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Shore power not showing on intellitec control panel


Wrayj1
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2007 Holiday Rambler Endeavor. 40 SKQ

Cummins 400 w/Allison 6 speed tranny

 

 

I took my cowch to a repair shop to have several little issues addressed in preparation for selling it.  I want everything look I ng good and working for the new owner.  One of tge items on my list was to remove batteries, clean, paint and lubricate the battery tray.  All the work was completed.  However, wheni plugged into my 20 amp circuit at home nothing registers on the control panel.  It shows 20 amps in, but the panel does not show that the batteries are charging, the invertor does not seem be on either.  The batteries show charged goid, but not fully charged.  Usually when I run slides in and out the panel will show that i am using 5 amps, tonight it shows one amp.  I am not very adept at this stuff and would appreciate any help.

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ODDS ARE.....you have a problem in the inverter.  NOW...If you have the Magnum....then this is the procedure.  If you have another brand....read up on the manual.

Either the MH's batteries went down or the Magnum got into a funk.  Taking out the batteries and doing all the work sometimes has real issues.

SO....here goes....  

First.... I assume that the Diplomat is the twin of the Endeavor.  So, I pulled your manual.

You have TWO systems.  The EMS (Intellitec Display) that shows the incoming power.  Next you have the Magnum Inverter Charger.  I do NOT believe that the Salesman's switch turns off power and would be the issue....BUT....push the button or the Battery Switch on the lower passenger console on the TOP.  That will latch in or give you power.  NOW, if your overhead house lights work and you have power to the Thermostat (push a button....does the thermostat LED light up?)....If so....rule out the salesman's switch.

VERY FIRST THING...UNPLUG THE 20 AMP CIRCUIT.....go to the ELECTRICAL PANEL.  Make SURE EVERY Circuit Breaker is ON....as well as the 50 amp one.  SOME folks say that if you cycle one on and off and do all of them...as well as the MAIN....that clears it up.... 

I could give you a LONG method....but lets try it simple.  unplug from the 120 20 Amp circuit....Will your Generator START?  MAKE SURE that the circuit breaker on the main panel on the Generator is ON.  Some shops kill everything....and forget to turn mess back on.

Try it.  IF it starts, then look at the EMS display.  You should see 30 amps displayed and there will be some numbers or current on the screen.  If you put a cup of water in the microwave....and run it for 30 seconds...you should see a 15 amp JUMP in whatever the load it.  That means your EMS is working properly.

Next....push the ON buttons on the Magnum display.  there are TWO in the lower corner.  One is the Inverter and the other is the charger.  Then the upper lights should come on.  You SHOULD see the batteries charging and say maybe "Bulk Charge....and maybe 75 or 80 amps.  

All should be well.  IF NOT....then we have to fix it...

Turn OFF the generator. Disconnect BOTH the HOUSE and the Chassis Batteries.....Negative FIRST.....wait maybe 5 or so minutes.  THEN disconnect the Positive....and wait.  NOW....put them both back on.  That resets the EMS if it has an issue. It also gives the inverter (Magnum) a little Time Out. OK....while you WAIT....go to the Inverter.  I am almost 100% from the manual sure you have the Magnum.  Look on the SIDE (usually right) side of it.  There will be at least ONE pin circuit breakers or little plastic hole with a small pin or plastic dowel sticking out.  PUSH THAT IN....if you have 3....do all three.  If there is ONE....that is the INCOMING power to the inverter.....

OK....reconnect the batteries.  NOW....start the Generator.  Let it run for maybe 4 or 5 minutes to get full exercised and ready for duty.

GO to the MAGNUM inverter.  Hold IN and keep holding the POWER button on the lower right (I think...there are different styles) and count to 20.  Release it.  Wait a minute or so.  THEN....push ON the power button.  This is called a SOFT RESET.... read this for more info...

https://www.magnum-dimensions.com/soft-reset-instructions-magnum-energy-inverterchargers

NOW....go inside.  If the Magnum is working....you should see the display that I described before.  IF NOT....what is on the display....push the ON buttons on the lower left.  You want to have GREEN lights on the UPPER right corner.  THEN you should be charging. 

 
That should fix it.  IF NOT....shoot a picture of the EMS display and the Magnum display and tell us WHAT is happening and post the picture....

Good Luck....

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Tom, thanks very much for the great trouble shooting list. I have gone thru all the steps you listed except disconnecting tye batteries etc, the EMS seems to be good, but still not charging. Next move is to disconnect the batteries and do the reset. I'm boing to defer that until next week when we meet some friends for an outing, they agreed to help so we can expecite the process and get back to relaxing with a margarita.  Here's to ya!  Cheers!

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2 hours ago, Wrayj1 said:

Tom, thanks very much for the great trouble shooting list. I have gone thru all the steps you listed except disconnecting tye batteries etc, the EMS seems to be good, but still not charging. Next move is to disconnect the batteries and do the reset. I'm boing to defer that until next week when we meet some friends for an outing, they agreed to help so we can expecite the process and get back to relaxing with a margarita.  Here's to ya!  Cheers!

OK…this also worked and there is a VERY HAPPY GUY CAMPING NOW.  If, the SOFT RESET doesn’t work….then go for broke.  Google Magnum Hard reset.  It is the same…..except you do it WITHOUT any power.  NO AC or shore or GENNY.  PULL off the three phone cables…..nothing connected   Disconnect both battery positive cables.  Then, on the back of the Magnum, disconnect the two battery leads.  I wanted them DEAD for safety.  Then do NOT Mess with it…let if sit in timeout for up to an hour. The procedure say 5 minutes…..nope an hour. That bleeds of any “ugly” current and the magnum has “cleared its head”.  Plug back in the three phone lines.  Connect the battery leads back.  Then the cables to the house and chassis.  Turn back on the disconnect switches…..Then you need AC power…shore or Genny.  
 

NOW…..stop here.  Hold in the power button for 20 seconds….then push it on.  You have done the hard reset, but when it powers back up…you repeat the soft.  Then go inside and you might have to turn it on.  There is STILL a one other trick…but it is simple….and I will not go there unless you still have issues…

Good luck

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Tom, Saturday i took my coach to stoorage at that time the battery charge level was reading yellow(good), i brought it home today anrd the battery level showed grern(fully charged) it was not plugged into shore power for the last two days.  Also the intellitec is reading DC 53.5v and 535a with the red fault light on.  The power button is green as well as the chg and inv.  Any idea why the DC 53.5v and 535a reading and should i disconnect my shore power?  Currently plugged into 15amp using dog bones.

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Ray, get it unplugged immediately for safety. 

It could just be a wonky display/reading but a voltage like that across a 12 volt battery bank is asking for an explosion.

I may be overreacting at the moment but my panic light is lit. 

We have a 2008 SKQ Endeavor so doubt you have any 48 volt systems unless highly modified.

After allowing a couple of hours after unplugging, IF possible, turn a breaker off as far away from the coach as possible. Do not just unplug if near the coach. The gasses built up from this could be tremendous.

Once things have calmed down, approach the battery compartment with old clothes, safety goggles, a fire extinguisher and water hose. Carefully open the battery compartment.

Now after everyone is rolling around the ground laughing at me for being crazy safety concerned just note that I have been involved in battery explosions and they were not fun. 

IF all things look and smell ok grab a voltmeter and start checking the battery voltages. 

From there we can move on and hopefully only find the systems need to be reset.

I re-read the thread. Mostly.

 

Did you happen to replace the coach batteries?? Did you install 12 volt batteries by accident and now have them in series? 

Stranger things have happened.

A picture of the battery compartment would really help.

 

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 IMyron, I have unplugged and will try to upload photos of battert bank aa well as intellitec readout.  Have not upload anything before, could use some help with that if I'm unsuccessful.  I presume the batteries would be veryhot to the touch if they are oveecharging?  They are not hot and there are no fumes or odd odors. However, after I did a rexet yexterday the fault light went away.  The reading I am currently getting on the intellitec board is DC charger standby, 80.4v. 603a.  I will send photo of battery bank after I get photo upload instruction.  I did not change batteriesI had a tech remove themto repair, clean and paint the battery tray as part of a list of repairs.

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A "tech" could have made a very bad mistake rewiring. 

Those voltage and current readings must be false or you would likely be looking at a puddle where the RV once stood.

Need to shut everything down for now. Turn the battery switches off as well.

I prefer to send or transfer pictures to my pc and then just drag them onto a post. 

 

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22 hours ago, Wrayj1 said:

Tom, Saturday i took my coach to stoorage at that time the battery charge level was reading yellow(good), i brought it home today anrd the battery level showed grern(fully charged) it was not plugged into shore power for the last two days.  Also the intellitec is reading DC 53.5v and 535a with the red fault light on.  The power button is green as well as the chg and inv.  Any idea why the DC 53.5v and 535a reading and should i disconnect my shore power?  Currently plugged into 15amp using dog bones.

Need to clarify some things.  The Intellitec’s display does not read VOLTAGE.  You seem to be confusing the Magnum Inverter with The Intellitec display. the Magnum remote for your inverter charger DOES read voltage and amperage.  The Intellitec does not. Look at the picture below.  Note the logo INTELLITEC.  

I’m a little apprehensive if you don’t quite have the names and understanding. I should have picked that up in your Saturday post.  MY BAD.

Back to basics….DO NOT DO ANYTHING ELSE. If anyone other than a moderator or an administrator or perhaps Myron offers suggestions, please hold off.  
 

NEED SOME PICTURES. UNPLUG ALL POWER.  DO AS MYRON SUGGESTS.  I WILL LEAVE THIS POST “OPEN”, BUT UNTIL YOU POST SOME   PICTURES, YOU MIGHT HAVE A MAJOR ISSUE.  FAILURE TO DO THIS AND THE POST IS FROZEN. WE NEED TO SEE THE FOLLOWING.

Picture of the HOUSE bank and the 4 batteries.  Need the picture to show the top cables and HOW they are connected. 

Picture of the Magnum Remote….see the bottom photo.

Picture of the top or side of an individual battery.  Need the name and model or markings.  Need to see the VOLTAGE and any other label.  You did not specify if you had new batteries.  If you had new batteries installed and they were 12 VDC instead of 6 VDC and the “unknowing” tech or “not qualified assistant” wired them in series….or like a golf cart….all strung together….then, it is possible that you would be reading 53 Volts.  I will not comment on how dumb that is….but you might need a lawyer to sue the company for gross negligence and to recover the damages.  THIS IS THAT SERIOUS.

take the pictures.  Email them to yourself.  Then copy or move them into a file or put on your desktop…then drag them, as Myron suggests to post them.

if that fails then, test them to me.  Unfortunately I have put my phone number there.  Click on my picture and scroll down,  it is there.

DO NOT do anything else until we see the pictures….this is SERIOUS….

Thanks….

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06488DB5-BD21-4E5F-ADA5-8008AE40A436.jpeg

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Here is the latest as i see it.  I have probably not given proper names to things.  The EMS shows 20 amps incoming, and power to the water heater, the washer/dryer, and front and rear ac's.  The power light is green as well as the chargee abd inverter lights, no fault indicated.  However the read out for v and a zre steady on 53.5v and 535a.   Everything jn the coach sedms to ge working, 12v lights, fridge, 10ac plugs etc.  This is only from 20amps of shore power.   The batteries are not hot and there is no odors or anything else unusual.  Is it possible that the system is functioning and that the high v and a readings are related to that lie e of equipment being faulty?

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44 minutes ago, Wrayj1 said:

Here is the latest as i see it.  I have probably not given proper names to things.  The EMS shows 20 amps incoming, and power to the water heater, the washer/dryer, and front and rear ac's.  The power light is green as well as the chargee abd inverter lights, no fault indicated.  However the read out for v and a zre steady on 53.5v and 535a.   Everything jn the coach sedms to ge working, 12v lights, fridge, 10ac plugs etc.  This is only from 20amps of shore power.   The batteries are not hot and there is no odors or anything else unusual.  Is it possible that the system is functioning and that the high v and a readings are related to that lie e of equipment being faulty?

OK….here is what myself and Frank McElroy concluded. Without the requested pictures….it seems like you do have the right batteries….otherwise you would have blown every light bulb…..so…with that disclaimer….

 You MAY or Probably do have a bad Magnum Remote…..OR, something is messed up in the setup of the remote.  This remote will work on 48 VDC systems.  No one has any experience setting it up WRONG for 48 volts….it should be 12.    We REALLY NEED pictures of the top of the battery bank, they brand and info on one battery and the Magnum remote.  The 53 Volt reading is a total mystery.  It is impossible to assist you with trouble shooting the Magnum and Remote here….as you need step by step instructions on a phone call.  This is our advice…..if it DOES NOT make the remote reading back to NORMAL, then call Magnum at 425-353-8833.  Tech support will assist you and walk you through the trouble shooting.

DO YOU HAVE A VOLT METER?  If so, use it in the following.  If NOT, do this anyway.  BUT SEND US or text me the pictures….as well as the voltage reading on the batteries.

Disconnect SHORE power.  Go to the Magnum inverter.   There are 3 phone cables. Maybe on the back on yours if it is Black or on the front if White.  The second up from the bottom will be BLUE and that is the REMOTE..  There is a legend or markings that says what each is.   Use tape and write the color of each port .  Remove all three.  

Then on the side, push in the pin or plastic circuit breaker buttons.  Push hard to seat.  NOW….start the Generator and let it RUN for 5 minutes.

Go BACK to the Magnum Inverter.  Locate the POWER switch…usually right lower corner on the front…if white and the phone lines on the front,  it varies from model to model.  If your phone lines are on the back…where the battery cables are….it is the button above the phone jacks,

PUSH AND HOLD power button for 20 seconds.  There may be flashing lights or such….wait about a minute.  Then push and count to 2 and release the power button…like you would do an elevator call button,  THAT turns it on.  Got a Volt Meter….measure the large Negative to large Positive cables.  Should be 13.2 or higher but not above 14.2 volts.  That means the Magnum is charging.  

NOW…..plug in the remote.  Go into the MH. You might have to push the two ON  buttons on the lower left.  The two LED’s in the upper left corner should be GREEN and ON.  What does the Remote read?  If it is not in the 13.2 -14.2 or so range…then you probably have a defective remote…Possibly a bad setup?   BUT.  This is impossible to trouble shoot here.  When you did the SOFT reset with the Genny running, the Magnum had NO remote….and it set the internal settings to DEFAULT….which is 12 VDC a and correct for your MH….assuming you DO have FOUR 6 volt batteries.  If it still reads funky, call Magnum.  They will walk you through the trouble shooting and also how to set up the remote.  That is impossible here…

If they conclude it is a bad remote….then the ME-RC remote is what you need.  Amazon has them.  You DISCONNECT both HOUSE battery cables.  You remove the 4 screws holding on the remote…  plug it in,,.it is a phone cable,  make sure all the other cables are connected as they were before.  Reconnect the battery cables.  START the GENNY….you need power for this.  Repeat the Hold IN the power button and follow the steps above….all should be well.

Do what Magnum says…..Let us KNOW….good luck.

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Tom,  i can't thank you and everyone enough for your help and concern, i'm cluesless with this stuff.  With that said would you be willing to give me a phone number so i can text photos to you ?

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3 hours ago, Wrayj1 said:

Here is the latest as i see it.  I have probably not given proper names to things.  The EMS shows 20 amps incoming, and power to the water heater, the washer/dryer, and front and rear ac's.  The power light is green as well as the chargee abd inverter lights, no fault indicated.  However the read out for v and a zre steady on 53.5v and 535a.   Everything jn the coach sedms to ge working, 12v lights, fridge, 10ac plugs etc.  This is only from 20amps of shore power.   The batteries are not hot and there is no odors or anything else unusual.  Is it possible that the system is functioning and that the high v and a readings are related to that lie e of equipment being faulty?

                                 *****************  From another site i am on.***********************
Thought this is something you may like.
You may want to PRINT IT.
New-ish to RVing? If so, you’re likely confused by all the terms that go
along with it. Not to worry. Whether you’re new to the motorhome lifestyle
or a seasoned veteran, it never hurts to brush up on some of the most
common phrases used while RVing. Read through this glossary of RV lingo,
and you’ll be spouting off like an RV veteran in no time. It doesn’t
include everything you may hear (including foul expletives) but it’s a good
start.

*12-volt DC *The basic, battery-supported wiring system. Most motorhomes
have two 12-volt direct current (DC) systems; the chassis system and the
coach (or house) system. Direct current is used to provide power for most,
or all, of the lighting in the motorhome, as well as appliance circuit
boards, radios, heater, etc.

*120-volt AC* The household electrical system. Alternating current (AC) is
used to provide power to motors, heating elements, receptacles, etc. It
also provides power to the charging system for topping off the batteries.

*30-amp/50-amp* The type of AC electrical service in an RV. 30-amp service
is adequate for running one air conditioner, which is why it is normally
found in smaller motorhomes. The 50-amp service is for the big boys,
capable of cranking up two or more A/C units, plus the other amenities
commonly found in luxury coaches. The 30-amp plug has three blades, and the
50-amp version has four.

*A/C *Abbreviation for air conditioner.

*Air bags/air springs* Air bag suspension systems improve ride and
handling, and are adjustable, often on the go.

*Axle ratio* The axle or gear ratio refers to the size and design of the
differential gears. It’s the correlation of turns of the driveshaft with
the turns of the axle. So, a 4.10:1 gear ratio means that the driveshaft
turns 4.1 times for every 1 revolution of the axle.

*B-plus motorhome* Technically, B-plus motorhomes don’t exist; they’re
built on a cutaway chassis, and are therefore Class C’s. The RV industry
uses this term to suggest that a compact motorhome has more space than the
average Class B.

*Ball mount* The part of the hitch that the ball attaches to and is
inserted into a receiver mounted to the vehicle. Sometimes known as a
drawbar.

*Basement* Basement-style motorhomes have a raised-rail chassis that allows
the manufacturer to build large, pass-through storage compartments
underneath.

*Baseplate* Bolts to the frame at the front of a dinghy vehicle, providing
attachment points for the tow bar.

*Black tank/gray tank/fresh tank* The three main holding tanks in any RV.
Black is for the stinky stuff, gray is for shower/sink water and fresh is
for drinking/showering/ washing dishes.

*Black streaks* The hard-to-remove streaks that tend to run down the side
of any RV that’s stored outdoors.

*Boondocking/ dry camping* Camping remotely without hookups.

*Btu* British thermal unit is an international measure of energy that is
used to describe the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1
pound of water by 1 degree. Also used to measure the amount of heat that an
A/C unit can remove from a room (based on square footage) per hour.

*Cabover* The section of a Class C that extends over the cab and is usually
a sleeping area or entertainment center.

*Cap* The glossy fiberglass front or rear part of an RV’s body structure.

*Chassis battery/house battery* The chassis battery is required to start
the engine and perform other chassis-related functions, while the house
battery (or batteries) runs everything in the living quarters.

*Class A* Generally the largest motorhomes; most often built on a stripped
chassis.

*Class B* The most compact motorhome; it’s built inside a commercial cargo
van.

*Class C* Built on a cutaway chassis, maintaining the cab and doors of the
van or truck. Bodies often have a front cabover that can be used for
sleeping, entertainment components and/or storage.

*CCC *Cargo Carrying Capacity. The measure of how much stuff you can load
in the motorhome. Calculated by subtracting the actual weight (fuel tank
and LP-gas full, no supplies or passengers) from its gross vehicle weight
rating (see GVWR). Whatever’s left is the CCC. For motorhome tests, we use
our own formula, Realistic Occupant and Cargo Carrying Capacity (ROCCC),
which is the weight of a motorhome with full water and no passengers.

*Converter/charger* This device converts 120-volt AC or household current
to 12 volts DC for use in an RV. It also charges the house batteries.

*DEF* Diesel Exhaust Fluid. In modern diesels, the engine exhaust passes
through a catalyst that uses urea to assist in re-burning exhaust
particulate.

*Delamination* When laminated layers of fiberglass (used to build exterior
walls) start to bubble or separate. Usually caused by water leaks or
failure of the adhesive used to assemble components.

*Demand pump (or water pump)* RV water pumps are self-priming, and draw
water from a freshwater tank and distribute it through the freshwater
system.

*Diesel pusher* A rear-engine, diesel-powered motorhome.

*Dinghy* A vehicle that is towed behind a motorhome with all four wheels on
the ground. Some folks call it a “toad.”

*Dinghy brake* The separate braking system installed in the dinghy that
applies its brakes whenever the motorhome’s brakes are applied.

*Doghouse* The “hump” that covers the engine inside the cab or living area
of a Class A or Class C, although many technicians refer to this access
point in a Class C as an engine cover or engine access cover.

*Drop hitch* A draw bar that is used to drop the ball mount lower or higher
several inches when inserted in the receiver to compensate for the
difference in height between the tow vehicle and trailer.

*Drop receiver* Used to change the hitch receiver height (up or down) to
allow the tow bar to ride level when connected to a dinghy.

*DSI* Not a popular crime show. It stands for “Direct Spark Ignition,”
meaning the water heater can be lit by a switch inside the RV.

*Dually* A truck with two rear wheels/tires per side, or four total. The
extra tires help increase the load carrying capacity, and also improve
stability when towing heavy loads. Plus, they look cool.

*Engine brake* Also known as a Jacobs Engine Brake or Jake Brake, this
engine-mounted device controls the exhaust valves on a diesel engine, which
forces the engine to slow the vehicle.

*EPDM* Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer rubber. Commonly used for RV and
commercial roofing membranes, and is largely being replaced by TPO and PVC.

*Exhaust brake* Like an engine brake except that it works by closing off
the flow of exhaust, causing high backpressure in the manifold and the
cylinders. Less effective than a Jake Brake, it still works to help slow
the vehicle.

*Four down* A way of distinguishing how a vehicle is towed in dinghy towing
parlance. “Can this car be towed four down?” It means no trailer or tow
dolly is required to safely tow the vehicle behind a motorhome.

*Freshwater gravity fill* A fitting, usually on the side of a motorhome (if
so equipped) connected to a 1¼-inch tube that feeds directly to the
freshwater tank. This allows the tank to be filled by either a hose or a
portable tank. A small breather tube is usually also connected, which
allows air to escape while filling.

*Full-body paint* A multi-layer paint applied to the whole exterior,
instead of colored or white fiberglass or gelcoat with vinyl appliques to
add design to the exterior.

*GAWR* Gross Axle Weight Rating. The maximum allowable weight the axle is
designed to carry, including the weight of the axle.

*GCWR *Gross Combined (or Combination) Weight Rating. The maximum allowable
weight for the motorhome and a trailer or dinghy, including passengers and
cargo.

*Gelcoat *The visible, smooth, hard exterior surface of a fiberglass panel.

*Genset* Short for generator.

*GVWR* Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. The maximum amount the motorhome
chassis can weigh.

*Heated/enclosed underbelly* A motorhome with the holding tanks covered and
insulated to provide RV extended-season functionality. Heat from the
furnace is routed into the holding-tank areas to help prevent tanks and
plumbing from freezing.

*Hookups* Electrical, water, sewer, cable. An RV park or campground that
has all of these is said to have “full hookups.” Those with no sewer are a
“partial hookup.”

*Inverter *Takes the 12-volt DC power from batteries and turns it into
120-volt AC current to power household items like residential
refrigerators. Much like a converter, inverters with charging provisions
will keep the house batteries conditioned when plugged in to shorepower or
while using the generator. There are Modified Sine Wave (MSW) and Pure Sine
Wave (PSW) inverters. Running electronics? You need a PSW.

*kW* Kilowatt. It’s a measure of power that those of us in the RV world use
to size up generators. One kW equals 1,000 watts.

*Leveling jacks* These help level the motorhome on uneven ground. RV
systems can be electric or hydraulic, and have from three to six jacks,
depending on the RV. Not to be confused with stabilizing jacks, which are
commonly used on small motorhomes and are designed to reduce body movement
but can’t be used for leveling.

*Load range* The amount of weight a tire is designed to carry at its
specified inflation pressure.

*LP-gas/propane* Liquefied petroleum gas. Propane is the form of LP-gas
used to run gas appliances in a motorhome.

*Payload* The amount of weight a motorhome chassis is designed to carry,
including body, passengers and cargo. Payload is the GVWR minus its
unloaded curb weight (see UVW/UCW).

*PB* Polybutylene piping is what you’ll find in most older RVs and is gray
in color.

*PEX* PEX piping, or crosslinked polyethylene, is used in every RV today.
It is easy to install and repair and is also freeze-resistant. (Tip: PEX
and PB fittings are not interchangeable. )

*Pull-through site* A campsite between two roads in a campground that
allows an RVer to access the site without having to back up.

*PVC* Poly Vinyl Chloride. Used in a number of products, including
drainpipe and roof membranes.

*Receiver* The hardware mounted to the frame at the back of a motorhome or
vehicle that the hitch draw bar slides into. More commonly referred to as a
“hitch receiver.”

*Roof air conditioning* Most RV house air conditioning systems are
roof-mounted, run on 120-volt AC, and discharge cooled air through a duct
system or through a direct discharge plenum.

*SCWR *Sleeping Capacity Weight Rating. The RV manufacturer’s designated
number of sleeping positions multiplied by 154 pounds, which is the federal
standard average occupant weight used when calculating payload or other
weight ratings for motor vehicles. For example, if the rig is designed to
sleep four, the SCWR would be? Come on … you took math (it’s 616 pounds).

*Shorepower *What you plug into at an RV park or campground. The expression
“shorepower” comes from the boating industry, but since RVs are always on
land and are not amphibious, we don’t have a shore and … OK.. You get it.

*Slide topper* An awning that covers the roof of a slideout box to keep
debris off it and shed excess rainwater. The awning extends and retracts
with the slideout box.

*Slideout* Also called a “slide.” These are room extensions that extend and
retract from the main structure, providing more living space when parked.

*SRW/DRW* Single Rear Wheel/Dual Rear Wheel. Used to express the difference
between a truck with single rear wheels and one with dual rear wheels
(dually).

*Tag axle* That extra, or third, axle behind the rear axle of a motorhome.
Used on large diesel-pushers, the tag axle is necessary to carry additional
weight. Some tag axles are “steerable,” in that they steer as you turn the
coach; others must be retracted to prevent them from skidding in tight
turns as the rear of the coach pivots.

*Tail swing* Many RVs have axles far forward of the rear-most point of the
vehicle to improve the turning radius. This results in the rear of the
motorhome swinging in a wide arc when making a sharp turn, which can result
in a collision with another object.

*Torque* Measurement of twisting force. With RVs, it relates to the
powertrain’s ability to pull a load and is measured in pound-feet (lb-ft).

*Tow bar* Used to connect a dinghy vehicle for towing behind a motorhome.

*Tow rating* The manufacturer’s stated maximum weight a vehicle is designed
to tow.

*TPO* Thermoplastic Polyolefin is a single-ply roofing membrane that some
manufacturers use as an alternative to EPDM rubber.

*UVW/UCW* Unloaded Vehicle (or Curb) Weight. The weight of a vehicle as
built by the manufacturer, including all motor fuels and liquids, and all
accessories attached by the manufacturer.

*Wheelbase* Distance between the steering and drive axles of a motor
vehicle.
 
 
 

 
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SUCCESS!

Executive Summary.  The MH has the correct bank of four 6 VDC Interstate batteries, all configured properly.  YES, the Magnum meter was reading funky.  I got the pictures below.  Killed shore as I did not trust the 15 amp setup.  Started Generator.  The Magnum remote was NOT or showing ON.  Pushed the power and charger buttons.  Green light at top and all lights ON.  Still reading excessive volts and amperage.  Had Ray check 30 amp breaker….since green ON were lighted….confirmed incoming power.

then, decided to check setup.  Was basically the default settings.  Had learned from the ME-RC manual that the remote “KNOWS” the voltage….and there are different screens displayed for the each particular voltage or model number. SO, it can not be mistakenly set up for wrong inverter voltage.  Reset the parameters to what most of us use….I am conservative and don’t push mine over 80% charge rate.

Went to inverter.  Pulled all three phone lines, which were labeled.  Black case so on the side with the power in and out.  Pushed (with Genny running) the power button for 20 second.  Then, let the Magnum sit for a minute or so.  Plugged in the remote ONLY.  Pushed power button and the LED started to randomly flash.  Went upstairs.  All was well.  Green lights.  13.x VDC and “full charge”.  

Ray had done a “reset” from the remote….not the full, from the inverter, reset.  My only comment is when a procedure is given….understand it and follow the instructions.  Most that post technical info have read or understand.  Had that been done, then all concerns or issues would probably not have happened.

Frank and I discussed the crazy readings.  My only comment from having a defective or intermittent remote….they behave stranger than the lovely women we might know or cohabitate with ….and they will change.  Mine first would not switch from shore to inverting….even with search OFF.  Then it would “loose” its setup….maybe an hour or a day later.  Then, it would NOT let me finish the setup…would go so far…then locked up.  Would display the setting name..but not respond when pushing into charge.  Lastly, it lost the last few screens of the Tech menu.

Ray monitor and see what happens.  Next thing would have been the HARD (disconnect everything….wait a full hour…not 5 minutes) HARD RESET…

That’s about it…..
 

 

257F63B9-FAAD-4A6C-B3BC-B0AC5CB9E8DF.jpeg

F8D89B50-74B8-4E73-A519-4E25EDC4CAD7.jpeg

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Much thanks and gratitude to Tom Cherry who called me and talked me through resetting my remote/system.  The system is now working as it should.   We will be selling our coach in a few months and I will inform the new owner that my best guft to him will be access to this forum.  The wealth of knowledge here is immeasurable.  Thanks again Tom.

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Phew, that 85,000 watts were impossible as calculated on the screen so I knew something was amiss. So glad Tom walked you through it.

It is so much easier to take time over the phone so one can play the "20 questions" game. Trying to do it in written form is frustratingly slow.

Sometimes there is just a loose nut on the end of the steering wheel, or in my case the old microphone. 

There was no reason for that readout, just policy. Ghosts float freely through all of the RV's I have ever owned. 

There is a great video available on the Magnum panel setup. Might be in the files somewhere here. 

 

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UPDATE.  Magnum said….”weird things and readings”.  BTS (Battery Temperature Sensor” is shorted out.  Soft Reset will sometimes clear it up….but long range….replace or discontinue use….

Unplug….should be good to go.  M&M RV Electronics also said that they, in 2015 at our February Gathering, routinely UNPLUG the BTS as they have had more issues of “funky” Magnums….up to and including some repair or damage issues.  They do NOT recommend keeping it plugged in.

That’s what the Magnum tech said….and I have talked to this guy before and he remembered me.  
 

EDIT…..FURTHER UPDATE.  Magnum manual, or at lease the post I saw says to SPECIFICALLY a remove the POSITIVE first….not the Negative.  Can cause issues.  Need to know is GOOD as we often tell folks to pull power… assume….but do not know…so, why risk it…..if Magnum was turned OFF. So my rule of thumb will be….Positive OFF…then Negative….reconnect negative….then positive.  From the manual….have not chased down and reviewed personally….but sounds reasonable.

EDIT FROM Frank.  KEY PHRASE…..”FROM THE INVERTER”.  This makes more sense.  OK….after digging into the Hard Reset procedure, Magnum DOES say Positive first and warns about having negative connected…then restoring power to Positive on Magnum.

Bottom line.  Follow the procedures. 

CAUTION: To remove battery power from the inverter, disconnect the battery positive connection before the negative connection. This requirement can prevent damage to the inverter and/or an accessory connected to the inverter.Note: When an accessory that is not powered by the inverter (e.g., ME-AGS-N and ME-BMK) is installed and connected to the inverter (via a network communication cable), the battery negative connection of the inverter and each accessory must be at the same potential (i.e., electrically common with each other) until the positive connection of each device is removed. This prevents a high impedance path developing between the connected devices (i.e., inverter and accessories), which can cause the network cable to become the DC return path to the battery—possibly resulting in permanent damage to all connected devices on the network. This can be prevented if the battery negative connection of each device is always connected before connecting/disconnecting any battery positive.

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11 minutes ago, myrontruex said:

Makes a lot of sense. The magnum is looking for a ground when the negative wire is lifted. Since there are other possible grounds it can attempt to use there could be ground traces smoked in many places. 

 

Frank analyzed it like you did.  I guess that pulling the negative off the battery MIGHT (probably is) safe....but now I do wonder. I and another person have "lost" or smoked the Magnum AGS.  Mine was the old model (knobs) and his was the newer -N model. So, I will exercise caution and pull the positive first.  

Now this DOES bring up another question.  When exercising the batteries, Magnum suggests "Removing the power" and letting them stabilize for a few minutes....otherwise you have to let them sit for at least an hour or two.....  The usual trick is to remove the "Jumpers" between each set.  I guess that would not be an issue.... Frank may chime in here.  Might be MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING....be we seem to have more electrical and Magnum issues lately.  I have assisted with at least 5 in the past few months.  One was a total Inverter failure....no resetting or whatever.  The other finally took a Hard Reset....and then this one.  There were also others.  With the age of the inverters and Magnum saying that the PCB are typically not good for more than 5 - 8 years....it does give one cause to pause and think.

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I have never done much about exercising batteries. After any charge of course there will be a higher surface voltage that can be drained off or just let them sit without the charger on.

I do not like to take battery cables off any more than necessary. Those things can be so dangerous just from a simple spark, especially after a charge or poor ventilation. Or dropping a HOT wire onto the frame or other place can be an absolute disaster in seconds. 

I like to use specific gravity and voltage as well as maintaining water levels for general maintenance. Any batteries the seem to be using water more than another is a cause for concern and candidate for replacement.

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51 minutes ago, myrontruex said:

I have never done much about exercising batteries. After any charge of course there will be a higher surface voltage that can be drained off or just let them sit without the charger on.

I do not like to take battery cables off any more than necessary. Those things can be so dangerous just from a simple spark, especially after a charge or poor ventilation. Or dropping a HOT wire onto the frame or other place can be an absolute disaster in seconds. 

I like to use specific gravity and voltage as well as maintaining water levels for general maintenance. Any batteries the seem to be using water more than another is a cause for concern and candidate for replacement.

I would suggest a one time test.  The procedure is simple.  I have a specific gravity meter that has real numbers….as well as a “DI” calibration or check.  Was cheap on Amazon.  It has a fill to line and you keep it level.  Gives real SG readings….not the colors.

I measured the distance between the plates and the bottom of the fill well.  Dropped in a .dowel.  Then either marked the bottom or measured down from the top of the short dowel to the battery case top or any reference line.  Then put the dowel into the fill well….but let it rest on the lower lip or bottom of the well.  Subtract and divide by 2.  Add 1/16” to that dimension.  Measure up from the tip of dowel.  Mark it.  Then a took a knife and cut a small grooved all the way around the circumference..  I have a DIP STICK.

fully charged batteries.  Pull the jumpers.  Wait about 20 minutes.  Misuse individual voltages.  Check SG of each cell.  Write them down.  Use a 350 - 450 watt device.  A quartz halogen work light is good.  Plug it in.  Check the voltage at the battery terminals every 15 minutes.  I sometimes just check the individual batteries. When you get to 11.9 / 12.0 VDC.  Read the Magnum remote.  Typically will be 0.10 - 0.15 lower.  That means it is safe to run down good batteries to 11.8 on Magnum.

unplug load.  Pull jumpers.  Let batteries sit for 10 minutes.  They WILL recover and stabilize.  Look at the Trojan or other charts.  Compare the average SG and voltage.  That is the State of charge.  Record all info of course.  Then charge back up.  Repeat the volt and SG tests.  Odds are….less variation in the SG.  You will be able to spot a bad or weak cell.

Might take 3 cycles.  If your bank is consistent and above 90 SOC after the final drawdown and recharge,,,..good to go.  Past that….judgement call on how much you need or use them.

This is basically the same procedure Trojan outlines.

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4 hours ago, Tom Cherry said:

Frank analyzed it like you did.  I guess that pulling the negative off the battery MIGHT (probably is) safe....but now I do wonder. I and another person have "lost" or smoked the Magnum AGS.  Mine was the old model (knobs) and his was the newer -N model. So, I will exercise caution and pull the positive first.  

Now this DOES bring up another question.  When exercising the batteries, Magnum suggests "Removing the power" and letting them stabilize for a few minutes....otherwise you have to let them sit for at least an hour or two.....  The usual trick is to remove the "Jumpers" between each set.  I guess that would not be an issue.... Frank may chime in here.  Might be MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING....be we seem to have more electrical and Magnum issues lately.  I have assisted with at least 5 in the past few months.  One was a total Inverter failure....no resetting or whatever.  The other finally took a Hard Reset....and then this one.  There were also others.  With the age of the inverters and Magnum saying that the PCB are typically not good for more than 5 - 8 years....it does give one cause to pause and think.

The Magnum warning to remove the positive connection first in reality is to prevent a direct path from battery positive at the inverter and battery ground through the AGS or BMK accessories. 

So, IF you were to remove the negative cable AT THE INVERTER BOX first, you could then have a situation where battery power still flows through the inverter and back to ground through the AGS or BMK modules that are still connected to battery ground.

Now, if you disconnect the 6 volt house battery jumpers you are in effect removing BOTH positive AND negative cables at the same time.  There would be no current path through the batteries for the inverter or ANY of the independently connected modules.

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19 hours ago, Frank McElroy said:

The Magnum warning to remove the positive connection first in reality is to prevent a direct path from battery positive at the inverter and battery ground through the AGS or BMK accessories. 

So, IF you were to remove the negative cable AT THE INVERTER BOX first, you could then have a situation where battery power still flows through the inverter and back to ground through the AGS or BMK modules that are still connected to battery ground.

Now, if you disconnect the 6 volt house battery jumpers you are in effect removing BOTH positive AND negative cables at the same time.  There would be no current path through the batteries for the inverter or ANY of the independently connected modules.

Just wanted to understand this procedure correctly. This caution and warning you are talking is about the Inverter cables and NOT the house battery cables, correct?

I have always removed the house negative battery cable FIRST when changing out batteries on any vehicle or coach.

If working just on the Inverter, you MUST remove the positive cable first, then the negative cable.

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