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Rear radiator removal


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I have a 2001 Endeavor RR8R Cummins ISC 8.3 330 HP. Does anyone know how to go about removing the CAC and radiator to get to the engine for a good inspection and cleaning?

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5 minutes ago, Stewart Grady said:

I have a 2001 Endeavor RR8R Cummins ISC 8.3 330 HP. Does anyone know how to go about removing the CAC and radiator to get to the engine for a good inspection and cleaning?

It’s on my list as I need to replace my AC pump and will be fixing a caps pump leak. 
 

I have not seen anyone anywhere post pics or videos. I’m just going to drain it and start pulling it apart. It doesn’t look complicated, just time consuming. I’ve already done a few hoses, and they were pita to get off. 

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I would do a degrease / light power washing of the parts, let them air dry and then drain the antifreeze.

Then unbolt and remove.  Put a jack under the radiator as it can be heavy.  Then gently drop the jack and slide the radiator out.

I would count on replacing the hoses and clamps so pre-order them.  Consider replacing all the belts too.

Get the right antifreeze for your system and have that on hand to refill.

Power wash the parts / motor when apart.

Full inspection of everything.

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I am not sure if you will run into this or not, but on my father's 99 Diplomat (ISB) the radiator would not come out the rear without trimming the fiberglass slightly.  I assume they originally sat the cap around it, or brought in from below, but it would not come out.  It wasn't monumental, but there was indeed some trimming that had to be done that didn't affect the structural rigidity in my opinion.  I can't recall because this was several years ago, but I may have put some of it back in place.  But I can tell you, if you have ever had oil leaks that made it's way to the radiator, it certainly was helpful to get the radiator out and the shroud off and clean it 100%.  

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What i know, if your planning on removing your radiator then “if its original” plan on replacing it. If its the aluminum version it was no longer avaiable when i did mine last year… they said the electrolisis is was killed them. So i used the source in oregon an he had one built for me, if your serious an gonna do this then we need to talk cause i wrote it out an it took FOREVER!!! I got pics an info, im on the west coast so all my info an sources are out this way…

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13 hours ago, Stewart Grady said:

I have a 2001 Endeavor RR8R Cummins ISC 8.3 330 HP. Does anyone know how to go about removing the CAC and radiator to get to the engine for a good inspection and cleaning?

I replaced  my complete Radiator ass'y plus several engine parts a couple years ago on my 07 Ambassador RR8R chassis, be glad to talk to you  and walk you through it , I have lots of pictures, contact me at Glang11082@yahoo.com if interested. 

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11 hours ago, Rikadoo said:

What i know, if your planning on removing your radiator then “if its original” plan on replacing it. If its the aluminum version it was no longer avaiable when i did mine last year… they said the electrolisis is was killed them. So i used the source in oregon an he had one built for me, if your serious an gonna do this then we need to talk cause i wrote it out an it took FOREVER!!! I got pics an info, im on the west coast so all my info an sources are out this way…

I am also interested in the info you have on replacing radiator on my 2004 Monico Dynasty. any pic and files of what you did would be greatly appreciated..

Michael Powell

mpowell@powellwatson.com 

Thanks

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My radiator had started leaking shortly after I purchased it, I chose NOT to use any sealing compounds mixed with the coolant to try to seal it as with a diesel I feared restricting the oil cooler, as well as the heater core. I was trying to be pro-active in getting my hands on the new radiator BEFORE I remove it however I was told there is a "TAG" on the side tank that had the information required to have one built to spec yet I was unable to find it. Funny story it was not till after I had completed the entire installation when I was reconnecting a CAC tube did I find the "TAG", I found it on the fan shroud on the top left of the fan shroud, covered in years of dirt. So there were things I wanted to do while I had the radiator out, T-stat, hoses, water pump, fan (it had a piece missing) and anything else as long as I had the access. So not having the tag to order from I reached out to  Source Engineering 458-207-9442 and spoke with Jim he had told me once I have it out that I will just need a couple measurements and he can go from there. Jim also told me that the "original design" was no longer available due to the "original" was all aluminum and that was the reason of failure due to the electrolysis, so now they build one that has steel side tanks with a replaceable core in the middle, also due to the slight design change that the shroud will need a couple "slight modifications". Now as for the removal my Radiator and CAC have two separate mounting areas, and I did NOT remove the CAC, however I did remove the transmission cooler. The rear for lack of a better term "Bumper" center section comes apart in the middle so there were 4 nut / bolts and a few screws that I removed and that gave me 98% access to the removal the remaining fitment came from pulling of one of the edges of the "bumper" that remained. I then removed the beauty ring between the radiator and the rear cap, I disconnected the engine heater 110vac receptical and let the wires hang (note: shut off the breaker 1st) So now is when I drained the cooling system using the petcock on the radiator (side note the new radiator DOES NOT have a petcock nor does it have provisions for one) Now to the hoses, first if this is the original go in and cut as many of the tie straps you can find, that getting access to some of the clamps can become daunting, also I used a angle pointed tool to break the seal between the hose nipple and the hose, some of the hoses I couldn't get that into I just had to use force, this is where have different size extensions and ratchet combinations comes in handy to get to the clamps. There is a small 1/2 in hose that reaches from the surge tank to the top of the radiator that once you start to pull the radiator out just cut it off cause it cannot be reused anyway. So like said before remove the transmission cooler I believe were 1 1/4 wrench size, then 3 bolts (mine were torx head) between the CAC and the radiator with rubber grommets come out(I wedged a screwdriver between them to separate the two pieces) then 3 bolts on both sides of the radiator, its here you can see its ready to come out. (it was here I was getting tired of the up/down and crawling around) So you WILL need a capable helper I believe the unit weighs 75 or 85 lbs, because of the shroud and the hose nipples you pull straight back and once clear you can rest it on the trailer hitch. From there one will have to angle the radiator while the other pulls the cap opening enough to get one side free, once free both of you can now set the radiator on the ground.

ON my MH this now gave me access to midway section of the fan and engine, so there are 4 bolts on the back of the fan shroud, remove them and the finger guard comes off, from there I removed the belts, fan, water pump. However tempting to remove the shroud its not worth it as the hole for the fan gives you plenty of access to mostly everything, including the thermostat, you just need to be flexible. If you are replacing the Water pump and T-stat take you ESN# off your data plate to ensure you get the proper parts for your application, ( when I got the new water pump it was Soooo different from the old one I took it back to have them get me the right one, in fact due to multiple updates of the pump it was in fact the right one)

Its here things that you can see the reason your gonna spend a few more $$ cause of the access of so many other componits, I removed the Alternator even though it was working flawless it is 18 years old so I found a rebuilder that "freshened" it up (bearing, brushes, regulator) NOTE: mark the wires and TAKE PICTURES of wire location... I replaced the tensioner which was probably the biggest part of the whole repair, due to finding the replacement, there are sooooo Many slight differences it took more time than anything else. When I was doing all this I was gleaning information from several members on this site and others that gave me some cool tips. Like on the fan shroud use you die grinder to cut a hole big enough for your hand to fit thru so you can clean between the finger guard and the radiator later as needed, once you cut the hole now cut a piece of sheet metal to cover it and drill a couple holes for screws to hold it in place. The other tip was to remove both heater hoses from the block, cut off 1 to 2 feet of the old hoses then go purchase new Silicone hose to replace it (don't forget the special clamps for silicone hose) then go buy 2 ball valves with the appropriate hose size nipples for the hose your using, connect the new hose to the block nipples and now where the new and old hose come together insert the ball valves, then tie strap the valves so they don't move around. (This is for 2 reasons, one so you don't have to replace 60 ft of heater hose as they are buried the length of the coach but ALSO in case you have a heater core failure you can turn off the flow to it and continue your journey until time for its repair) I also because of access replaced the block heater AND the cord to it, my cord was melted and heater was not working. My fan blade had a piece missing, again Jim from Source sells a nice upgraded fan that helps with MPG, however because of Covid he didn't have any in stock, he did have some older previously removed fans, he gave me one free of charge, all I had to do was pay shipping. Before I go on to the installation I will add one more thing, the 2 little purge hoses coming out of the surge tank, one goes to the T-stat housing the other attached to the radiator, I found the truck supply store (Fleetpride truck parts had the hose and the 2 new nipples that I had noooooo idea where I would find them, that when I installed them I smeared a little dielectric silicone inside the hose and it take a surprising amount of effort to install the little B&#ta#$s!) It should go without saying the radiator is the LAST item that needs to be installed due to limited access.

So now if you are replacing the radiator you will see the body is different in that where the New style tanks are you need to cut areas in the shroud to acomidate the new design, which my die grinder did well. I only had to do 1 removal to reshape one area for a good fit. *TIP: when replacing the upper and lower radiator hose with the radiator out apply liberal amounts of dielectric to both the hose nipple and inside of the hose so you can slide the hose onto the radiator BEFORE you install the radiator... ask me how I learned THAT trick...

The rest of the installation was easy,  I had left most hose clamps loose Until the radiator was in place so I could slide the new hoses into place, I cleaned as I went also due to some screws were either hiding or the hole didn't line up it helped having a supply of extras.

Supplies I used: anti sieze, blue loc-tite, scotch brite pads, painters blue tape (to protect painted areas from gouges and when cutting hose to make straight line) part cleaner spray, Plenty of tie straps different sizes (harbor freight), dielectric silicone and white pipe tape for new fittings, cut off wheels, saws all blades for metal, assortment of new nuts and bolts.

Parts replaced: Radiator, T-stat, water pump, radiator hoses (Napa), purge hoses and fittings, PLUS the hose from the bottom of the surge tank to the nipple of the lower cooling hose tube, both belts, tensioner, sicone heater hose with special clamps, two ball valves, new block heater with cord, belt tensioner, fan , Black spray paint (to paint the coolant tubes before reinstall), OAT coolant = Note: with the fleetgaurd coolant I used I no longer needed a coolant filter with DCA instead its just a filter with only a screen inside, you need to research the PN#, assorted nuts and bolts and screws and finally radiator pressure cap. 

Vendors: Napa, Fleetpride, cummins, Source engineering, Local alternator rebuilder, Local mobile septic pump out (I stayed in the coach while I worked in location)

Support: Budwiser, bourbon, crying towel, band-aides, a field large enough and well mowed to go retrieve parts and tools I had thrown!!! close proximity to a wall to kick...

Time: Do to my location and proximity to vendors plus waiting for due to covid 2 weeks.

TOOLS: I used mostly my battery operated impacts and ratchets (I used my 1/4 drive ratchet for the hose clamps, the majority was regular SAE sizes, very few metric, lady finger pry bars, sockets more than big wrenches 1 1/4 and such, screwdrivers with square tips due to type of factory fasteners, however with my new screws I used Phillips, side cutters, hose cutter AKA razor blades. Cut off grinder and or saws all, wire wheel/grinder for cleaning coolant tubes. and a voltmeter cause I had a wire crossed on the alternator, pointed tip hose nipple separators. One more tool I used that helped with not only refilling the cooling system it also allowed me to check for possibly any leaks BEFORE I put the coolant in was a cooling system evacuator. You put in place of the radiator cap, connect the device to air pressure ant it pulls the entire system into a vacuum, so once in a vacuum, you disconnect the air hose and watch the vacuum gauge for 10 minutes. If there is no loss of vacuum now you change the connector on the tool to draw the  50/50 mix in the system, this tool eliminates having to burp out air pockets that can be associated with the long runs to the heater core.

If you need any further information reach me at Rikadoo99@Yahoo.com

 

15 hours ago, Rikadoo said:

What i know, if your planning on removing your radiator then “if its original” plan on replacing it. If its the aluminum version it was no longer avaiable when i did mine last year… they said the electrolisis is was killed them. So i used the source in oregon an he had one built for me, if your serious an gonna do this then we need to talk cause i wrote it out an it took FOREVER!!! I got pics an info, im on the west coast so all my info an sources are out this way…

 

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Here's a tip for rear radiator ISB/ISC engines:

Pull the CAC. Make a couple of alignment studs with cheap hardware-store bolts, 1" longer than original bolts, cut off the head of your newly-purchased alignment bolts and saw a slot to put a flat screwdriver into (see pic). Allows leaving the belts and pulleys in place while removing and re-installing the fan.  Pull a bolt, install a stud, repeat. I made 3 studs, but 2 will work.  There is enough radiator clearance to pull the fan with the alignment studs in place.  IMG_2649.thumb.JPG.940af749c820377d92fa30786b8bf057.JPG

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