

IMG_20220821_091007476_HDR.jpg

Fascinating,  never seen that before.   I used to hear do not change the rotation direction of radials.

Edited by Ray Davis
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I suppose the tire shop could have mounted them with the directional arrow facing in!

It's not like you need to keep checking that to make sure it didn't change directions 😁!

Edited by 96 EVO
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I put new tires on my steer axle this spring, they are directional tires to 50% of tread life, they have direction arrows on both sides walls of the tires all the way around the tire next to the face of the tires.

I also have directional tires on the pusher axles on my work truck, there are Michelin tires, they seem to work good but they are only on the ground half the time.

 These are the tires I put on my steer axle.

https://www.michelinrvtires.com/tires/selector/#!/info/x-coach-z

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12 minutes ago, Jdw12345 said:

they are directional tires to 50% of tread life,

Humm,  after that it don't matter?

Not sure I have ever seen RV tires 50% worn out,  so maybe it doesn't matter.

Makes me sick to buy new tires, my old ones still look new.

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When I had my 6 Bridgestone tires changed last year they all looked really good but were aged out (big time).  I asked the tire vendor if I could get some credit, he said no, but I have no doubt in my mine they sold them as a used tire to truckers.   Most OTR trucks use larger tires but these could have work on a dump truck with a drop axle. 

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9 minutes ago, Paul A. said:

Sell the take off to local truckers. They use them on trailers. Or take to a truck stop. I saw on another site last week, a guy sold 8 for 200$ each. 295-80-22.5 

When I take the coach in for new tires, there isn't any room to store one tire let alone 6 or 8. Which means you would have to haul a trailer or rent a trailer to take to the shop. Or have someone follow you in a truck.

The only logical way to accomplish that task is to arrange the sale prior to the installation and have the purchaser show up on installation day to retrieve the tires.

Logistics and timing.

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Saving old tires is a hassle but some of us have pickups and or trailers so that part is not a problem.  However finding a buyer might not be so easy.  I'll tell you 6 tires is a pu full, 8 tires I can't imagine.  To be honest I could not begin to load those things anymore.   I have a tractor with a front end loader so I can us it when at home.

I think if I ever considered saving my tires again I would try to find a buyer and let them pick the tires up at the shop.

 

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I sold my tires on FB marketplace. They are now on someone's trailer and that person could not belive how nice they were. Took a couple of weeks but since I change tires myself, no logistics problems.

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58 minutes ago, Ivan K said:

I sold my tires on FB marketplace. They are now on someone's trailer and that person could not belive how nice they were. Took a couple of weeks but since I change tires myself, no logistics problems.

Bill G changed his own tires too.   My guess is that more people might try it but figure tires that big sre too big to handle.   However,  I've heard they are actually easier to mount than most smaller tires.                                             

I think you ( Ivan ) may be one of those that said they were not so bad.  How about it?                                             

Personally, I'm probably not up to it.   It's not just my tires that are aging out.  😁

 

Edited by Ray Davis
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10 minutes ago, Ray Davis said:

Bill G changed his own tires too.   My guess is that more people might try it but figure tires that big sre too big to handle.   However,  I've heard they are actually easier to mount than most smaller tires.                                             

I think you ( Ivan ) may be one of those that said they were not so bad.  How about it?                                             

Personally, I'm probably not up to it.   It's not just my tires that are aging out.  😁

 

Ray, yes they are heavy. I think the M144 is like 140 lbs alone but you don't have to lift them, just roll them and drop on the floor. With the right tool and good slime, you just remove the rim which is only about 70 lbs. There should be no fighting them, with their large circumference they should slide right out and back on. Now, if you have safety devices in them, that certainly complicates things but at least I know that it is done right. Of course there is also removing the wheel from axle and torquing it back on. I know that there will come a day when I can't do it anymore either.

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How were you able to set the bead Ivan?  I was blown away when they changed mine and used the pressurized canister that sounded like a shotgun blast when the opened the valve 😳 

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