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Front Film Removal


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The film on the front of our 06 Executive is ok except the top panel above the top of the generator roll-out door. The edge next to the windshield has pealed back a bit and the paint is faded. I've watched a few videos on removing the film but want to know what people in the real world have done to remove the film. Did Monaco use 3-M or Diamond Shield, as I understand each has a different removal process?  As I mentioned, I only have to do the top 12" under the windshield, as the rest still looks good.   

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Anyone have real world experience with effective chemicals that won't remove or soften paint?  I'm also about to embark on this project for all the film in mine. I know there is the Uglyshield solvent but I'm hoping for an off-the-shelf solution. 

Edited by Steve P
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You can use a steam gun with plastic razor blades and softener chemicals.  

Or, some have used a 3000psi pressure washer to cut and break up the film. Then use chemicals to remove the resin.

You can use the 3M adhesive remover, one of the citrus adhesive remover, or one of the other solvents available.  

If the paint is dull or damaged it's best to have the area repainted.  (Don't even bother removong the film).

Almost always the tops of the front and rear caps need painting anyway. 

Good luck!

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The folks at "Ugly Film" used steam and plastic razors, then a solvent to remove the residue. Took two days for the entire front of the coach, cost was$2000 less a Military Discount. When finished, the coach looked new.

Bill B 07 Dynasty

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5 hours ago, vito.a said:

You can use a steam gun with plastic razor blades and softener chemicals.  

Or, some have used a 3000psi pressure washer to cut and break up the film. Then use chemicals to remove the resin.

You can use the 3M adhesive remover, one of the citrus adhesive remover, or one of the other solvents available.  

If the paint is dull or damaged it's best to have the area repainted.  (Don't even bother removong the film).

Almost always the tops of the front and rear caps need painting anyway. 

Good luck!

If I'm going to have the area repainted, does the shop just sand the film off in their prep process? 

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15 hours ago, Venturer said:

The film on the front of our 06 Executive is ok except the top panel above the top of the generator roll-out door. The edge next to the windshield has pealed back a bit and the paint is faded. I've watched a few videos on removing the film but want to know what people in the real world have done to remove the film. Did Monaco use 3-M or Diamond Shield, as I understand each has a different removal process?  As I mentioned, I only have to do the top 12" under the windshield, as the rest still looks good.   

We were at the FMCA Rally at Tucson several weeks ago and had someone knock on my door and talk about film removal. He says they only use steam. They are in Mesa and as you are in Lake Havasu not that far. Quoted me $1600 for my coach. It is called Glue be Gone, 651-206-0766. Gluebegone.net Good luck and hope this helps, Don

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30 minutes ago, diplomat don said:

We were at the FMCA Rally at Tucson several weeks ago and had someone knock on my door and talk about film removal. He says they only use steam. They are in Mesa and as you are in Lake Havasu not that far. Quoted me $1600 for my coach. It is called Glue be Gone, 651-206-0766. Gluebegone.net Good luck and hope this helps, Don

Negatory on post  on “SAND ‘ER OFF”…..

Dazzling Detail in FL is the most common used.  They run trucks to shows all over the country.  They use razor blades and a “spay”….pump typel.  You would spend says sanding and then ruin your paint.  You “peel” off the old film. Do a sanitizing (bleach) cleaning to kill any fungus or mold or mildew.  Then a solvent wash…..Acetone or similar.  Then you do a “ding and chip” filling.  Same thing a used car prep shop does.  TheY color match (blend) on site.  You can order a fiberglass Gelcoat mixing kit.  Get 5 or more bottles or small bottles of different color and then you mix and match the color….add hardener….and then “expertly” touch up or fill the chips.  These can be done on stone dings or “peeling errors”.  The more careful or “experienced” the stripping person, the FEWER the chips or gouges to fill.  Sharpened 1/8” dowell or toothpicks are the application tool, unless you have tiny stiff artist’s brushes.  Light sand or blend and then buff the area…clean it with solvent or the “activator” for the film….and they start cutting pieces to reapply.  One shop used narrow strips of blue painter tape to outline the seams in the original….and then matched or cut similar pieces of the new film,  2 PLUS day job….with 2 techs….depending on the surface  damage from chips and minimizing the gouge “OPPS”.

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  • Solution
Posted (edited)

I decided to remove just the top edge below the windshield. That is the only area that was pealing. It is about 1-2" wide and tapers to nothing at the sides. A Blow dryer and plastic chisel from Harbor Freight made for easy removal. The hardest part is getting the glue off, but patience and Goo Gone seems to do it. The rest of the front is fairly good yet.  It's not as nice as complete replacement, however, I won't have to look at the pealing film every time I walk by.   😎  There is some checking on the upper panel between what I have done and the top of the generator slide out. The film comes off fairly easy while holding a hair dryer in front of the chisel and slowly pealing it off. Plus, I found the glue comes off easier if heated and rubbing it in with my fingers. I can see doing that panel some afternoon when I get bored. It sure beats paying someone else $150 or more per hour to do it. 

Edited by Venturer
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Hello all - When I removed the Diamond Shield from the front of our rig, I ended up having the most success with Xylene (a solvent available at most hardware or paint stores) and plastic chisel/scrapers from Harbor Freight. I tried everything from acetone to goo-gone to goof off, etc. The Xylene likely causes 8 different types of cancer (!) and smells nasty. I'd recommend wearing a mask and gloves for sure and only working outdoors or in an extremely well-ventilated place. That said, the Xylene did a great job of dissolving the adhesive into a nasty mucus-like slime that was easy to scrape off. The Xylene did not harm the paint at all, and I avoided damaging the paint as I had done on a previous rig when I tried to "chip" the coating off and ended up removing paint and finish as well. I used a spray bottle and series of old rags to apply the Xylene, and then the scrapers and more rags to wipe off the gross sticky mucus.

Like others, I also used a steamer to remove the leftover adhesive and goo as well as straggling remnants of Diamond Shield. When I finished, it looked great, but I also understood why removing the covering was an expensive job to hire out.

Best of luck, and I hope that this helps.

John

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  • 1 month later...

I started removing the film from the panel above the generator. The center section peeled off fairly easy with a heat gun and scrapper. Goo Gone soaked up the residue and was able to scrape it off with the same plastic blade. I then cleaned and polished it. It was pretty easy and went quickly. As I started around the curve toward the door, I was leaving more glue residue. The Goo Gone took some off, but after three applications, I'm not getting the last of it off. As John mentioned, is this a job for a steamer and or Xylene? If I can't find a simple way to remove the rest of the glue residue, I don't want to attempt removing any below the top section as I might have gotten lucky with the first section due to more sun damage.    

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