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Entry door


Steven

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The entry door opens easily from the inside but very difficult and hard to open from the outside. I must push in hard while pulling on handle to open from outside the motorhome.

I did have a tech try to adjust the 2 bolts on door frame to no avail. the u shaped striker upper and lower seem to line up with the bolts . The door closes perfectly but not opening without pushing in on the door just above the deadbolt key lock.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Steve.

2004 Monaco Windsor 40DST

 

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Mine was doing the same thing, getting progressively worse.  Ultimately I ended up getting locked out. 

I fixed by taking the inside panels off to gain access to the mechanism and adjusting the linkage inside the door.  Once I figured out which one to adjust it was a couple minute job but taking off and putting back on the inside panel took a couple hours. 

I believe there may be a writeup in the files section under "Doors and Latches"

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I have worked on mine a couple of times. There is a couple of adjusting options once you get into the door. Anyone with an eye for the mechanical operation can figure it out after getting inside the door. I first had the same problem you are having. I determined that the bushing (that is discussed in the write up in the files here) was not worn out and that led me to a “turnbuckle” that I was able to shorten. Making the mechanism much easier to open (from the outside). My wife and I joked that it was the best upgrade we had ever done to the coach. Contact me if you think I can help.

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This is an excellent depiction of what is necessary to make the adjustment. I have been having the same problem. Your detailed drawing mitigates my concern about tackling this job myself. Is this drawing from the user manual? If not, what other resource do you have for information? 

I have a 2007 HR Ambassador that needs added freon for the dash AC. Having watched some instructional you tubes (on a Winnebego RV) I assume the high and low pressure lines are mounted to the firewall. When I drop the front panel I see lots of stuff attached and a myriad of covered wires dissappearing into the firewall. I am unable to find a depiction of the firewall naming the various componenets attached to it. Any suggestions?

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We have had problems over the years similar to yours, where we had to push in the door "in", while pulling on the handle to open the entry door. I feel like sometimes the RV was not level and this is causing this issue. Other times I have lubricated the two mechanisms on the door that latch to the striker bolts. I eventually loosened the striker bolts, closed and opened the door, so that the striker bolts could adjust themselves, and tightened the striker bolts again, trying not to let them move as I tightened the nut on the end of the bolt. I found, at least for me, that I can not rally tighten the nut too much, or the striker bolt would move too much and the door was once again hard to open.

Hope this helps, it's a lot easier than opening up the guts of the locking mechanism.

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There is a easy instruction on how to adjust the entrance door outside handle in the group files.  IMO, the you tube instruction takes you around the block to get across the street.  To me, it's hard to understand and follow.  You can print the instructions to use while adjusting instead of trying to use the video.  

When you pull the outside handle, if the handle comes almost all the way out before the door open, you need to make the adjustment.  The door should open when the handle reaches about half the travel.  That is being proactive.  Good luck, Chuck B 2004 Windsor

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For those with door opening problems, you should be in great shape after downloading the instructions that have been posted in the FILES section by Chuck B, using the diagram posted above and the YouTube Video posted above regardless of whether you tackle the job yourself OR give all of this information to a "qualified" RV Service Tech who is familiar with these doors. It isn't that difficult.

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I have a 2007 HR Ambassador that needs added freon for the dash AC. Having watched some instructional you tubes (on a Winnebego RV) I assume the high and low pressure lines are mounted to the firewall. When I drop the front panel I see lots of stuff attached and a myriad of covered wires dissappearing into the firewall. I am unable to find a depiction of the firewall naming the various componenets attached to it. Any suggestions?

I just added R134A to my Dynasty using AC Pro product from the AutoZone. My low and high pressure ports are in the engine compartment near the compressor. I have a side radiator so that may be why they are back there. Easy to see the engine. The process was very easy. The fitting will only fit the low pressure side. I need to get another can. Buy the one with the better gauge. Cost was about $45.

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17 minutes ago, Chuck B said:

Nevada Rob, What does dash AC needing Freon has to do with adjusting the entrance door?  You need to start a new topic.  That makes it easier for those members who need to follow the topic.  Chuck B 2004 Windsor

Further up in the post hilrunr, Mr. Mark Fell asked the question about the A/C. I copied and pasted his question. I was attempting to offer him a suggestion and maybe I should have told him to stay with the class and not muddy the waters with a question within a question. I appreciate your input and I will make every effort with my limited capacities to do better in the future.

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1 hour ago, Chuck B said:

Nevada Rob, What does dash AC needing Freon has to do with adjusting the entrance door?  You need to start a new topic.  That makes it easier for those members who need to follow the topic.  Chuck B 2004 Windsor

Sorry, new to the forum. I was actually more interested in sourcing the diagram.

I understand your point  putting an off topic question in the discussion.

 

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Reading this thread about the door latch inspired me to open my door up this morning (we are in a campground 1200 miles from home, with limited tools.... )

My wife has not been able to open the door as it takes a special 'TUG' and only releases at the very end of outside handle travel.

Less than an hour later, I have a door that she can open easily, releasing the latches at about 1/2 travel of the outside handle.

I adjusted it at three places, the "turnbarrel" (which does not turn one way to shorten and the other to lengthen, but must take one end lose to add or subtract a turn)

The other two adjustments were at the upper and lower latches, just turning the nuts there to take out slack.

Another problem I have been having is that when I try to level my coach if I 'twist' it level with the rear jacks the door "jams" and I get "trapped" in the coach, the inside handle, pulls but the door will not push open.  Somewhere I read that the latch "studs" are supposed to move (up and down)... my upper one moves but the lower one was rock solid.... I got it freed up and now I need to test and see if the door opens now when I "twist" the chassis.   I believe they were designed to move slightly (about 3/16" total travel) to keep them from binding up on the latches with chassis flex.  I'll update when I have tried it.

Ken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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22 hours ago, hilrunr said:

This is an excellent depiction of what is necessary to make the adjustment. I have been having the same problem. Your detailed drawing mitigates my concern about tackling this job myself. Is this drawing from the user manual? If not, what other resource do you have for information? 

I have a 2007 HR Ambassador that needs added freon for the dash AC. Having watched some instructional you tubes (on a Winnebego RV) I assume the high and low pressure lines are mounted to the firewall. When I drop the front panel I see lots of stuff attached and a myriad of covered wires dissappearing into the firewall. I am unable to find a depiction of the firewall naming the various componenets attached to it. Any suggestions?

The drawing is from the attachment that was included with my original post.

7 hours ago, Cubflyer said:

Reading this thread about the door latch inspired me to open my door up this morning (we are in a campground 1200 miles from home, with limited tools.... )

My wife has not been able to open the door as it takes a special 'TUG' and only releases at the very end of outside handle travel.

Less than an hour later, I have a door that she can open easily, releasing the latches at about 1/2 travel of the outside handle.

I adjusted it at three places, the "turnbarrel" (which does not turn one way to shorten and the other to lengthen, but must take one end lose to add or subtract a turn)

The other two adjustments were at the upper and lower latches, just turning the nuts there to take out slack.

Another problem I have been having is that when I try to level my coach if I 'twist' it level with the rear jacks the door "jams" and I get "trapped" in the coach, the inside handle, pulls but the door will not push open.  Somewhere I read that the latch "studs" are supposed to move (up and down)... my upper one moves but the lower one was rock solid.... I got it freed up and now I need to test and see if the door opens now when I "twist" the chassis.   I believe they were designed to move slightly (about 3/16" total travel) to keep them from binding up on the latches with chassis flex.  I'll update when I have tried it.

Ken

You are correct about the “turnbuckle”. I figured that out too. I started to include that piece of information but didn’t want to over complicate things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Cubflyer said:

Reading this thread about the door latch inspired me to open my door up this morning (we are in a campground 1200 miles from home, with limited tools.... )

My wife has not been able to open the door as it takes a special 'TUG' and only releases at the very end of outside handle travel.

Less than an hour later, I have a door that she can open easily, releasing the latches at about 1/2 travel of the outside handle.

I adjusted it at three places, the "turnbarrel" (which does not turn one way to shorten and the other to lengthen, but must take one end lose to add or subtract a turn)

The other two adjustments were at the upper and lower latches, just turning the nuts there to take out slack.

Another problem I have been having is that when I try to level my coach if I 'twist' it level with the rear jacks the door "jams" and I get "trapped" in the coach, the inside handle, pulls but the door will not push open.  Somewhere I read that the latch "studs" are supposed to move (up and down)... my upper one moves but the lower one was rock solid.... I got it freed up and now I need to test and see if the door opens now when I "twist" the chassis.   I believe they were designed to move slightly (about 3/16" total travel) to keep them from binding up on the latches with chassis flex.  I'll update when I have tried it.

Ken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You should never "twist" your chassis with the jacks or air leveling.  This can break your windshield and/or do other damage.

ALWAYS be sure the front is raised high enough on the jack, and the airbags deflated, before attempting side-to-side leveling with the rear jacks.

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It’s a rainy day in Georgia so I decided to work on my door’s top lock that fortunately is only steps away. It took two pulls of the handle to open…first pull unlocked the bottom and then the pressure that’s put on the top one let’s the second pull, releases it. Sooner or later it was going to give me problems.

 

Took about 20 minutes to remove all the screws to gain access to the top lock. Sure enough, the 7/16th adjustable nut was not contacting the arm… took 8 flats (1.5 turn) to tighten it up.

 

Decided to leave the bottom one alone as getting to it was going to take some more time plus now they both release at the same time. I did mark where I could cut a slot so I could access the nut in the future without removing any screws. From the center of notch for the lock I measured down 2” and 2 1/2” for a slit in the future so I can access just the adjusting nut. 45 minutes total time to finish this project.

6E5A72B1-0A78-4CB7-9B70-9C27F0CE813F.jpeg

C9BE85CF-AC3B-40F2-95A0-4EBDC7B96EC1.jpeg

FBCD1331-79FF-4991-8DDD-3F9880B37E0C.jpeg

Edited by Ivylog
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Dave L,

Let me re-state my "twist" statement for you.......

While leveling my rig, I dump air, raise front (dual posts) with one control, followed by the rear jacks to level fore and aft, I then adjust either right or left rear jacks to level side to side following the manufactures procedure.

I believe this is putting a normal "twist" in my chassis, and my coach door would not open. 

Now that I have assured the latch posts are "moveable" (as designed) my door is functioning correctly. I can "flex" or "load" my chassis for normal leveling and my door no longer "jams"

A certain amount of flexibility of the chassis is normal and the door should not jam within certain limits, my door was jamming because the latch posts were not moving as designed, not because I was "twisting" my chassis excessively.

Others here may be experiencing the same problem with their door and understanding that the door latch posts NEED to have movement, and are DESIGNED to have movement, and if they do not have movement the door will "jam".  The windshield is also designed to "float" within it's framework, in that big rubber seal.  I believe if your chassis is flexing enough to break a windshield while leveling either the chassis has problems or your windshield is not mounted properly.

Ken

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Hi All! I experienced the same problem, same symptoms & difficult to open from the outside, I did all of the external & then internal adjustments. Finally found out about the brass bushing & mine was almost completely worn out. I turned another bushing to spec. & that solved all of my problems. Sure was happy to just have to replace a simple brass bushing!

Bart from VA

07 HR 42PDQ w/ GMC 2500 HD in tow

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20 hours ago, Cubflyer said:

Dave L,

Let me re-state my "twist" statement for you.......

While leveling my rig, I dump air, raise front (dual posts) with one control, followed by the rear jacks to level fore and aft, I then adjust either right or left rear jacks to level side to side following the manufactures procedure.

I believe this is putting a normal "twist" in my chassis, and my coach door would not open. 

Now that I have assured the latch posts are "moveable" (as designed) my door is functioning correctly. I can "flex" or "load" my chassis for normal leveling and my door no longer "jams"

A certain amount of flexibility of the chassis is normal and the door should not jam within certain limits, my door was jamming because the latch posts were not moving as designed, not because I was "twisting" my chassis excessively.

Others here may be experiencing the same problem with their door and understanding that the door latch posts NEED to have movement, and are DESIGNED to have movement, and if they do not have movement the door will "jam".  The windshield is also designed to "float" within it's framework, in that big rubber seal.  I believe if your chassis is flexing enough to break a windshield while leveling either the chassis has problems or your windshield is not mounted properly.

Ken

Hi Ken,

Thanks for the clarification.

I just wanted to caution you, and anyone else who reads this thread, that inducing twist into the chassis via improper leveling can do damage.

Your front jacks are plumbed together, so the coach can tilt freely at the front even though there are two jacks.  The procedure you are using sounds correct. as long as you don't bottom out one of the front jacks or wheels.

Yes, the chassis will experience some normal twist when on the road, but the suspension is designed to minimize that.  Those who break windshields are likely exceeding the tilt limits of the front jacks and putting extreme forces into the chassis.

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On 8/31/2021 at 8:05 AM, dleeadkins said:

Here is the adjustment I made highlighted in yellow. It shortens the length of pull and removes “slack “ in the outside door handle.

4BDA51B0-E2FE-4131-985A-B4375563F88E.jpeg

Door Bushing Replacement & Latch Adjustment.pdf 985.13 kB · 39 downloads

@dleeadkins Donald -  Thank you for taking the time to post this incredibly insightful diagram and description. I took the panel off to see what kind of shape the brass bushing in my door latch assembly was in, and to my surprise it was missing completely. It is probably at the bottom of the door cavity someplace, but I haven't gone so far as to open everything up.   I almost fooled myself into believing that that the lock mechanism had been redesigned and no bushing was required anymore, until I measured the post and it was just slightly over a quarter of an inch in diameter (the inside diameter of the missing bushing). I'm off to home depot tonight or tomorrow to find the bushing. If that fails I'm sure a machine shop somewhere in my area can make one.. Most of the bushings I found online are bronze, which is I guess what is applicable in this case?

20210905_183734.jpg

Edited by Steve P
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Yes. That bushing obviously plays an important role in this. I did check mine when I started this ongoing repair saga and mine was in good shape. I’m glad you were able to pinpoint this problem. Now you know several things about your door mechanism!

safe travels

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