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At the indy500 for the weekend and when pulling into campsite I’ve become stuck. I’m in the site enough so not going anywhere haven’t become too buried but if there are any tips trying at the end of the weekend please let me know. Not supposed to rain anymore so I’m crossing my fingers!!!

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Posted (edited)

The front axle is the place to connect a tow. The 2" hitch in the back is best for a rear tow. This advice came from the manager of the Roadmaster assembly plant in Elkhart in 2008. Dig out in front of the tires to create a ramp and put in a board. See if you can stay longer for more drying time. Good Luck and have fun.

Gary 05 AMB DST

Edited by Gary 05 AMB DST
second thought
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It depends on how deep you are stuck and if it's all 3 axles or only the drive.  If the ground dries out, I'd dig out in front and rear of each axle tire, lift the tag axle to put more weight on the drive and less weight on the front axle.  Then try to back out a bit. Stop then try driving forward.  Under no circumstances should you try to rock out the coach by shifting the trans between drive and reverse.  The strain will likely destroy your drive axle differential.

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Eco what frank said,tag up,back out,shovel and 2x6,2x8 better under tag and right behind drives,get a pull backwards from the rear hitch by,lots of hardware around a race track,spark up the grill and cold ones someone will be eager to help! Heck I would be all over that!

Wayne 

1999 Signature ceaser 

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Also, use the ATC if your coach is equipped with that option. It is a momentary switch, so you have to hold it down to engage it.

I had gotten the Windsor stuck in some very soft sand in our rear alleyway just after purchasing the house. By doing some digging and using the ATC switch on the driver's dash panel I was able to walk the coach out of the "sand trap".

My first project was to redo the alleyway and build a solid rear access driveway such that i would never get stuck again which I have not. I now own a much heavier Dynasty and the granite stone driveway is holding up just fine.

When I do projects, I tend to go overboard such that I do NOT want to have to go through the time and money to redo it again. My favorite Uncle always told me to do things right the first time with whatever time and money it takes then you won't have to come back and do it again. He was a very WISE man!

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15 hours ago, Gary 05 AMB DST said:

The front axle is the place to connect a tow. The 2" hitch in the back is best for a rear tow. This advice came from the manager of the Roadmaster assembly plant in Elkhart in 2008. Dig out in front of the tires to create a ramp and put in a board. See if you can stay longer for more drying time. Good Luck and have fun.

Gary 05 AMB DST

I have nightmares about getting stuck, not sure how you hook to the front axle and get the strap low enough to pull without getting into the front cap.

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Funny to say, I had that nightmare dream last night and had to go watch some TV to stop it. Must have been triggered by this post. My plan was to remove the generator slide fiberglass if it really happened. But that would not be possible without a slide.

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37 minutes ago, FishAR said:

I have nightmares about getting stuck, not sure how you hook to the front axle and get the strap low enough to pull without getting into the front cap.

If you watch the Weather Channel at all at night, there are programs on (Highway Thru Hell & Heavy Rescue 401) regarding large rig recoveries and towing. Any big rig towing company worth their weight in smarts know exactly how to do a low recovery without destroying the front cap of the coach.

It's just a matter of rigging the recovery vehicle correctly and having the right equipment. If they don't, they won't touch my coach!

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17 minutes ago, Dr4Film said:

If you watch the Weather Channel at all at night, there are programs on (Highway Thru Hell & Heavy Rescue 401) regarding large rig recoveries and towing. Any big rig towing company worth their weight in smarts know exactly how to do a low recovery without destroying the front cap of the coach.

It's just a matter of rigging the recovery vehicle correctly and having the right equipment. If they don't, they won't touch my coach!

I'm kind of snakebit, went through my first tow last December. Got my motorhome back a week ago after being in the shop for 4 weeks and $16,600 in repairs due to that tow.

Hopefully never need another one but I'm thinking lowboy if I do.

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I always carry tire chains in all my vehicles, summer and winter.  Been stuck on wet grass here in Or. So far chaining up and with the help of a friendly 4 x 4 I have never had to call for a tow.

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I got stuck with the Discovery in our front yard, because we couldn't back in from the side street.  The only choice was to come in through the main road and hope it didn't sink.  That didn't work, so I had to call a tow truck to winch it out for $50.  I was lucky.

We sold the house soon after.  The rig was too heavy for the 4" of concrete with no base, and the RV garage would no longer fit our RV.  It was fine for our 32 ft. rig, but when we upgraded this home just didn't fit the bill.  Went full time for a while to see how that would work out, and when winter came, we got an apartment (compartment).  This story is very long, I'll write a journal someday (or not).

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2 hours ago, 6Wheels said:

I got stuck with the Discovery in our front yard, because we couldn't back in from the side street.  The only choice was to come in through the main road and hope it didn't sink.  That didn't work, so I had to call a tow truck to winch it out for $50.  I was lucky.

We sold the house soon after.  The rig was too heavy for the 4" of concrete with no base, and the RV garage would no longer fit our RV.  It was fine for our 32 ft. rig, but when we upgraded this home just didn't fit the bill.  Went full time for a while to see how that would work out, and when winter came, we got an apartment (compartment).  This story is very long, I'll write a journal someday (or not).

It took 3 years of a 36 ft Top End (22K WH chassis) and 12 years of our 34K Camelot to destroy a 4” driveway…that was then, 32, years old.  I fussed and fumed and finally did most of the design myself after reading and talking to contractors.  I went back with 6” in the sections where the MH would be.  That included 7” at the edges and tapering to 6” about a foot in…and at the road.  I had 4” of Crusher Run down.  Used rebar on 30” centers and had wire (mesh) on top of that.  The mix was 5000 PSI fiberglass reinforced, air entrained concrete.  I also limited the expansion joints to a max of 11’ X 11’ and had a “deep” cut “picture frame” style of joint.  I let it cure and cure and CURE. I waited 6 months and then double coated (NS pass then EW pass) it with a penetrating sealer.

Hopefully it will last….

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On 5/28/2022 at 1:53 PM, Gary Cole said:

I always carry tire chains in all my vehicles, summer and winter.  Been stuck on wet grass here in Or. So far chaining up and with the help of a friendly 4 x 4 I have never had to call for a tow.

Gary, I'm not familiar tire chains. How do you install the chains if you are already stuck and the bottom of the tire is buried in mud? Sounds like a very logical solution.

Thanks,

Gary 05 AMB DST

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Gary I have hydraulic jacks so I can usually raise the rear tires high enough to install the chains before I get in trouble. Not sure how much the chains would help if you are already buried. Been in your situation. Best of luck.

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We are at the Indy 500 too in Lot 1C. We got stuck coming in on Thursday. Still had the toad attached, so disconnected that and they pulled me out with a track steer from the rear hitch.

Getting ready to leave early in the morning and I wanted to make sure I could get out as we had sunk into the soft grass. First try I moved out of the depressions, but then my drive wheels started spinning. Took a second shot at with the tag lifted, and was able to drive out to some unused ground for the night.

Paul

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I imagine the promoters at Indy have a REAL tractor if the track steer isn't enough.  You're probably not the only one stuck, too.  Ask around.  Hitch pulling is the only way I'd go. 

Been there, done that, except when I got stuck we had to disconnect the trailer first, from a sideways slope, and of course it was dark (fun stuff).  Pulled it backwards with a tractor chained to the hitch until we got to dry ground.  There was so much mud it was oozing out from between the wheels.  Left a mess on the highway next day. 

image.png.4b671b791b8dc48d7027f5d9acb525a8.png

 

Good luck getting out.  Enjoy the race!

- bob

 

 

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I carry a 9” long 6X6 for multiple uses… block for jacking, 9” airbag replacement (I do carry a replacement airbag) and for holding a strap/chain down so it goes under the front cap.

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On 5/28/2022 at 12:53 PM, Gary Cole said:

I always carry tire chains in all my vehicles, summer and winter.  Been stuck on wet grass here in Or. So far chaining up and with the help of a friendly 4 x 4 I have never had to call for a tow.

Do you have the cable type "chains" for the coach?

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On 5/28/2022 at 9:34 AM, Ivan K said:

  My plan was to remove the generator slide fiberglass if it really happened. But that would not be possible without a slide.

Your Sig's gotta have a generator slide?

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38 minutes ago, 96 EVO said:

Your Sig's gotta have a generator slide?

Yes it does, thats why I thought of it. I carry a 80k breaking lbs bungee in the hummer just in case I might need it off road and was imagining that it could be used for some light case of getting stuck with the coach too as we do a lot of boondocking when possible. The bungee ropes can help to do quite incredible recoveries even when pulled with a smaller vehicle because of the spring action. 

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12 hours ago, Paul A. said:

Do you have the cable type "chains" for the coach?

Paul I'm using the traditional "chain" chains. They are harder on a vehicle however they seem to be more effective based on my limited experience. I just creep along and remove them  as soon as possible.

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8 hours ago, Ivan K said:

Yes it does, thats why I thought of it. I carry a 80k breaking lbs bungee in the hummer  The bungee ropes can help to do quite incredible recoveries even when pulled with a smaller vehicle because of the spring action. 

Would like to see a picture or link to it…80K bungee. You can’t break a 1” nylon 3 strand 100’ rope with a PU truck starting bumper to bumper … 24K breaking strength.

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