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Glendinning Electric reel


Grampy OG

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The electric reel (shore power) is buried in the back closet of my coach and cannot be seen. A small door panel opens on the outside at the very rear of the driver's side of the coach and the cord is pulled in or pushed out electrically as needed. In the rear closet a substantially sized carpeted box located to (I assume) house the electric cord reel. Should the need arise (and most needs do) does anybody have a clue how to open that box short of using a saws-all? It seems to be perfectly carpeted and I can't find a screw or nail anywhere to attempt to open it. Should the reel fail I would like to be able to at least pull the cord manually so that I am not marooned somewhere. For sure there is no access through the engine compartment. Any thoughts will be appreciated. 

Thanks,

Ken Wilcox - 2003 The Executive 

 

 

 

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Ken,

I have a 03 Exec although I due not have a box just a solid wall. The air intake is above the cord reel behind the wall. My reel slips sometimes badly and the adjustment requires interior access. Glending later models allow adjustment thru the exterior access opening. I'm very interested in what you find out. please keep me posted.

JoeB 03 Exec PBDD

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Gentlemen

 

I have a 03 Sig with what sounds like a similar setup for the reel. Mine had I believe 1 screw in the middle of the upper side secured to the side wall, you have to look for the screw but it's there. Once removed the entire cap ( mine is plywood) will come up a reveal the entire setup.

 

Hal S 03 Sig

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I have one of the Glendinning RLC  power reels that drops the cord into a storage bin. It is mounted in the wet bay.

i bought a new shore cord that was a smaller diameter (7/8” diameter) and called Glendinning support to ask if it would handle the smaller diameter cord. Their support let me know that Newmar wanted to fit a smaller diameter cord and they had some different rollers made for the mechanism and they sold me some for a modest price.

The smaller diameter cord works great and I get more cord on the reel.

I have always found Glendinning support to be great with good part availability and fair pricing.

Paul

Edited by pwhittle
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I have often wondered if our coach could be retrofitted with a power reel. We have the box you speak of and our is very accessible since a previous owner changed the carpet. Does anyone know if this is possible since we do not have any exterior access and I am not fond of cutting a hole in the body?

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12 hours ago, pwhittle said:

I have one of the Glendinning RLC  power reels that drops the cord into a storage bin. It is mounted in the wet bay.

i bought a new shore cord that was a smaller diameter (7/8” diameter) and called Glendinning support to ask if it would handle the smaller diameter cord. Their support let me know that anew at wanted to fit a smaller diameter cord and they had some different rollers made for the mechanism and they sold me some for a modest price.

The smaller diameter cord works great and I get more cord on the reel.

I have always found Glendinning support to be great with good part availability and fair pricing.

Paul

Paul,

Can you add a link to the 7/8” diameter cord you bought? How much longer is the new cord?

John

’06 Knight 40DFD

Edited by johncvandoren@gmail.com
I’d
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It was this one.

Southwire 19190008 6/3 & 8/1 SEOW 50 Amp, 125/250-Volt Outdoor Extension Cord CA-Style CS63 Twist-Lock, Custom Blended Jacket, Extra Hard Usage Cord, 100-Feet, 100-Foot, Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002899ZC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_4MiTEbTE60ADM

I found one on eBay for $50 less. I have 54’ outside the motorhome. There is probably another 12’ to get into the power reel and to the Progressive EMS on its way to the Transfer switch,

F2F7EE7B-1AD9-4759-98CC-C040520536FC.jpeg.a1e78f6625b809ce2309a0743987c282.jpeg

Edited by pwhittle
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We have an 04 Executive and there are 2-3 screws on the engine side at the bottom of the box at an angle and 2-3 screws on the drivers side wall at an angle, square drive flat heads.  We have had it off many times more than we'd like to remember.  Just use a screwdriver and run it along the edge and you will find the screws.

 

 

 

Larry & Ellen Clark

2004 Monaco Executive SBW

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Hello Paul,  Question on your smaller cord.  How is the flexibility in cold weather?  I probably have the same glendinning setup as you had where the cord (after the friction rollers) must twist and coil itself as it flops into the round storage box.  My existing and presumed original cord gets pretty stiff in cold weather and I have to help push it up to the rollers and into the box.  The advantage of the flopping design vs a rotating reel is being good solid connections through the box as there is no rotating contactor that is prone to fail, but cold weather has always been hard to wind up.  The extra length would be pretty handy at times too.

I'm wondering what your post words "anew at" in "let me know that anew at wanted to fit"  really meant.

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Guest Cruzbill

3 wire cord = 30 amps; 4 wire cord = 50 amps. Does your coach run two A/C's on 30 amp service? 

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1 hour ago, Cruzbill said:

3 wire cord = 30 amps; 4 wire cord = 50 amps. Does your coach run two A/C's on 30 amp service? 

His cord is a 50 amp 4 wire cord. Three 6s and an 8 for the ground. Assuming that's what you meant. As far as 2 a/c on 30 amp, mine will if I have nothing else running. Turn on the TV the EMS starts shutting things down. I no longer try @ 30amps because I'm concerned it stresses out the A/C units. i have three 15k BTU heat pumps. Don't know about the 13.5BTU units. They may work fine @30Amps....Dennis

Edited by Dennis H
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2 hours ago, Cruzbill said:

Does your coach run two A/C's on 30 amp service? 

FWIW, If needed, I flip the breakers going to the inverter so there is no pass thru and the batteries power the fridge/satellite/TV/misc and can get by with two of the three 15k units running until the outside temp hits about 92 when the increased heat/resistance will cause 30A breaker to trip.  Then it becomes limp on one unit or generator time.  This assumes the 30A breaker at the pedestal isn't old and worn out, socket is good, etc.  Naturally I try for a 50A site if I know the electric demand will be needed.

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3 hours ago, amphi_sc said:

Hello Paul,  Question on your smaller cord.  How is the flexibility in cold weather?  I probably have the same glendinning setup as you had where the cord (after the friction rollers) must twist and coil itself as it flops into the round storage box.  My existing and presumed original cord gets pretty stiff in cold weather and I have to help push it up to the rollers and into the box.  The advantage of the flopping design vs a rotating reel is being good solid connections through the box as there is no rotating contactor that is prone to fail, but cold weather has always been hard to wind up.  The extra length would be pretty handy at times too.

I'm wondering what your post words "anew at" in "let me know that anew at wanted to fit"  really meant.

I meant to type Newmar.

 

I suspect that @scottyHutto has installed a filter so than no other brands can be mentioned on the forum, 😀

Edited by pwhittle
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46 minutes ago, Mel S - '96 Safari said:

Paul

I suspect that you spelled Newmar "anew at".

I suspect his phone auto corrected it for him. 😁 My wife went shopping the other day and texted me a picture of her in a new dress.  Asked me if it made her look fat. I texted back "Nooo"! My phone auto-corrected it to say "Mooo"! I've been eating alone the past few days......Dennis

  • Haha 3
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6 hours ago, amphi_sc said:

Hello Paul,  Question on your smaller cord.  How is the flexibility in cold weather?  I probably have the same glendinning setup as you had where the cord (after the friction rollers) must twist and coil itself as it flops into the round storage box.  My existing and presumed original cord gets pretty stiff in cold weather and I have to help push it up to the rollers and into the box.  The advantage of the flopping design vs a rotating reel is being good solid connections through the box as there is no rotating contactor that is prone to fail, but cold weather has always been hard to wind up.  The extra length would be pretty handy at times too.

I'm wondering what your post words "anew at" in "let me know that anew at wanted to fit"  really meant.

I have not used the new cord in cold weather, but it is SEOW which is pretty flexible.

My old cord had the same issue with needing to push it in. My collection bucket screws had come loose and it was moving around some. The PVC pipe was no longer connected. It was a mess.

As part of replacing the cord, I had the whole bucket and mechanism out and cleaned and lubed up the adjustment bolt threads. I also welded up a frame to go around the bucket base to provide additional screws into the floor to keep the bucket secure. I wanted to use bolts and large washers, but there is a thin metal plate below the floor that stopped that idea.

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18 hours ago, Dennis H said:

I suspect his phone auto corrected it for him. 😁 My wife went shopping the other day and texted me a picture of her in a new dress.  Asked me if it made her look fat. I texted back "Nooo"! My phone auto-corrected it to say "Mooo"! I've been eating alone the past few days......Dennis

LMAO 🤣

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On 5/8/2020 at 9:07 AM, amphi_sc said:

Hello Paul,  Question on your smaller cord.  How is the flexibility in cold weather?  I probably have the same glendinning setup as you had where the cord (after the friction rollers) must twist and coil itself as it flops into the round storage box.  My existing and presumed original cord gets pretty stiff in cold weather and I have to help push it up to the rollers and into the box.  The advantage of the flopping design vs a rotating reel is being good solid connections through the box as there is no rotating contactor that is prone to fail, but cold weather has always been hard to wind up.  The extra length would be pretty handy at times too.

I'm wondering what your post words "anew at" in "let me know that anew at wanted to fit"  really meant.

SEOW should remain flexible over a temperature range of -40 to 220 degrees Fahrenheit 

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When replacing my cord years ago, I talked to an engineer at Southwire ( I think) who pointed me to some specification page for multi-conductor cable.  Two important things came from that call.  First, he said ANY cord with an "E" in its designation (Elastomer) would probably be more flexible than any cord without it, and likely smaller outside diameter.  Hence SEOW. Second, he said that if cold-weather flexibility is paramount, NEVER choose a cord with a "T" in its designation.  "T" is for thermoplastic.  More than one kind of elastomer has been used.  His opinion was that EPDM was by far the best combination of flexible and durable.

I've noticed that the great majority of pre-made cords contain a "T", as did the STW cord I replaced.  It was really stiff in cold weather and was difficult for my homemade powered cord reel in front of the genny to coil up.  Replaced it with SEOW cable that was slightly smaller in outside diameter, and MUCH more flexible.  Like Paul, I had to make up my own cord from purchased bulk cable.  There are surely elastomer pre-made cords out there somewhere, but the only one I ever found was near double the price of all the rest.

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Cord Designations

Listed below are designations for cord characteristics based on Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 400.

S = Standard; rated at 600 VAC
SJ = Junior; rated at 300 VAC
E Elastomer; (thermoplastic rubber)
T = Thermoplastic
O = Oil-resistant outer jacket
OO = Oil-resistant insulation and outer jacket
P = Parallel construction (flat)
W = Approved for outdoor use
V = Lightweight, round vacuum cleaner cord

Just in case anyone always wanted to know the different designations and what to buy.. Keep in mind Chinese products don't necessarily have the same characteristics as USA made. In other words their "E" rating may or may not be the same as ours, so the pliability of the cord may be different......Dennis

Edited by Dennis H
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