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Roadmaster spare tire carrier


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I just got done investigating the spare tire carrier an contemplating adding it to my coach. I know i will need to find a rim, then had concidered when i replace my aged out rear tires i would have it mounted to the rim as a spare. Any ideas? Anyone have one, perhaps some pros an cons? I am reluctant to put a new tire in that position only to have it time out, does the engine heat create a problem for the tire?2C27C407-9ADE-4CCF-99E1-F4330E3D07C1.thumb.jpeg.98dc85596284d6a80a0b4a915c951663.jpeg

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I have two trucks set up for towing,2500 dodge diesel and 1500 dodge, depending on where we are and what we are planning to do,the 2500 is used for pulling the gravel trailer when we are at our lake property,more of a work truck,the coach stays on the east coast,it is a 4 day drive at 8/9 hours a day. I will carry the rubber only from the last time I changed tires as a spare in the box of the truck, if I did happen to flat out I would use my road side assistance, it may cost me a few dollars for the guy to take it to a tire shop to put it on the rim.I have two tires, one in Nova Scotia and one in Ontario.much lighter off a rim, the way Ivan has it would be the way I would go other then just the rubber in the back of the truck.

Wayne 

1999 Signature ceaser 

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3 hours ago, tmw188 said:

I wouldn’t put it on a rim because you don’t know if and when you’ll need on a inny or a outy? (Rear or Steer)

Only difference is in which rim side is polished, if aluminum rim.. Who cares, it is only to get me out of a pinch and to a place where I can get correct tire on my terms. I carry the few tools needed to swap a wheel or a tire because we go places where my roadside assistance might take a while to find us, like until next day which happened to me long time ago.

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Ivan is correct.  Only one side of the aluminum rim is polished.  You will be able to tell the difference when mounted.  That is why I never rotated my tires.  

4 hours ago, Dwight said:

I’m interested to learn the heat aspect also. Thx

Heat and UV light are the worst conditions for a tire.  

When a tire gets flat, you are doing good to get the coach off on the side of the road at a place where there will be room to work on it.  

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4 hours ago, Jdw12345 said:

Please explain……

I’m talking about if it the spare was mounted on a steer (front) rim and you ended up needing it for the rear (inny or dish)wheel instead. 

1 hour ago, Ivan K said:

Only difference is in which rim side is polished, if aluminum rim.. Who cares, it is only to get me out of a pinch and to a place where I can get correct tire on my terms. I carry the few tools needed to swap a wheel or a tire because we go places where my roadside assistance might take a while to find us, like until next day which happened to me long time ago.

My rear outside wheel is quite deep.

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4 minutes ago, Chuck B 2004 Windsor said:

Same depth as the inside of the front wheel.  

I suppose I could be wrong but I sure didn’t think they looked the same even though they are reversed? 

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Try Not to run over what is called a recap road gator.  It can get stuck between the dual rear tires doing a lot of damage to the interior above it, the bottom of the engine and tranny.  

1 hour ago, tmw188 said:

I suppose I could be wrong but I sure didn’t think they looked the same even though they are reversed? 

There is a ole saying that beauty is in the eye of the beholder

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I believe if you try and double up on the aluminum wheels (drive axle) the studs are not long enough to accommodate two aluminum wheels, the steel wheels are much thinner, I haven’t tried it but I have had the drive tires off on the passenger side and I recall looking at the stud length saying I would need a steel wheel for a spare because of the studs not being long enough! I have a steel rim for a spare, it will work in any position!

Edited by Jdw12345
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I have three different wheels on my 06 Dynasty, front outside polished chrome, rear outside dually polished chrome and an inner painted steel rim.

I would recommend only carrying the rubber and NOT a rim as you won't know what wheel that tire will need to be used on in an emergency.

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13 minutes ago, Jdw12345 said:

I believe if you try and double up on the aluminum wheels (drive axle) the studs are not long enough to accommodate two aluminum wheels, the steel wheels are much thinner, I haven’t tried it but I have had the drive tires off on the passenger side and I recall looking at the stud length saying I would need a steel wheel for a spare because of the studs not being long enough! I have a steel rim for a spare, it will work in any position!

Correct, my Alcoa wheels are 3/8" thicker than the steels, my studs would be 1/4" too short to go through the nut all the way with 2 aluminum rims and this is why I have tire irons with me to swap the tire. Still have 6 in 8 chance to be right. And there are only 2 types of my wheels, aluminum and steel and they are reversible. Different part numbers depending which side is made shiny, that's all.  Anyone who has ever swapped tires knows how easy it is, for someone willing. I do have Coachnet but still choose to carry the spare, personal choice. 

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56 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

I have three different wheels on my 06 Dynasty, front outside polished chrome, rear outside dually polished chrome and an inner painted steel rim.

I would recommend only carrying the rubber and NOT a rim as you won't know what wheel that tire will need to be used on in an emergency.

Well that’s what I believed too in post 4 of this thread but have been told otherwise? But in post 10 I expressed I still had some doubt about that. Maybe some are different. He is talking about a Endeavor though. 🤷🏾‍♂️

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I guess my assumption was that anyone carrying a mounted spare would have mounted it on a steel rim, 8 out of 8 chances you’d be right. And if you carried the tools to change it out you’d be totally self sufficient on the road if problems accrued. Hopefully if you didn’t carry a mounted spare the aluminum rim wouldn’t get damaged during the event, chances are that it wouldn’t, my luck it would! 

  I’ve done my own tires since 1986, truck tires anyway!

 My shop at home in the picture below.
 

 

052E0BA1-AA8A-400F-ABED-8F21560E5ECE.jpeg

Edited by Jdw12345
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One reason I carry rubber already mounted on a new white steel rim is it can quickly get somebody rolling again regardless of tag, inner/outer drive, or steer position. I have had some tire shops refuse to work on my steers because they have Tyron bands.  My hope is it is wasted effort to carry it as I plan to never need it, but it is there if I or a travel buddy have a need.  Later, under less stress, I can get a new tire I want mounted back on hopefully the still serviceable original rim thus putting the spare back on the carrier.

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That’s my opinion too! ^
 

   One other thing to consider if anyone plans on changing your own tires on the road, make sure the jack you have will fit under the axle when you have a flat! Fwiw!

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A lot of great advice here so far Rik. My experience for the past 5 years was carrying a mounted steel rim and keeping it at the inflated rate in the basement of my Dutchstar.  This spring when I purchased my Windsor and transferred it over I barely had the strength to get it in the slideout tray.

That being said, using this type of mount, are you physically able to insert and remove when needing to access the engine compartment. Or will that not have any effect. I like having it and have also been following the torque multiplier thread to determine if i want to be completely sufficient, which I do. As we all know getting stuck on the highway somewhere and being told it will be hours b4 help can arrive, can be nerve racking. I will appreciate being completely prepared. There are plenty of good people out there willing to lend a hand, whether you are prepared or not. I am very thankful though, that we've never had to use it and hope we never do. Best of luck Rik

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