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Battery Compartment Rust


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A while back there was a post on product(s) used to counter rust on the battery compartment tray.  I've searched the various topics on this forum and can't find it. One in particular used a paint/primer and a type board (if memory serves correctly) to protect the tray. Looking for some input/suggestions.  TIA

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Most important is to clean the metal.  I garden hose wash to get rid of majority of acid.  Then power wash (put eye protection on as there may be acid in the water).  Then, treat with baking soda to neutralize any remaining acid.  Clean again after a few minutes.

Dry.  Then wire wheel or better yet,  sand blast.

Fix any corrosion spots (weld, or even body plastic if cosmetics are important).

Wire wheel any welds.

Mask bearings

Prime with a quality auto primer

Top coat.  Can use Por15 if you like.

Reasemble.  grease bearings.  Put all back together.  Clean electrical connections.  Rewire.  Label all wires.

Edited by DavidL
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Several years ago I had to do the same. Only I did rot use regular primer. I used a rattle can of black rust converter that also acts as a primer. So far after about 6 years, it has held up very well and I am very satisfied. 

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Phosphoric acid Is the active ingredient in all the rust removers (and in sodas) and I buy it by the gallon below. It’s worth painting with the paint below after properly prepping…or just use AGM batteries and now Lithium.

03B52175-8023-4EEE-A821-82D286424C74.png

E9FEDBF3-7A90-44B8-BE61-9E0E506BD142.png

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Yeah I used phosporic acid on mine. Then I coated with two part urethane paint that I had left over from another project. See the pho. tos. They are out of order finished is first, the rust then after acid. I also used epoxy to seal the corners where the acid could seep down between the frame.

20211127_114137.jpg

20211125_103702.jpg

20211126_153057.jpg

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I second the Lithium battery suggestion.  Far superior batteries.  I converted my golf cart to Lithium.  No more corrosion.  No more water refilling.  

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On 2/23/2022 at 5:19 PM, DavidL said:

Most important is to clean the metal.  I garden hose wash to get rid of majority of acid.  Then power wash (put eye protection on as there may be acid in the water).  Then, treat with baking soda to neutralize any remaining acid.  Clean again after a few minutes.

Dry.  Then wire wheel or better yet,  sand blast.

Fix any corrosion spots (weld, or even body plastic if cosmetics are important).

Wire wheel any welds.

Mask bearings

Prime with a quality auto primer

Top coat.  Can use Por15 if you like.

Reasemble.  grease bearings.  Put all back together.  Clean electrical connections.  Rewire.  Label all wires.

Good advice, except use POR15 directly on the rusty metal.  That's what it's made for, and it works very well.
As long as it's not exposed to direct sunlight, it is fine by itself.  If you want a different look, POR-15 makes a tie-coat primer that allows topcoating with another paint.

I've been using POR-15 products for decades, and their products are excellent for their intended purpose.

On 2/24/2022 at 7:44 AM, Ivylog said:

Phosphoric acid Is the active ingredient in all the rust removers (and in sodas) and I buy it by the gallon below. It’s worth painting with the paint below after properly prepping…or just use AGM batteries and now Lithium.

03B52175-8023-4EEE-A821-82D286424C74.png

E9FEDBF3-7A90-44B8-BE61-9E0E506BD142.png

Hadn't seen the acid proof paint.  Sounds like a good product.
I'd use it over the POR-15 and tie-coat primer.

I'm actually not sure of the acid resistance of POR-15.

Edited by dl_racing427
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When I pulled mine, I used OSPHO rust remover as directed and painted with a truck bed spray paint giving a little more protection. 

20210102_115042.jpg

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