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NEED TPMS ADVICE - THANKS


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21 hours ago, Chuck-Kathy_Orlando said:

Very nice!   I like how you have it mounted.  By the way, what TPMS do you use?  The previous owner gave me his, but he admitted that her didn't like it and I was thinking about getting one that I liked.  Your's looks interesting, as I'm assuming that the lower screen is the TPMS.

MODERATOR NOTE

Changing topic is mid posting is a violation of Site Rules.  In this case, the proper method would have been to do a SEARCH.  USE TPMS as the key word...then select Everywhere.  Select TOPICS.  Then search.

Then scroll or skim the results and read.  The particular brand MAY have already been discussed....IF NOT and the information below was pertinent, then CHOOSE the topic that is most appropriate or usually the one with the most recent post. Then post the comment there.  That reopens the discussion under the correct subject.

Doing the housekeeping to keep topics segregated requires a lot of offline work...by the the staff.

Thanks for understanding and not creating additional work.  Dave does NOT pay us DOUBLE TIME for "HOUSEKEEPING"...  LOL.

END OF EDIT

I highly recommend a TPMS.  It's a must have when a blown steer tire can be fatal, or a rear dually can destroy some undercarriage, a toad or go undetected until the other dually blows.

I had the TireMinder TM-77 and didn't like it but not willing to invest hundreds for another brand.  What I don't like is having to push a button to scroll through all the tires but it does monitor all tires continuously.  The biggest issue is with the sensors failing (misreads, false alarms, low psi, stops reading, inaccurate psi), and they're the bulk of the cost.  So expensive I bought the TM-88C on sale because it was cheaper than buying 4 more sensors.  It's basically the same monitor except color and a few added features.  The user interface is difficult and the manual is overwritten in so much detail it's confusing.  OTOH TireMinder customer service is VERY GOOD.  People here like the TST but it also only displays one tire at a time.  I ran across this review of TPMS systems but no idea how good the different systems are over time -

https://www.rvingknowhow.com/rv-tire-pressure-monitoring-system-reviews/

- bob

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27 minutes ago, cbr046 said:

I highly recommend a TPMS.  It's a must have when a blown steer tire can be fatal, or a rear dually can destroy some undercarriage, a toad or go undetected until the other dually blows.

I had the TireMinder TM-77 and didn't like it but not willing to invest hundreds for another brand.  What I don't like is having to push a button to scroll through all the tires but it does monitor all tires continuously.  The biggest issue is with the sensors failing (misreads, false alarms, low psi, stops reading, inaccurate psi), and they're the bulk of the cost.  So expensive I bought the TM-88C on sale because it was cheaper than buying 4 more sensors.  It's basically the same monitor except color and a few added features.  The user interface is difficult and the manual is overwritten in so much detail it's confusing.  OTOH TireMinder customer service is VERY GOOD.  People here like the TST but it also only displays one tire at a time.  I ran across this review of TPMS systems but no idea how good the different systems are over time -

https://www.rvingknowhow.com/rv-tire-pressure-monitoring-system-reviews/

- bob

Thanks Bob!   As @Cajunboy1959 had mentioned in another post, he had good luck with the TST-507 with flow through sensors.   As you said, none are probably going to be perfect, but I'll have to accept that at least one is certainly better than not having one!

24 minutes ago, Steve P said:

Buy an annual RV Life subscription and run it on an iPad, Android tablet, or phone of your choice (or all of them).  It serves multiple purposes.  And you can run it with all your other apps, like Open Roads for fuel, RV Parky and The Dyrt, AccuWeather, etc.  Download the maps state by state if you might not have a cell ir wifi signal (GPS mapping function will still work).  You get bridge heights, etc.  Campground info, reviews, and much more.  All mapping software is at the mercy of bad data, so any of them may mis-route you once in a while.  RV Life has been great about correcting the two issues I reported (side roads, impossible u-turn).  Don't through money away on Garmin... they lost their edge a while ago when competition heated up.  IMHO 😉 

Funny you mention RV Life, it's one that I had considered some time back but didn't go down that path since at the time, we weren't really traveling outside of Florida and the surrounding states.   With our new rig, our plan is to travel out west and up north, so a subscription now might be more worth it, plus all the other features that it offers.

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Since the OP added TPMS to this thread I will chime in on the topic.

My first TPMS purchase was a Doran back in 2010 prior to traveling on the road Full-Time. I had 10 Cap sensors, 6 for the coach and 4 for the trailer I was towing. Bottom-line it was a piece of junk. I had lost multiple trailer tires due to the TPMS. Plus on my very last trip with it from Reno to Santa Clarita CA I had 5 of the 10 sensors not reporting properly. Sold the POS on eBay. That winter while in CA I went to the CA RV Show and saw a vendor displaying the Tire SafeGuard TPMS. Purchased it and it was GREAT! I ended up purchasing another one for my car and one for my motorcycle. The system worked as it should for the next 10 years until the company folded and went out of business. I was switching coaches and wanted a new TPMS so after lots of research and reading I decided on the Pressure Pro Pulse TPMS 12 Sensor System. The only downside is I had to run the add-on coaxial antenna extension to eliminate dropped signals.

I have used it now for the past two years on my Dynasty without having ANY issues whatsoever. I don't need to look at the monitor or scroll through the tires other than first thing before leaving for the days drive. While driving there is a green LED light that states the system is on and all is good based on the initial parameters when you first set up the system. If there was any problem, it immediately sounds an alarm and the screen flashes exactly what and where the problem is located.

Choose wisely as your life may depend on it!

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Posted (edited)

X2 vote for a TST 507 TPMS 

I had first bought a Hughes, why>>> it cost less BUT the tire sensors did not have replaceable batteries so the replacement was expensive and eventually they discontinued making sensors.  So it ended up in the trash.

When I had new tires mounted in 2021 I had already bought a TST 507, went through the process of setting it up and give it a thumbs up.   It has never given me a bad reading and/or dropped a signal.  I do not use an extender. 

This year before my wife left on her trip I replaced the batteries which are readily available, all the sensors were still working but the batteries were +3 years old.  I do not remove them from the tires as on a regular basis I plug the monitor in and check pressures.  

I told my wife the coach does not move until the TPMS is up and showing good pressures.  She was getting ready to head home from Michigan last week and called me in a panic>>> "the tire pressure was only 65", I explained that that was the temperature so she let it scroll through each tire and read off the pressures, all were good. 

Rig doesn't move without the Silverleaf up and running communicating with engine/transmission.  I try to do everything I can to give to me the advantage to keep the coach running.  @22 years old you have to.

 

@tmw188 and I stay in touch, he sent me a picture of his storage yd neighbor's coach.  They had a front passenger side blow out, coach and toad ended up on it's side, totaled but luckily no bad injuries.  He had a TPMS but didn't install it prior to the 3K trip, 200 miles from home +10 year old front tire blew.  They were very lucky.

 

Edited by jacwjames
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NOTE

A new topic was created and all the pertinent posts were individually split off from the original...

See the edit on the first post.

Thanks for helping us out...

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We are in the market to upgrade our TPMS system also.   I have been doing a lot of research and to add to the question here, is anyone one using the Tiretracker TT-600.   In my research it seems to have a lot of the same features TST, competitive pricing and a Lifetime Warranty.  I have done some searching and don't find a lot of reference to users or videos of this TPMS.

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I have used the Tire Tracker models for 10 years and have no complaints. My first one just aged out after many years of service. I purchased a new one and it continues to provide excellent service. I purchase spare sensor batteries on Amazon and the system always warns when signal is lost, usually due to dead or weak batteries. It's a 5 minute change. Last year I purchased a new color unit only because the sale price was less than the cost of the six new sensors. The new unit came with a remote receiver as well. I am using the remote receiver, which compensates for weak batteries on trailer and car. The new unit and sensors are stored for back up, probably will never use it. The 2000 Diplomat is like me, aging with several new parts.

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I've had EEZTire since (edit) 2017. In my shopping around at that time I remember the decision coming down to EZ or TST. I think cost was the main differentiator. The systems in my price range seem to all have hokey LCD displays that are kind of archaic, but get the job done.

Initial setup was confusing and a hassle. Maybe the other options are just as complicated? Maybe the UIs have improved in the last 7 years and they're easier to configure? Dunno.

The system has been relatively trouble-free. One sensor failed. Another one was somehow 'forgotten' by the head unit and had to be reprogrammed. Customer service was pretty responsive the one time I called them. I leave the sensors on the wheels all the time, and have had to replace all of the batteries at least once. And all the outer-cover o-rings.

Battery life on the head unit is great. I thought it would need to be plugged in most of the time, but I can go several trips without having to recharge the unit. It's apparently got a motion sensor in it and will shut down after I park the rig.

I don't have sensors for the toad, but have experimented and found that the head unit will pick them up on the toad without an extender.

5 hours ago, Steve P said:

Is anyone using the Pressure Pro Pulse FX product that loads on tablets and phones (called Bring Your Own Display) rather than having a separate single purpose display?  See https://pressurepro.us/fx/ for details.  This seems like a very interesting product! 

I don't have any experience with it, but would also love to hear from someone that does!

I'm not sure how that would work logistically. Can you have their app "share" a tablet with another app like BlueFire? Or would it need to run on a dedicated device?

Edited by wamcneil
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The best TPMS I have is my hand.  At every rest stop I walk around my rig and touch every tire.  I one is warmer then the others then it is low pressure.  Time to get out the air gage and add air to it.  I also check all the tire pressure every 3 to 4 weeks.  Or before going on a long trip.

 

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1 hour ago, astgerma said:

The best TPMS I have is my hand.  At every rest stop I walk around my rig and touch every tire.  I one is warmer then the others then it is low pressure.  Time to get out the air gage and add air to it.  I also check all the tire pressure every 3 to 4 weeks.  Or before going on a long trip.

 

By the time you discover that one tire is too hot it's too late. Tire destruction has already occurred.

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19 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

By the time you discover that one tire is too hot it's too late. Tire destruction has already occurred.

No offense to the comment...but DITTO.

We have members that actually do use their Thermal Laser pyrometers and check their tires after long drives...they then to pull quite a few hours.  They also have developed a custom interface with their TPMS (Pressure Pro) and have the temps displayed on a lap top screen that is like a BIG "IMPORTANT" data readings screen. 

Others like David Pratt, for one, and myself drive and watch or scroll through the Pressure Pro TPMS PRESSURE SCREEN...  We watch PRESSURE.

The Temp sensor on the Pressure Pro, as well as EVERY OTHER SCREW ON TYPE, is "nicely put" WORTHLESS.  It, in effect, is an AMBIENT temperature reader.  Want to know how hot it is outside, in the sun at a CG.  Turn on your TPMS system, assuming it has the "VITAL AND CUTESY" TEMPERATURE displayed.  BINGO...you got it.

NOW, driving down the highway....all it is doing is measuring the "Wheel" temperature, very CRUDELY, while driving 60 MPH.  There was ONLY one brand that actually gave you meaningful information about TIRE TEMPERAURE.  That was SmarTire.  Monaco installed it and then, I think it disappeared.  I still have the old manual. It was a text book on Tire pressure and Temperature and SAFETY.

When the tire companies do testing....they have INTERNAL sensors....on bands, just like the SmarTire did...and they know, based on simple physics (OK...not so simple...but I took several courses...passed...and it sort of makes sense)..

Pressure and Temperature are RELATED.  It is called the PERFECT GAS LAW.  STOP NOW...

Basically, You can calculate the exact temperature in your tire at any given pressure.  You need a spreadsheet.  You need to know the morning's Pressure and Temperature...before SUNLIGHT hits the tires.  Then at any time, assuming you have an assistant with your laptop, you will know the temperature by telling them an individual TIRE PRESSURE.  THAT was a LOT of work...but it WORKS.....and I had a PhD (Chemistry) with knowledge verify my formulas.

However...the EASY and COMMON SENSE...  Watch your PRESSURES.  The alarms will go off...properly SET.  BUT, myself and several others "KNOW" what to expect and we scan (or one has them displayed in big type) the pressures.  You can look at the Outside Temp display (my Dash has that) and then the pressures and know if there is a problem or all is well.

YES, a HAND is better than nothing.  BUT a simple, brand is up to you....but reliable, TPMS reading and knowing the outside temperature and monitoring that is the easiest.

BUT, for safety's SAKE....never rely or depend on the MEANINGLESS "TEMPERATURE" number displayed by ANY system.  If you have an INTERNAL one with sensors mounted on the well of the wheel...  YES... But otherwise...you can't measure the internal tire temperature through a1/4" column of AIR.  It don't WORK THAT WAY...

Thanks, Richard for your comment...

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In nearly all cases, the cause of high tire temp is low pressure.
As the temp increases, the pressure follows suit, and the tire will reach an equilibrium based on load, speed, airflow, ambient and road temperatures.

The only things that could artificially raise that temp is a brake or bearing that is getting hot, which would also show up as a higher pressure.

Just get used to what your tires normally do, and set alarms outside those parameters.
 

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When I first bought my rig I needed a new set of tires on the front.  When they installed they checked pressures all around, they didn't note if any were low. 

Stuff happens and I got laid off from work so we (I) decided a trip to Alaska was warranted.  I decided to buy and install a TPMS prior and installed.  I took note of all the pressures and topped off.  As we were getting ready I noticed one rear tire loosing 1-2 psi a day, not noticeable from the visual inspection but evident on the TPMS display so I started checking and found on of the rear tire wire braided valve extenders was leaking, sprayed soapy water found it, small bubble came up.  Never would have known without the TPMS and at some point the low pressure would have caused a problem and probably tire failure as we were driving long distances every day. 

So now the coach doesn't move with out the TPMS up showing pressures good.

 

2 hours ago, astgerma said:

The best TPMS I have is my hand.  At every rest stop I walk around my rig and touch every tire.  I one is warmer then the others then it is low pressure.  Time to get out the air gage and add air to it.  I also check all the tire pressure every 3 to 4 weeks.  Or before going on a long trip.

 

I'm about as old school as you can get but taking chances on tires & tire pressure ain't one of them.   Some of the new technology is worth this old dog learning new tricks for. 

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On 7/8/2024 at 7:25 AM, Steve P said:

Is anyone using the Pressure Pro Pulse FX product that loads on tablets and phones (called Bring Your Own Display) rather than having a separate single purpose display?  See https://pressurepro.us/fx/ for details.  This seems like a very interesting product! 

Steve P - I have this unit.  I do like the portability of having it on my device so I can check tire pressures when not sitting in the drivers seat.  Plus combines usability of my device screen.  Even if the tire pressures are not displayed on the screen, if the app is open, you will still get an alarm if temp or pressures are out of range.

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