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Michelin X Multi Energy Z2 tire opinions!


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I have to buy some steer tires for my MH and am looking at the Michelin X tires in the title.  I looked in the tire and wheel post and was not able to find anything on them and only what dealers say about them online.  I was wondering if any of you have any direct experience with these tires.  I was also trying to find the Toyo M144 but they apparently do not come in the size I need 295/75r22.5, as I don't have the room to run the 295/80r22.5 on my coach.  All comments will be appreciated!

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M144 isyour best bet in my opinion from experience with both. I did google search on the 75R and it does come up from Tires Direct. don't know anything about them but apparently 75R are available

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I would also go with the Toyo's.  I went with the Michelin X's on my last set of Michelins.  After 2 sets of XZA2's had sidewall cracks too bad to live with after 3 1/2 years, Michelin recommended switching to the X's, I got 3 1/2 years out of them as well before they cracked.  That did it for Michelin for me.  I switched to the Toyo M144 and have been very pleased, my wife says they ride better than the Michelins and after 4 1/2 years and over 53,000 miles they look like new.

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Ditto on the Toyo, IF you can find the PROPER size….or if you can “afford” the aspect change.  I replaced my OEM GY with Bridgestone at 20K.  All was well and good until one of, the steers started to fail….as in the outside tread totally wore off….in maybe 2000 miles.  I left Raleigh and it had a little wear, which I was aware of and it had also been inspected by a good OTR shoo before our we left NC for California.  Noticed just outside Salt Lake that the rubber was gone.  All types of examination, in talking to Barry at Josams.  He was seeing sporadic failures of Bridgestone just like mine,  the other 5 were fine…wearing evenly.  
 

I opted to go to Toyo based on comments here.  Put on new steers at 55K.  That was over 10K and 4 years….  My 10 YO rear Bridgestones still looked great when I replaced recently with Toyo.  Now Bridgestone did discontinue my R or F series and maybe I had a fluke like Barry was seeing,  To date, there have, based on my keeping up here, no other reported failures of a Bridgestone….mine was wear and not a blowout.  
 

BUT, the cracking issues with the Michelins are a well documented fact….and I run Michelins on most of my other vehicles….or Bridgestone in some cases,

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We purchased Michelin energy tires for our coach a few years ago.  I opted for 315/80R-22.5 for the front and they have held up well.  Next time though I'm going for a less expensive option.  Probably Toyo or Yokohama.  

Make sure your air system is up to ride height when checking clearance.  

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, willbo777 said:

I would also go with the Toyo's.  I went with the Michelin X's on my last set of Michelins.  After 2 sets of XZA2's had sidewall cracks too bad to live with after 3 1/2 years, Michelin recommended switching to the X's, I got 3 1/2 years out of them as well before they cracked.  That did it for Michelin for me.  I switched to the Toyo M144 and have been very pleased, my wife says they ride better than the Michelins and after 4 1/2 years and over 53,000 miles they look like new.

I don't have experience with the 22.5" Michelin but I put a set on my Class C thinking "Buy" the best.  After 4 years they "cracked" out, the cracks were so bad I was afraid to drive it. 

When I bought the coach it had Goodyears, the front were rievered really bad.  The first set of 22.5" I put on my coach were Bridgestone, I was very pleased with them, good ride, no wear, and after +10 years ( we didn't use the coach for +4 years while building the house, covid and life in general that we didn't use the coach).  The still looked really good when I had them changed, I inspected each tire inside and out, would have never thought they were +10 years old.   I priced Bridgestone and they were too expensive knowing they'd age out before wearing out.

I wanted Toyo's but couldn't find any, I went with Yokohama's, 6 tires $3600 out the door.  Got a new TPMS so I'm good for another 7 years.

Edited by jacwjames
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I had 8 Michelin's Energy X, still have 6 on the rear coming on 6 years and not a single crack. Go figure. BTW, not sure how different your 00 Exec might be from ours being so similar but I fit the M144 295/80 up front fine, tight but fine. I am careful in some "offroading" situations because even the 75s would scrape the wheel opening under some crazy angles.

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I priced Bridgestone and they were too expensive knowing they'd age out before wearing out.  The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.  

Traveling from one destination to another is always ruined by tire failure.  

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The Goodyear on the steers showed obvious wear. Lots of rivering, so I replaced with Michelins a year ago. They seem to ride better than the Goodyear. The rear six are Goodyear and 7 years old. I checked them closely for wear, but I’m no tire expert. We plan to drive about 5,000 miles over the next year. Is there a way to confirm the tires are safe?

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1 hour ago, Pduggs said:

The Goodyear on the steers showed obvious wear. Lots of rivering, so I replaced with Michelins a year ago. They seem to ride better than the Goodyear. The rear six are Goodyear and 7 years old. I checked them closely for wear, but I’m no tire expert. We plan to drive about 5,000 miles over the next year. Is there a way to confirm the tires are safe?

I would not do 5k on 7 year Goodyears or any other for that matter. No one can inspect a tire visually and guarantee safety.

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17 minutes ago, Mark Holt said:

I would not do 5k on 7 year Goodyears or any other for that matter. No one can inspect a tire visually and guarantee safety.

Thanks. I’m undecided whether to replace or keep them for another year. They look great. No unusual wear, lots of tread left, and I always weight the coach annually and keep psi at the manufacturer’s suggested pressures. I know many DP owners replace at 7 years, but others go much longer. The RV Geeks went 10 years on theirs. 

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3 hours ago, Ivan K said:

I had 8 Michelin's Energy X, still have 6 on the rear coming on 6 years and not a single crack. Go figure. BTW, not sure how different your 00 Exec might be from ours being so similar but I fit the M144 295/80 up front fine, tight but fine. I am careful in some "offroading" situations because even the 75s would scrape the wheel opening under some crazy angles.  

Ivan, did you change out only the steer tires or all 8 tires, and also I only have the hwh levelling system (air only) no jacks of any kind and if I change out the front to a taller tire what wont that mess up level while camped?

4 hours ago, Mark Holt said:

M144 isyour best bet in my opinion from experience with both. I did google search on the 75R and it does come up from Tires Direct. don't know anything about them but apparently 75R are available

I just called Tires Direct and they do not have any 75R's and he looked at the Michelin website that they order from and michelin doesn't make that tire in the 75r, he suggested the M177 as a good steer tire, does anyone have knowledge on the M177 tire.

 

Thank you all for the advice and comments.  

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11 minutes ago, Texomaman73 said:

Ivan, did you change out only the steer tires or all 8 tires, and also I only have the hwh levelling system (air only) no jacks of any kind and if I change out the front to a taller tire what wont that mess up level while camped?

It doesn't level based on tire size, it levels based on what it has been told is level.  You can set the level manually to whatever you like then reset the system, and then with auto leveling it will level back to that.  Even if you park with one tire on a rock, it will still level just fine.

 

 

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Jeff, I used to run 11R all the way around. The diameter change to 295/80 was only 0.2", negligible. Diameter change between /75 and /80 would bring the front axle  0.7" higher, nothing wrong with that IMO. It makes no difference for air leveling or ride hight, not related. And yes, I only changed the steers to M144.

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2 hours ago, Pduggs said:

Thanks. I’m undecided whether to replace or keep them for another year. They look great. No unusual wear, lots of tread left, and I always weight the coach annually and keep psi at the manufacturer’s suggested pressures. I know many DP owners replace at 7 years, but others go much longer. The RV Geeks went 10 years on theirs. 

I think Michelin advocates getting the tires inspected if you try to run longer then 7 years, they advise to have the tire dismounted and inspected the inside.  Specifically looking for any signs of potential failure.  You can see impact breaks and cracking on the inside if the tire has been run low on air pressure.

I AM NOT AN EXPERT, but when I worked in the mines I initiated a program whereby the tire supplier would come in a couple times a month and inspect the tires on the equipment looking for correct tire sizing all the way around, tire pressures, cuts etc.  We would look at any tires that were removed, causes of failure etc  They would recommend changes.  Back 35 years ago my monthly budget for tires was ~+$70K.  I found that if I bought a new set of tires for best loader and best truck they would wear evenly, take the old ones and move them to other equipment based on sizing recommended by tire supplier.  Lots of money saved.  Also, missized tires cause lots of trouble with the drive train, equipment manufacturers recommended tires be within 3% rolling circumference all the way around.  I made a simple chart that  the mechanics used to pick the right size tire to put on the equipment.  When I was promoted to Operations Manager (with responsibility for maintenance), I standardized this approach across the 4 mines and 2 processing plants.   Again, I ain't an expert but this isn't my first rodeo either. 

So when I bought my rig in late 2008, I had the front tires changed do to the rivering, but I kept the Goodyears on the back, they were ~+7 years old, they looked good.  I kept a close eye on them and also installed a TPMS, the coach never moved until I got green lights on the TPMS.  I ran the rear tires for another 2 years.  When they were removed I inspected the insides, they looked like new. 

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I remember a year or so back when this topic was discussed on the group.  A what I called "a matter of fact type female" who joined the group after she purchased a used Monaco coach with 7 year old tires on it.  Several members warned her about changing out the tires.  Her answer was that there was a lot of thread wear left on the tires.  

A week or so later she posted that she was traveling 70 mph when she blew a left front tire.  She crossed into on coming traffic hitting a car head on with 5 people in it.  How about bearing that burden for the rest of your life.

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2 hours ago, Chuck B 2004 Windsor said:

I remember a year or so back when this topic was discussed on the group.  A what I called "a matter of fact type female" who joined the group after she purchased a used Monaco coach with 7 year old tires on it.  Several members warned her about changing out the tires.  Her answer was that there was a lot of thread wear left on the tires.  

A week or so later she posted that she was traveling 70 mph when she blew a left front tire.  She crossed into on coming traffic hitting a car head on with 5 people in it.  How about bearing that burden for the rest of your life.

I keep my steers newer than the rear.
 

I seldom go over 65mph. Going 70 for prolonged periods sounds dangerous to me, though I’ve been passed by many MHs going 70 and more. Some of them gassers. 
 

About five years ago I saw a nice Dynasty in the park. As I walked by the coach along it’s driver’s side, the sun hit it just right. I could read the DOT. 2006!!! I tried to catch the owner but he was never around when I walked by. I can only suspect many motorhome owners aren’t tire aware.

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7 hours ago, Chuck B 2004 Windsor said:

 

Looks are deceiving, ask any female who puts on their face every morning and removes it every night.

Yeah, I don't think I'll take ya up on that one Chuck 🤐!

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Hey Jeff

I am running Toyo 295/75/22.5 M177's on the rears.  The are are running true and good wear patterns. Installed Aug 2019, 20k miles since and still look new.

Be sure you get the Toyo load chart and you will see that there are two load ratings, actually different 177 tires.  The chart shows two SKU numbers with the 

SKU 547130 being a heavier load tire.  Chart shows you would have to run 125psi for a 7,160 single 14, 320 front axle load rating.  That may be a little harsh on ride, I don't know.  I run 105 psi in rears and tag and have what appears to be good sidewall flex/cushion and gives a good ride. 

That SKU # is important and is molded on the tire be sure your dealer is getting the heavier load range tire for you. 

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  • 3 months later...
On 5/25/2022 at 1:47 PM, Pduggs said:

Thanks. I’m undecided whether to replace or keep them for another year. They look great. No unusual wear, lots of tread left, and I always weight the coach annually and keep psi at the manufacturer’s suggested pressures. I know many DP owners replace at 7 years, but others go much longer. The RV Geeks went 10 years on theirs. 

At about 7 years of age our Goodyears (original to the coach) starting failing, we lost 3 of eight in about 4 months.  A steer tire blowout on the highway is a life changing event, don't ask how I know.  I wouldn't delay in replacing, I would note that our tires looked great right up until they failed.

I'm due for a new set as the Michelin's I have now are starting to show sidewall cracking, these tires are 7 years old.  I think I'll try TOYO M144 this time around.

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