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Salesman Switch Solenoid


Bob Wightman

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I have a 2004 Monaco Knight that i have replaced the salesman switch solenoid several times, and just did it again recently just to have it fail again.  I'm using original part number and every time i replace it everything works good for a few months then it blows the fuse again.  I like having this feature as i don't have the opportunity to use the coach as much as i would like and i can just turn everything on as i come in the way i left it last.  All my electrical connecting to the solenoid is good, I have replace the actual switch itself and still cant seem to make it reliable.  Has anybody else experienced this problem and found a solution for it?  I'm considering just replacing it with a battery on/off manual switch and be done with it but wanted to run it past the group for advice first.  Thanks in advance! 

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25 minutes ago, Bob Wightman said:

I have a 2004 Monaco Knight that i have replaced the salesman switch solenoid several times, and just did it again recently just to have it fail again.  I'm using original part number and every time i replace it everything works good for a few months then it blows the fuse again.  I like having this feature as i don't have the opportunity to use the coach as much as i would like and i can just turn everything on as i come in the way i left it last.  All my electrical connecting to the solenoid is good, I have replace the actual switch itself and still cant seem to make it reliable.  Has anybody else experienced this problem and found a solution for it?  I'm considering just replacing it with a battery on/off manual switch and be done with it but wanted to run it past the group for advice first.  Thanks in advance! 

Bob, my guess without looking at your diagrams you already have a battery cut off switch for chassis and house batteries.  Mine are located in the rear compartment curbside.  On my 05 Safari Gazelle I use this to disconnect both battery banks when I’m not expecting to use the coach much.  I may have a 04 Knight diagram, I can look at it. 
the downside is you have to access the rear compartment each time.  It’s not as convenient as the salesman switch.

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Replace the POS Battery Cut-Off continuous duty solenoid with a Latching Solenoid. That requires you to install a momentary switch in place of the on/off switch and you have to run an additional wire from the switch to the new solenoid.

Otherwise you either keep replacing what you have OR bypass the solenoid permanently and just use the House Battery Disconnect Switch.

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I think this is a good example of the kind of junk parts that is on the market today. My current rv I bought over 2 years ago and the solenoid worked part of time, previous owner said he had extra ones. Point is he was buying cheapest one he could find. (no brand name) I got a COLE HERSEE and never had any more trouble. A lot of parts may look identical on outside but the main components are inferior.

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On 10/15/2021 at 5:37 AM, Dr4Film said:

Replace the POS Battery Cut-Off continuous duty solenoid with a Latching Solenoid. 

X2. Another benefit is power consumption. My continuous solenoid drew 750ma. That’s 18AH/d

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On 10/15/2021 at 4:37 AM, Dr4Film said:

Replace the POS Battery Cut-Off continuous duty solenoid with a Latching Solenoid. That requires you to install a momentary switch in place of the on/off switch and you have to run an additional wire from the switch to the new solenoid.

Otherwise you either keep replacing what you have OR bypass the solenoid permanently and just use the House Battery Disconnect Switch.

13 minutes ago, wamcneil said:

X2. Another benefit is power consumption. My continuous solenoid drew 750ma. That’s 18AH/d

I just had to replace my solenoid a few weeks ago. I had the same thought "how much friggin' power does this thing use just staying energized all the time?". 

Could someone post a link to a suitable latching solenoid for reference?

 

 

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What I have IS a latching relay.  When you pulse the switch inside the door the relay closes, but it's not a magnetic relay closing it is a plunger type thing that closes the contacts and turns on the power.  When you pulse the relay again the plunger clicks and opens the contacts.  I have monitored the purple control wire and it only gets power when the switch is closed triggering the solenoid so when its either engaged or disengaged theres no draw on the solenoid coil.  You would think this thing would be serviceable but it's not, fortunately it's always failed and left the solenoid in the "On" condition.  I think i'm just going to bypass it with a battery switch in the front compartment  under the drivers seat.  Not convenient, but more convenient than the one in the battery compartment and i'm tired of messing with this thing.

KIB LR9806 Latching Relay.html

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My original setup had one KIB latching relay and also a continuous solenoid that was triggered by the output side of the latching relay. So the salesman switch controlled the KIB, and the KIB energized the continuous relay.
I think the KIB is only rated for 60a, so a lot of the house loads went through the continuous relay.
Do you have a similar arrangement or are all of your house loads going through the KIB? Maybe someone removed the secondary relay?

After I swapped all the halogen lights for LED, I calculated that all of the house loads could be handled by just the KIB. So I removed the continuous solenoid and connected its loads to the KIB. It’s been doing the job just fine for about 4 years now.

If you still have 80amps worth of halogen lights, plus all of the other house loads are going through the KIB, maybe high current is killing your relays?

Cheers

Walter

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Latching soenoids are mechanically latched and do not draw any power when on or off, only drawing power for a few seconds when they switch stated. DC however causes a LOT more arcing on the contacts than AC. Hence switches designed for DC have a more robust design to handle the arcing and hence cost more and this is especially true for higher amp switches.

I turn off loads before activiting these larger DC solenoids which helps with longer life. Likewise for switches. Failure of the 2 Monaco battery switches have been posted but I leave them on. I have Blue Seas switches on the posts of the 2 battery banks, 300A on the house and 2000A on the chassis batteries.

 

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On 10/16/2021 at 1:22 PM, StephenW said:

Blue Sea systems makes a 12v magnetic latching solenoid.

https://www.bluesea.com

I looked at the Blue sea site via your link, but did not see latching solenoids?

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