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Ca, Drivers licence


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I live in California and just discovered that in order to be legal I had to get a special license to drive my Class A MH. It was not because of length or the fact it had air brakes, it was because of its weight. California says you can use your class C license with a vehicle "up to 26k Lbs" anything over that amount a Non-Commercial class B license is required. my old gasser was under that so I was ok, however my 03 comes in at 32K lbs.

Now the Non-Commercial part was cake... however unless you recently had taken the class C with in the last 12 months you MUST take the C portion over again, BEFORE you can do the Class B. I will tell you this, it has been a while since I had actually taken the C portion and I found a lot of stuff that was different from I was younger. Also along with the B license they make you pass a DOT physical, which I was told to use a clinic for the physical rater than a regular Dr.

My DMV office was even confused as to if I in fact needed it until the discussion of the weight came about.

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I believe you my be legal if you are under 40 feet, but over the 26,000lb limit.  California publishes a recreational vehicle hand book that states what you can drive with class C non- commercial license.  Otherwise you will need a non- commercial class. B

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I did my 45’ Housecar Class B non-commercial license in (not so) beautiful Stockton, CA. after chillin’ with the homeless down by the river. One commenter was correct, the answer is, just move out of CA. 

Don Thames ‘05 HR Navigator 43PBQ


 

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1 hour ago, CorinthWest said:

I found a permanent solution to your specific problem........move out of California.

Been there, done that also. Even though I had a class A. There are more reason's than that to leave California.

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Rikadoo, not to beat a dead horse here, but.......I moved to Texas from California back in '98.  Got my Class A Commercial here so I could help the local school and work as a back-up bus driver.  I don't do that anymore, so last year I TRADED my Class A for a NON-COMMERCIAL Class B.  It was just a pit stop at the DMV (with no waiting whatsoever - in and out).  I think they even used the same photo.  No more physicals, no more commercial insurance, no more rules and regs.  Texas, the best move I ever made in my life.  Love it here. 

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You decided to upgrade to your current motor home.  Since it is a larger or heaver coach, you need to obtain a new drivers license.  The California laws are what they are to protect fellow vehicle drivers.  Either meet the requirements or purchase a coach that allows you to use your current license.

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2 hours ago, Chuck B 2004 Windsor said:

You decided to upgrade to your current motor home.  Since it is a larger or heaver coach, you need to obtain a new drivers license.  The California laws are what they are to protect fellow vehicle drivers.  Either meet the requirements or purchase a coach that allows you to use your current license.

I think that’s what Rik is doing. 

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9 minutes ago, mmartinhouse said:

So, for people visiting the state of California which we did yearly till Covid, does this have any affect on us, as we have a 40 ft and wt is 38,000?

 

Should not. This is the whole “power of the states” thing that we keep hearing in the news. 
 

If that is the case, I want to tow a boat behind my 5th wheel like they do in Idaho, they get to go in any state towing a double set up as far as I know 

73F1A330-2D72-456B-A2A5-CD60D50E58D0.jpeg

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Just do not go into Oregon with that rig because they Will pull you over.  If your tow vehicle is Not rated for that tow, they will escort you to the closest weigh station.  If you are overweighed, you will have to park it and hire a tow vehicle to tow you back to the next state.  

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Technically, I think any state can enforce their own towing laws on any driver in their state.
Actually, I think enforcement is rare, though it could be a BIG problem if you're ever involved in an accident.

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5 hours ago, Chuck B 2004 Windsor said:

Just do not go into Oregon with that rig because they Will pull you over.  If your tow vehicle is Not rated for that tow, they will escort you to the closest weigh station.  If you are overweighed, you will have to park it and hire a tow vehicle to tow you back to the next state.  

Seen it here, Cali, Nevada, and Arizona. All from Idaho.

Last fall saw a Big Tiffin pulling an F150 that was pulling an UTV on a trailer.

But I got us off topic 

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20 hours ago, mmartinhouse said:

So, for people visiting the state of California which we did yearly till Covid, does this have any effect on us, as we have a 40 ft and wt. is 38,000?

Your driver's license requirements are for the state where it was issued. So as long as you have met the requirements of your domicile state you are good to drive the coach in any state in the US.

Towing is a completely different topic versus licensing requirements.

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