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Help please. Stranded on the side of the road!!


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My hydraulic pump hose blew out going on I84 in Oregon. 
 

the elbow fitting came out of it. The pump threads are stripped. QCC. Model CPB-1033. I can’t find this pump anywhere. 
 

I am supposed to be back at work tomorrow and have my kid back at school. Dealing with a great mobile repair guy but need to be able to get this pump. 
 

Anybody have any ideas how to source one??

 

Thank you

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I doubt you're going to get one fast. The alternatives I'd consider, tapping for a larger fitting, a helicoil for a larger fitting (not sure they make helicoils for ORB fittings), or clean it with brake cleaner, jbweld or similar the fitting in there with the nut finger tight, then warm after curing an hour for the next 24 hours. 

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Tapping for a larger fitting might be the trick. Need to see if the mobile mechanic has the ability to do so. 
 

Thank you. 

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Remove the locknut from the elbow.  Then grind, mill, or turn down the lock nut on a lathe to half thickness.  Then install the new elbow and screw the elbow into the pump as far as possible before locking the nut. 

Make sure the hose is long enough and there is some freedom so it doesn't pull the fitting out again. 

I'd also clean the pump orifice well and use some JB Weld on the new elbow threads when installing.   

Good luck!

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Unfortunately, I am three hours from home. This was supposed to be a short one night trip with my daughter and we decided to take the coach instead of paying for a hotel room. 
 

I need to get home first. 
 

Here is what I think I will try:

Plan A: remove the lock nut completely and pray there is enough thread left for it to hold. The threads on the elbow are all full of metal so I need something to chase them with so I can get the nut off. I also need tools I hope the mobile mechanic has to get the elbow off the hydraulic hose. If there are enough threads I will Teflon tape the crap out of it and pray I make it home. 
 

Plan B: If not enough threads then insert pipe into the pump that is long enough to hit the hood threads with enough hanging out the bottom to get some sort of adapter to fit on. Teflon it all up and pray. 
 

If I can get it home I will tear the pump off and see about a replacement. I also need a new hydraulic line as this one is so stiff it won’t absorb any vibration and is this putting pressure on the weakest link, the threads. 
 

What do you think about this plan?

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That is a boss o-ring fitting. The fractional size corresponds to a dash number.  The only way that fitting could have blown out is because the lock nut was not tightened down when it was installed. I would be concerned that over time the vibration might have wore the male thread and female pump thread.  Vito has a good suggestion. That would extend the new fitting deeper into new female pump thread territory. Lock Tite makes a sealant specifically designed for hydraulic applications. You probably could get by with the old fitting and without the o ring lock nut temporarily with the sealant. File the end of the fitting until it tightens in the desired direction.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Gary Cole
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Teflon tape does not go on an Oring boss fitting.  It is designed to seal with the o ring, the threads will not seal without something like JBweld.  It's possible a hydraulic shop has a longer threaded fitting.  I believe the ORB end of that fitting will have two threaded spots with a smooth section between, the o ring needs to be in the smooth section to seal.  You could remove the o ring, washer and nut and thread the fitting in deeper with JBweld/epoxy and hope for the best.  you could try backing the nut off as far as it will go or grinding it to half thickness, the oring would be destroyed sealing on the threads, but may hold to get home. 

The o ring boss is designed for fittings like this, the nut is backed off, the fitting it aligned to the proper direction, and then the nut tightens the o ring in that position.  Try not to turn the o ring while the nut is tight. 

Edited by Benjamin
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The threads inside of the pump are toast up to about half way in. 
 

I understand the purpose of the o ring boss fitting. I tightened it about 6 months ago because there was a leak. I believe this was the precursor to todays failure. 
 

I just need a quick fix to get me home. I understand it will leak some. The back of the coach and the underside has at least 5 gallons of dexron all over right now as it is. I can’t even see out of the back up camera. 
 

Will the lock rite help it stay put or am I going to vibrate the threads out again on my way home?

The threads in yellow are all stripped. They are in the threads of the elbow. 

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Maybe new plan a. 
 

You have to understand that I am an hour away from the closest town, have no toad so am at the whim of whomever I pay to help me. So, I want to get it done right the first time and the fastest way. 
 

Would it be possible that a hydraulics shop would have a new elbow with a longer shaft that I could screw in there and use the same o-ring compression nut with?

 

Thoughts

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There is no getting this done fast and right.  IT could work to remove the nut and thread it in with lots of teflon, doesn't need to be ATF, a five gallon bucket of hydraulic fluid will work in an emergency.  

I doubt you'd find anybody to machine a longer elbow, but a straight fitting would be possible from ORB to JIC flare, or a straight ORB with longer threads, then weld into an elbow fitting?

I had been assuming this is the pressure side, but if the bottom hose or hoses are smaller, or this comes from the reservoir, then this is the suction side and your problem is immensely easier. 

Edited by Benjamin
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Chad the fittings all correspond to SAE specs so there is not a fitting with a longer shaft. It would be better to start with a new fitting. However if that is not possible your mobile mechanic come out a file and some kind of two part epoxy or anaerobic sealant.  Even lock tite thread locker would be a good option.  The ideal would be to bottom out the fitting in the right direction. The threads are not tapered so it will not tighten like a pipe thread. You might leak a gallon or two of oil however hopefully you could get home. 

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Fixing it right will come at a latter time. I mean fix it so I can get home the first time. If the mechanic has to go to town to get something after he comes out here I am out another $250 each trip as it is 100 miles round trip at $2.50 a mile. 
 

Gary, I know nothing about these fittings but from what I gather you are saying is that there is no such thing as an elbow with a longer shaft?  And, since there is no taper they need that fitting to keep it from leaking but I should be ok for a couple hours. 
 

Benjamin, it is on the non pressurized, or suction, side coming from the tank. I lost everything in there in the span of 1/2 mile. Big mess. My mud flap is still dripping. 
 

I greatly appreciate all your expertise on this. It has been a tremendous help. 
 

I will continue to update. 

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1 minute ago, Chad A said:

Benjamin, it is on the non pressurized, or suction, side coming from the tank. I lost everything in there in the span of 1/2 mile. Big mess. My mud flap is still dripping. 
 

That obviously changes everything.  Removing the nut, oring and threading it in all the way with teflon tape is a reasonable emergency fix.  Plastic shopping bag cut in strips and stretched makes a fine substitute for teflon also.  Fill it with whatever oil you have available. 

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Would something like this work??

 

How do I know exactly what size I am dealing with?  I do have a tape measure but unfortunately left my tools at home. 

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You sure don't need a $300 stainless steel fitting.  it will be a 10-20 dollar fitting, but I think Gary is right, there won't be a longer thread version available unless it's made up by a machinist.  A tape measure is close enough to determine the size, discounthydraulic hose has a thread id chart that will give you the exact thread outside diameter for different nominal thread sizes.  looks like 1" from here, but my eyes aren't as good as they used to be. 1" would be 1 3/16", 7/8" would be 1 5/16" and 1 1/4" would be 1 5/8" actual thread outside diameter. 

I don't think a new fitting is going to gain you much.  Clean the aluminum threads out of the steel threads with a wire wheel on a grinder, or a utility knife blade, if you dull the utility knife blade, break a tiny bit off with a pliers for new sharp digging point. 

Edited by Benjamin
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I would never by the $300 fitting unless that was my only choice. And at this point it is way cheaper than a $3500 tow bill!!

 

I think the nut needs a 2 inch wrench. I will get a tape on it in the morning. 
 

Thanks again. 

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Looking at this picture I would if it were me drill a hole thru the side of the pump and into the elbow fitting where it enters the pump, secure it with screws after sealing it with some good sealant. Maybe two screws one on each side 180 from each other. Be creative keeping the shavings out. Maybe you can wire tie some wraps around the elbow and the pump tightly as another option. Good luck. 

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everybody has a FIX.  Agree to get the pump functional, you need to get that fitting working.  My solution would be to clean the entire fitting up with something like acetone or even isopropyl alcohol.  Then, make do with a seal.  

I would NOT DRILL into the pump.  I would jury rig something from stainless steel band clamps and try to lock that fitting down to the pump body.  BE CLEVER...find a bolt of something where you can attach a bracket or whatever.  THEN....DRIVE ON...

Good Luck

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I've made several onsite repairs with metal putty resin. It really depends on how much pressure is on that side of the pump. You can get that stuff at any auto parts store.  You put a liberal amount on the fitting itself. Clean the threads thoroughly......I can't stress this enough. ( a proper seal will never happen without doing so) and after you install the fitting more putty on the outside edge. Almost like making a cocoon. This is just a temp fix......but is should last long enough to get you home. If you clean it good enough and let it harden .......you'll need a chisel to remove it. 

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When I worked for a company that did a lot of hydraulics the guys in the service trucks would use green loctite as a patch in a situation like your in. It won’t make it easy to come apart later but might get you home.

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3 minutes ago, Craggar said:

When I worked for a company that did a lot of hydraulics the guys in the service trucks would use green loctite as a patch in a situation like your in. It won’t make it easy to come apart later but might get you home.

I had to do a LOT of analysis of Loctite as Ford wanted us (we made carburetors) to use it on some critical applications.  In addition, we had to do gauge control adjustments and needed to be be able to LOCK down a gauge...but then adjust or calibrate it later on.... I was also in charge of Maintenance and had to help decide DO WE REALLY WANT TO USE LOCTITE.... Here is what I know...

Green.  You can always BREAK this loose.  Green is used, as we recommend it, for electrical fitting.  That means it is in the 4 - 5 FOOT POUNDS (the ATS Terminals are where it is to be used....you put about 40 Inch Pounds).  It is mean for vibration, as in a fastener or fitting like an electrical one...or one you can pull apart. An average man could easily break loose GREEN (like on an electrical terminal) with a BIG handle Screwdriver (wrapped with a rough shop towel).

Blue... That is used for a SEMI Permanent application.  Such as a bolt or fastener that is hand tightened...or you use normal wrenches or short ratchets.  You can (PER LOCTITE) break the joint loose with normal hand tools...  like a longer ratchet or even with a long handled combo wrench.

RED.  The PERMANENT.  This is recommended, for us, for installing the Base Plates on the Toad or critical components on the suspension (think adding a Watts Link or a steering stabilizer. READ "can be broken with an IMPACT wrench and or  HEATING".  My Carburetor company always used RED on the gauges.  BUT, this was on very small fasteners.  SIMPLE.  We had a 150 Watt soldering iron.  Put that on a 1/4" allen head or a bolt.  30 seconds later....it is liquid.  I ONCE made the mistake of using RED on a Telescopic mount on a rifle.  NEVER AGAIN..  BLUE.  BUT, I used a small propane pencil torch.  BINGO removed easily...

That's MY Loctite knowledge and experience....over 30 years...

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Mobile tech is supposed to be here in about an hour. 🤞

 

Thank you for all the suggestions. 
 

If I put something that is soluble in this fitting will I risk contaminating the hydraulic system?  I don’t want one fix to cause another problem. 
 

At this point I am thinking shove that fitting back in there.  Take a couple hose clamps and strap it up in there and then use the nut with gasket to try and seal it off. 
 

Any reason this won’t work since this is the intake side of the pump?

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8 minutes ago, Chad A said:

Mobile tech is supposed to be here in about an hour. 🤞

 

Thank you for all the suggestions. 
 

If I put something that is soluble in this fitting will I risk contaminating the hydraulic system?  I don’t want one fix to cause another problem. 
 

At this point I am thinking shove that fitting back in there.  Take a couple hose clamps and strap it up in there and then use the nut with gasket to try and seal it off. 
 

Any reason this won’t work since this is the intake side of the pump?

AS I SAID.  FIX IT.  Clamps are your FRIEND.  Even drive a wooden wedge in place.  MECHANICAL SEAL or FASTENING... Now, if you use something that is a sealer (like Loctite or such)...DON'T SWEAT IT.  There will be 0.001% or whatever in it.  Loctite WOULD work...even the RED.  YES.. RED.  It is an anearobic (sp?) and seals.  It won't hurt the O-Ring.  GET IT FIXED.  Clamp that sucker DOWN.  After you get it clamped down....then on the EXTERIOR...clean with alcohol or a solvent and then put on a tube of whatever sealer the tech has.  Let it set up or skin over.  Once your start the engine, the heat will cure it.  SINCE IT IS EXTERNAL...you cut it off for the permanent repair. When you cut off al the external sealer... a propane torch, with the hose protected will remove even the cured Loctite...

That's what I would DO.  BUT...hey I am just like the rest....and it may not make sense to others.....  FIX IT AND GET HOME....DON'T leave the MH and Don't spend $THOUSANDS to tow or haul it.

Good LUCK...

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